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Old 07-09-2010, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
Reputation: 3232

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
Midwest Boundaries - Google Maps

Here's a map that I feel better illustrates the different cultural regions of the Midwest.
This is a great post. It definitely gets Michigan and Wisconsin.

About the Great Plains: Why isn't more of Iowa red? Iowa is pretty much entirely a Great Plains state, with the exception of the eastern bluffs. I get why western MN and ND are red (they are physically on the Great Plains), but those areas have more in common culturally (not physically) with (eastern) Minnesota and the rest of the Upper Midwest than they do with Kansas or Nebraska. North Dakota has a stronger "Minnesota" accent than Minnesota, and they love their hockey, hotdish and Lutheran churches.
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,935 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
I never said they don't go way up North and of course Door County and definitely Lake Geneva.



Being from Chicago, I know where people go and the two biggest draws are Door County and The Dells. Again, I never said people don't go way up North, but

Nice claim without a source.

You are going off on tangents that have nothing to do with what I said. I never said that geography doesn't play a role in where people go and I never brought up vacationing, yet you decided to bring it up. What I said is that you were wrong when saying Chicago is more like Wisconsin and that the rest of Illinois isn't green and doesn't have trees. Do you get that?

Now before you go post more nonsense, why don't you go back and read my posts.
You're the one going off in all directions here not me. I said Chicagoland had more trees and more water features than Downstate IL, which is an undisputable fact.

You were the one who said: "since when does people's vacationing choices have to do with what a state looks like?"

How a state looks goes hand-in-hand with its geography.

I mentioned tourism and where Chicagoans like to vacation because it shows what state they prefer to be in when they're not in Chicago.
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:18 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,116,144 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
Here's a rough sketch of what I'm thinking:

Red = Upper Midwest
Orange = Rust Belt/Central Midwest
Yellow = Lower Midwest
Purple = Great Plains/Beginning of the West



Souix City, Dubuque, Madison, Grand Rapids, and Saginaw are kind of on the boundry between the central and upper midwest although I would classify all these cities as being more Central Midwest. Springfield, Indianapolis, and Columbus are around where the central and lower midwest meet. Bismark and Minot is kind of where the Midwest starts to end and the West begins.
Interesting map, the only issue is sticking with state lines in this since there are some areas outside of the states shown that are more or less tied to a Midwestern region and a couple of places in the states that are not really.

For example, the purple region is arguably a whole seperate part of the country. It also extends west up to at or near the front range of the Rockies and South into parts of Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle. (there is a North/South gradient in this region as well but hard to determine at times due to population density issues)

In the East the Central Midwest region could extend into parts of West Virginia, Pennsyvania and New York which shares similar traits. I am thinking the area around Wheeling, WV, Pittsburgh and Erie PA, and areas arond the Great Lakes in New York.

Areas in states listed that aren't really Midwestern to not at all are mainly confined to Missouri. The bootheel area is more similar to areas around Memphis and is the northernmost end of the Mississippi Delta region. Areas of Southern Missouri area also a seperate cultural region that is at least heavily mixed with Southern culture or is one, just the issue of where it starts is a big one but at least the lowest 15% to third of the state is mostly part of that region.

In terms of the idea of a Upper/Middle/Lower/Plains division, what is the criteria and definitions for determining what area is what? I am thinking that factors that are considered from people's already posted definiton are based on population and density/culture and ethnic background/land use/politics/religion (very important for determining Lower Midwest and where a Midwest/South boundary exists)
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 6,395,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
You're the one going off in all directions here not me. I said Chicagoland had more trees and more water features than Downstate IL, which is an undisputable fact.

You were the one who said: "since when does people's vacationing choices have to do with what a state looks like?"

How a state looks goes hand-in-hand with its geography.

I mentioned tourism and where Chicagoans like to vacation because it shows what state they prefer to be in when they're not in Chicago.
That is a straight out lie. And you keep ignoring parts of my post because you know they are.

Just look at my original post to see how you have bastardized what I was saying:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/14960903-post34.html

You clearly know what you are talking about.



FYI this is in Southern Illinois (which isn't Chicagoland).
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
This is a great post. It definitely gets Michigan and Wisconsin.

About the Great Plains: Why isn't more of Iowa red? Iowa is pretty much entirely a Great Plains state, with the exception of the eastern bluffs. I get why western MN and ND are red (they are physically on the Great Plains), but those areas have more in common culturally (not physically) with (eastern) Minnesota and the rest of the Upper Midwest than they do with Kansas or Nebraska. North Dakota has a stronger "Minnesota" accent than Minnesota, and they love their hockey, hotdish and Lutheran churches.
Aside from the accent thing, I could say the same things about those darn Iowegians. Culturally, Des Moines and Iowa City are much more progressive, more along the lines of Madison and Minneapolis, than the rest of the Great Plains. And a city like Cedar Rapids could just as easily be located in MN or WI as it could in IA.
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
Reputation: 3232
Here's my take on Midwest boundaries.

This SHOULD work now:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en...ae6ad91d9b789b
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:27 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,116,144 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
That is a straight out lie.

Just look at my original post to see how you have bastardized what I was saying:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/14960903-post34.html

You clearly know what you are talking about.



FYI this is in Southern Illinois (which isn't Chicagoland).
I think a lot of people from Chicago don't know that the Southernmost part of the state is like that. The area South of I-64 and nearby starts becoming less flat and has more hilly and forested (suprisingly as well a number of marshes and wetlands). Also culturally it really starts changing as you can tell you are rapidly approaching the Bible Belt. (listen to the radio dial driving around there and you can tell and also the number of Baptists and Evangelicals in general start increasing to where a number of counties in Southern Illinois they are the largest religious group which would by near definition put it in the Lower Midwest/Transitional Zone/Upper South)
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,562,228 times
Reputation: 3232
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjacobeclark View Post
Aside from the accent thing, I could say the same things about those darn Iowegians. Culturally, Des Moines and Iowa City are much more progressive, more along the lines of Madison and Minneapolis, than the rest of the Great Plains. And a city like Cedar Rapids could just as easily be located in MN or WI as it could in IA.
Fair enough, but cities like Lawrence, KS and Wichita, KS are still fairly progressive cities in the Plains.
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:31 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,116,144 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Fair enough, but cities like Lawrence, KS and Wichita, KS are still fairly progressive cities in the Plains.
Well Lawrence is a college town which tends to be that way relative to the surrounding area. But is Wichita really that progressive? I always pictured it as near Bible Belt conservative.
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Old 07-09-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,146,935 times
Reputation: 1113
Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
That is a straight out lie.

Just look at my original post to see how you have bastardized what I was saying:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/14960903-post34.html

You clearly know what you are talking about.



FYI this is in Southern Illinois (which isn't Chicagoland).
Thanks to this site, we've all seen countless pictures of Shawnee National Forest. I'm pretty sure it's the only non-flat, non-open part of Downstate IL, that also happens to be next to the Ozarks.

McHenry County and Lake County in IL look just like their neighbors Rock County and Walworth County in WI. Why are you having such a hard time accepting that Chicago has more similarities with WI than to its own state?
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