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Old 07-08-2010, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,629,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
If you're using latitudinal lines, then the northern half of Iowa would be in the Upper Midwest; if you travel east from northern Iowa, you'd wind up in Wisconsin....in some circles, Chicago might be the southern end of the Upper Midwest, but only if you're splitting hairs...I think that, culturally speaking, Chicago has more in common with Milwaukee than with St. Louis or Kansas City..
Yeah but Milwaukee is 50 miles away from Chicago. You could make the argument that St. Louis is more similar to Chicago than Minneapolis.
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Old 07-08-2010, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,522 posts, read 7,472,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
No. If anything, southern Michigan and Wisconsin are Lower Midwest. I'm from southern Michigan, so I know this - it's much more like Indiana and Ohio than Minnesota. Nowhere in Ohio and Indiana are Upper Midwest, maybe EXTREME northern Iowa within a few miles of the Minnesota border is Upper Midwest. People from southern Iowa have a slight Southern twang, much like those from central Ohio and Indiana.


I see your getting some disagrements about this statement, but you have a point. No where in Ohio or Indiana can claim to be upper midwest. They are lower midwest for sure. I live in Michigan, and I also agree that parts of southern Michigan do have some lower midwest attributes. I think we would be talking about areas in Michigan that are considerably south of Grand Rapids, Lansing and Flint. The I-94 corridor would be a good boundry for the area we are talking about. Im in the Saginaw valley, and It seems pretty solid upper midwest here, but further downstate does seems alot like Indiana. Places like Marshal, Monroe, Three Rivers seem to fit in better with Ohio and Indiana than they do Michigan. Wisconsin has the same issue, south of Milwalkee is more like Chicago than the rest of Wisconsin.
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Old 07-08-2010, 09:11 PM
 
400 posts, read 869,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Cann View Post
Didn't you read, Flyingwriter is from SOUTHERN MICHIGAN. Follow Flyingwriter's threads and posts, they are all consistent with agreeing with or giving great insights to Michigan or midwest topics.

I have family in Southern Michigan, and I think it's safe to say that Columbus and Ann Arbor fall into one category and Fargo and Duluth in another.

North of Akron? Ok then nevermind

So you're saying pretty much Akron, OH and Bismarck, ND have similar characteristics? More similar than Akron and Huntington?
His/her location says Plymouth, Minnesota. The bottom line is Michigan, I don't care if it's "southern" Michigan, central Michigan, or northern Michigan, it's in the upper Midwest, not the lower Midwest. There are established definitions for these regions. Geographers have defined regions and given them names. The upper Midwest is a defined geographic region that stretches roughly from northern Ohio through Michigan, northern Indiana, northern Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, North and South Dakota.

People get so wrapped up in their own opinions, when they should be focused on facts and evidence. I posted numerous sources indicating how the term upper Midwest is used and the region that it defines. Other people post their opinions and act like it's equally valid with respect to established facts.

Also, it is unfair to compare the two most distant cities in a region, because the cities or places on the periphery of any region are by definition peripheral. So comparing Akron to Bismarck is inherently unfair. It is more accurate to compare cities such as Lima, OH to Waterloo, IA or to compare Cleveland, OH to Milwaukee, WI to see if they fit in the same region.

Last edited by Blue Earth; 07-08-2010 at 09:32 PM..
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Old 07-08-2010, 09:19 PM
 
400 posts, read 869,452 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
If you're using latitudinal lines, then the northern half of Iowa would be in the Upper Midwest; if you travel east from northern Iowa, you'd wind up in Wisconsin....in some circles, Chicago might be the southern end of the Upper Midwest, but only if you're splitting hairs...I think that, culturally speaking, Chicago has more in common with Milwaukee than with St. Louis or Kansas City..
Which is why Kansas City and Saint Louis are not in the upper Midwest. The entire state of Missouri is lower Midwest, as are the southern halves (at least) of Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,152,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Cann View Post
Didn't you read, Flyingwriter is from SOUTHERN MICHIGAN. Follow Flyingwriter's threads and posts, they are all consistent with agreeing with or giving great insights to Michigan or midwest topics.

I have family in Southern Michigan, and I think it's safe to say that Columbus and Ann Arbor fall into one category and Fargo and Duluth in another.

North of Akron? Ok then nevermind


So you're saying pretty much Akron, OH and Bismarck, ND have similar characteristics? More similar than Akron and Huntington?
What are you talking about? Most definitions of "Upper Midwest" don't even include the Dakotas (that's the Great Plains). MI, WI, and MN are the core states of the Upper Midwest with the northern parts of IA, IL, IN, and OH included as well. Cleveland, South Bend, Chicago, and Dubuque are all very much Upper Midwestern cities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I see your getting some disagrements about this statement, but you have a point. No where in Ohio or Indiana can claim to be upper midwest. They are lower midwest for sure. I live in Michigan, and I also agree that parts of southern Michigan do have some lower midwest attributes. I think we would be talking about areas in Michigan that are considerably south of Grand Rapids, Lansing and Flint. The I-94 corridor would be a good boundry for the area we are talking about. Im in the Saginaw valley, and It seems pretty solid upper midwest here, but further downstate does seems alot like Indiana. Places like Marshal, Monroe, Three Rivers seem to fit in better with Ohio and Indiana than they do Michigan. Wisconsin has the same issue, south of Milwalkee is more like Chicago than the rest of Wisconsin.
First of all, Milwaukee is only 40 miles from the IL border. And secondly, I would counter that Chicago seems more like it belongs in WI than in IL.
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:08 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,426,330 times
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I have never heard anyone in general conversation refer to Ohio or Indiana as the Upper Midwest. Many self-described "upper Midwest" organizations tend to cover MN, WI, MI's UP, and often South and North Dakota. Whether a geographer calls northern Ohio the "upper Midwest" is pretty much a moot point in most settings, as most of society doesn't use that definition.
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,400,657 times
Reputation: 1305
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
What are you talking about? Most definitions of "Upper Midwest" don't even include the Dakotas (that's the Great Plains). MI, WI, and MN are the core states of the Upper Midwest with the northern parts of IA, IL, IN, and OH included as well. Cleveland, South Bend, Chicago, and Dubuque are all very much Upper Midwestern cities.



First of all, Milwaukee is only 40 miles from the IL border. And secondly, I would counter that Chicago seems more like it belongs in WI than in IL.
What? No.
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:21 PM
 
1,080 posts, read 1,985,368 times
Reputation: 597
The upper Midwest is as follows:

-Minnesota
-Wisconsin outside of Madison, Milwaukee, and the rest of the SE corner of the state
-UP Michigan
-The extreme eastern edge of South Dakota, including Sioux Falls
-The extreme eastern edge of North Dakota, including Fargo and Grand Forks
-The extreme northern edge of Iowa including Dubuque and Mason City could make a case

In no way is any part of Illinois, Southern Iowa, or the lower peninsula of Michigan part of the Upper Midwest, let alone Indiana or Ohio. Chicago is not in the upper midwest, milwaukee is not, des moines is not, detroit is not, and fort wayne, toledo, and cleveland definitely are not.

Last edited by MN55; 07-08-2010 at 10:50 PM..
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,400,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
The upper Midwest is as follows:

-Minnesota
-Wisconsin outside of Madison, Milwaukee, and the rest of the SE corner of the state
-UP Michigan
-The extreme eastern edge of South Dakota, including Sioux City
-The extreme eastern edge of North Dakota, including Fargo and Grand Forks
-The extreme northern edge of Iowa including Dubuque and Mason City could make a case

In no way is any part of Illinois, Southern Iowa, or the lower peninsula of Michigan part of the Upper Midwest, let alone Indiana or Ohio. Chicago is not in the upper midwest, milwaukee is not, des moines is not, detroit is not, and fort wayne, toledo, and cleveland definitely are not.
Upper Midwest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:36 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,075,131 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
The upper Midwest is as follows:

-Minnesota
-Wisconsin outside of Madison, Milwaukee, and the rest of the SE corner of the state
-UP Michigan
-The extreme eastern edge of South Dakota, including Sioux City
-The extreme eastern edge of North Dakota, including Fargo and Grand Forks
-The extreme northern edge of Iowa including Dubuque and Mason City could make a case

In no way is any part of Illinois, Southern Iowa, or the lower peninsula of Michigan part of the Upper Midwest, let alone Indiana or Ohio. Chicago is not in the upper midwest, milwaukee is not, des moines is not, detroit is not, and fort wayne, toledo, and cleveland definitely are not.
Your theory is interesting, but flawed. All of WI and MI are in the upper Midwest. Milwaukee is north of Dubuque, and Sioux City is in Iowa, not South Dakota. To say that a "part" of WI is lower Midwest, makes no sense whatsoever. Look at a map, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Indiana and parts of IL and Iowa are lower Midwest.
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