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Old 07-12-2010, 09:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I've been all over the South and I've never once seen an anti-abortion billboard. I assumed that it was more because of the Catholic influence because I started seeing them in Perry & Ste Genevieve counties which are both very Catholic (46% for Perry, 50% for Ste G) Also some of the billboards had the Virgin Mary on them. I even saw a few in St. Louis.

The accent was noticeably different starting in Cape Girardeau. I could hear a Midwestern accent. I have an ear for that kinda thing, my friends never noticed. They didn't even notice that people in St. Louis talk differently. Also, people seemed more reserved in the small towns between Cape & St. Louis. People in small Southern towns are more outgoing & friendly. Again, very subtle differences, I wouldn't expect the average person to notice.
From what I heard you don't see anti-abortion billboards in the Midwest either. It seems to be rather peculiar to the St. Louis area. There is a different Midwest accent depending on how far North you are. To me coming from the St. Louis area, someone from the Great Lakes sounds as different to me or even more so than someone from the South. My guess is in most of Missouri it tends to be the average of the two.

I am thinking the reserved/outgoing difference might be based on religion here. Catholicism tends to be introverted while Evangelical Protestantism is extroverted. This likely bleeds over in personal lives. I would be interested if we can plot out where people on average are more outgoing/reserved and see if it correlates to different things. Though I also have to think some of this is weather or not the other person you are talking with considers you in-group or out-group.
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:06 AM
 
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From what I heard you don't see anti-abortion billboards in the Midwest either. It seems to be rather peculiar to the St. Louis area.
The one other place I've seen a lot of these billboards is the stretch of I35 from St Paul up to Duluth in MN - there's probably at least 10 of them. This is probably due to St Paul being heavily Catholic due to it's Irish roots as opposed to the rest of the state which is largely Lutheran and Scandanavian. The east central edge of the state where I35 runs through seems to also have a lot more Catholics than most of the other rural areas in the state. Plus I've always thought that St Paul (without Mpls) is a very similar, smaller version of St Louis.
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
The one other place I've seen a lot of these billboards is the stretch of I35 from St Paul up to Duluth in MN - there's probably at least 10 of them. This is probably due to St Paul being heavily Catholic due to it's Irish roots as opposed to the rest of the state which is largely Lutheran and Scandanavian. The east central edge of the state where I35 runs through seems to also have a lot more Catholics than most of the other rural areas in the state. Plus I've always thought that St Paul (without Mpls) is a very similar, smaller version of St Louis.
Did it have a rather strong Catholic undertone to it like in St. Louis?
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
The one other place I've seen a lot of these billboards is the stretch of I35 from St Paul up to Duluth in MN - there's probably at least 10 of them. This is probably due to St Paul being heavily Catholic due to it's Irish roots as opposed to the rest of the state which is largely Lutheran and Scandanavian. The east central edge of the state where I35 runs through seems to also have a lot more Catholics than most of the other rural areas in the state. Plus I've always thought that St Paul (without Mpls) is a very similar, smaller version of St Louis.
Minneapolis and St. Paul both seem to be heavily Catholic.

Hennepin County (Minneapolis)- 23% Catholic (higher that Stl City) and growing; 14% Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and declining. (there are other Lutheran denominations listed, but none are significant in number)

Ramsey County (St. Paul)- 31% Catholic (Higher than Stl County) and stable; 13% Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and declining.

So I definitely think the Lutheran influence is overplayed in the Twin Cities while the Catholic influenced is underplayed.
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Old 07-12-2010, 11:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Minneapolis and St. Paul both seem to be heavily Catholic.

Hennepin County (Minneapolis)- 23% Catholic (higher that Stl City) and growing; 14% Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and declining. (there are other Lutheran denominations listed, but none are significant in number)

Ramsey County (St. Paul)- 31% Catholic (Higher than Stl County) and stable; 13% Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and declining.

So I definitely think the Lutheran influence is overplayed in the Twin Cities while the Catholic influenced is underplayed.
That's not "heavily" Catholic.

I'd say Cleveland's metro of 65% is heavily catholic.
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Old 07-12-2010, 11:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
That's not "heavily" Catholic.

I'd say Cleveland's metro of 65% is heavily catholic.
Then the question is how closely tied to the culture Catholicism is in an area along with how devout are they as well.

I have noticed that Catholics in the South and Lower Midwest do tend to be more devout than the Upper Midwest and Northeast? I wonder why that is?
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Old 07-12-2010, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
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Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
Then the question is how closely tied to the culture Catholicism is in an area along with how devout are they as well.

I have noticed that Catholics in the South and Lower Midwest do tend to be more devout than the Upper Midwest and Northeast? I wonder why that is?
We're more secular here in the norther tier of the country. Up here, religion is more of a social institution than it is a belief system.
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Old 07-12-2010, 12:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
That's not "heavily" Catholic.

I'd say Cleveland's metro of 65% is heavily catholic.
It's not even half that percentage
The Association of Religion Data Archives | Maps & Reports


Heavily doesn't even have to indicate a huge percentage of the population. Memphis is only 15% Southern Baptist, but everyone says that it's heavily Southern Baptist. People always talk about how St. Louis is heavily Catholic, but the metro is less than 25% Catholic.

My point was that there are more Catholics in St. Paul AND Minneapolis than there are Lutherans, so the Lutheran influence seems overplayed.
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Old 07-12-2010, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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On the term "upper midwest" - what does upper mean? northern? if so, there's no way Indiana and Ohio, and NO WAY Missouri could count, because they are the southern border of the Midwest.
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Old 07-12-2010, 02:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
It's not even half that percentage
The Association of Religion Data Archives | Maps & Reports


Heavily doesn't even have to indicate a huge percentage of the population. Memphis is only 15% Southern Baptist, but everyone says that it's heavily Southern Baptist. People always talk about how St. Louis is heavily Catholic, but the metro is less than 25% Catholic.

My point was that there are more Catholics in St. Paul AND Minneapolis than there are Lutherans, so the Lutheran influence seems overplayed.
I'm not sure where that link is getting the population figures for the metro. But the area of Cleveland is overwhelmingly Catholic. And I never disputed that St. Paul or Minny don't have more Catholics than Lutherans. I think it's the majority religion in Minnesota, though I could be wrong.
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