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Old 07-12-2010, 03:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
I'm not sure where that link is getting the population figures for the metro. But the area of Cleveland is overwhelmingly Catholic. And I never disputed that St. Paul or Minny don't have more Catholics than Lutherans. I think it's the majority religion in Minnesota, though I could be wrong.
I looked up the county where Cleveland is located, it's around 35% Catholic. They get the numbers from church rolls.

Lutherans are not the largest religion in MN.
The Association of Religion Data Archives | Maps & Reports

25% of the population is Catholic
21-23% is Lutheran- 17% is ELCA, 4% is LCMS, and then there are smaller Lutheran sects, probably no more than 2% combined.
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Old 07-12-2010, 03:33 PM
 
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I would assume the majority of Minnesotan Catholics are in the Twin Cities area. Lutheranism seems much more prominent in the rural areas of the state but that is from my perspective as a Catholic in St Paul. I will say that the Twin Cities are one of the more Catholic areas in the country and this gets overlooked due to the religion of the rest of the state. That being said, religion is definitely not overwhelming here and as someone else said, it's more of a social institution than anything.
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Old 07-12-2010, 03:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
I would assume the majority of Minnesotan Catholics are in the Twin Cities area. Lutheranism seems much more prominent in the rural areas of the state but that is from my perspective as a Catholic in St Paul. I will say that the Twin Cities are one of the more Catholic areas in the country and this gets overlooked due to the religion of the rest of the state. That being said, religion is definitely not overwhelming here and as someone else said, it's more of a social institution than anything.
It also probably has to do with the fact that it's the largest metro area (and one of the few) where Lutherans are a significant percentage of the population. Catholics can be found in large numbers all over, but for Lutherans it's not so common. I guess that's why people overemphasize the Lutheran influence in the Twin Cities
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Old 07-12-2010, 04:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
It's not even half that percentage
The Association of Religion Data Archives | Maps & Reports


Heavily doesn't even have to indicate a huge percentage of the population. Memphis is only 15% Southern Baptist, but everyone says that it's heavily Southern Baptist. People always talk about how St. Louis is heavily Catholic, but the metro is less than 25% Catholic.

My point was that there are more Catholics in St. Paul AND Minneapolis than there are Lutherans, so the Lutheran influence seems overplayed.
I am thinking a lot of this is due to cultural influence of a deonomination making it stronger in a location. Also with Memphis there are likely a lot of other denominations and non-denominational Protestants with similar theology that is adding to this.

I think with St. Louis it has a lot to do with how it contrasts with the rest of the state. It also has to do with how relgion in viewed in the Midwest with the Northern parts more secular while it gets more devout the further South you go.
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Old 07-12-2010, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Originally Posted by FreeStater View Post
That's pretty much it. It's a perception thing. One thing you will notice about the Midwest is that people who live in the northern portions of the Midwest (MN, WI, MI) don't think the southern portions (southern OH, IN, IL, MO, KS) are really part of the Midwest. People from the eastern portions of the Midwest (OH, IN, MI) don't think the western portions (KS, NE, SD, ND) are really part of the Midwest.

I live in Kansas, which is both in the southern and western portions of the Midwest. 90% of us who actually live in Kansas consider Kansas to be part of the Midwest. But to many people in the northern and eastern parts of the Midwest, Kansas is not part of the Midwest. Why? Because they consider where THEY live to be the "real" Midwest, so the farther away you are from where THEY live, the less Midwest you are.

The worst thing is when they put us in the South. Anyone with basic knowledge of U.S. history would never put Kansas in the South.

I live in Michigan, and I do consider Kansas part of the midwest. Kansas is very different from my part of the midwest as it is in the great plains section of the midwest, and I am in the upper midwest. The midwest is very diverse, with several different sub regions. Most US regions are the same, New England is different than the rest of the NE, the upper south is different from the deep south. The midwest is no different, so no one can claim to be in the "real midwest"
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Old 07-13-2010, 11:50 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
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OK, here is my unique map of the Midwest. A geographer would probably tear this thing to shreds, but it does a good job of representing MY view of the Midwest:

Regions of the Midwest - Google Maps

I tried to accomplish a few things:

1. Minimize the image of "Rust Belt." In terms of actual land area, the "Rust Belt" comprises a tiny percentage of the Midwest. That's why I can't stand the term. Where I live is generally considered Rust Belt, and all I can see is forest and farmland for miles.

2. Maximize the agricultural image of the Midwest. Urbanites like to downplay it, but lets face it: The thing that really ties all of these states together is agriculture. What does northwest Ohio have in common with eastern Nebraska? Cornfields. What does Kansas have in common with Illinois? Cornfields. What does Minnesota have in common with Indiana? Cornfields. Oh, and sprinkle in some Dairy and ranching throughout all of these states too.

3. Give Chicago its own region. Chicago is Chicago. It's the exception in the Midwest, not the rule. When I think of the Midwest, I do not think of Chicago. And Chicagoans don't really identify all that much with the Midwest from what I can tell.
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Old 07-13-2010, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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I agree with your Upper Midwest and Transition Zone, but . . .

I-94 is Rust Belt? Battle Creek, Jackson and Benton Harbor, maybe, but I don't see how Kalamazoo is Rust Belt, it's much more agrarian.

Most of your "Lower Midwest" is the Upper South. If Cooter, Missouri is Midwest then I'm a ham sandwich.

The Eastern transition zone should probably go further west into Ohio.

Don't pay so much attention to state lines. Regions don't (usually) begin and end at state borders.

Otherwise, good map.
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Old 07-13-2010, 12:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
OK, here is my unique map of the Midwest. A geographer would probably tear this thing to shreds, but it does a good job of representing MY view of the Midwest:

Regions of the Midwest - Google Maps

I tried to accomplish a few things:

1. Minimize the image of "Rust Belt." In terms of actual land area, the "Rust Belt" comprises a tiny percentage of the Midwest. That's why I can't stand the term. Where I live is generally considered Rust Belt, and all I can see is forest and farmland for miles.

2. Maximize the agricultural image of the Midwest. Urbanites like to downplay it, but lets face it: The thing that really ties all of these states together is agriculture. What does northwest Ohio have in common with eastern Nebraska? Cornfields. What does Kansas have in common with Illinois? Cornfields. What does Minnesota have in common with Indiana? Cornfields. Oh, and sprinkle in some Dairy and ranching throughout all of these states too.

3. Give Chicago its own region. Chicago is Chicago. It's the exception in the Midwest, not the rule. When I think of the Midwest, I do not think of Chicago. And Chicagoans don't really identify all that much with the Midwest from what I can tell.
It is an interesting twist basing it around economy and land use. Although if the West and East edges are transition zones, shouldn't the Lower Midwest be the Southern Transition zone? It looks like the Western Transition zone lines up to where pivot irrigation is dominant while the Lower Midwest lines up mostly to where large scale agriculture stops. (also close to maximum extent of glaciers in ice age too)

Also reccomend not using state lines in this since most of the regions either bleed over into nearby states or in the case of the Lower Midwest, doesn't go that far South in Missouri.

Overall I like the idea of a map based on land use and economy since it does have a strong impact on culture.
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Old 07-13-2010, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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I-70 is generally a good divider between Midwest and South, except around major cities St. Louis, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Columbus and Dayton/Cincinnati, where the Lower Midwest goes a little farther south (to the Ohio River in Cincinnati).
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Old 07-13-2010, 04:19 PM
 
Location: MINNESOTA
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^^
Interesting, but the only part of Minnesota that should be included is the 'Arrowhead' region..
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