U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-07-2010, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,564,992 times
Reputation: 3232

Advertisements

People always talk about the South (or Northeast, or West) as not being "monolithic" regions, but no one ever mentions anything about the Midwest having diversity. To the rest of the country, we're corn, cows and snow. The truth is that the Midwest has a lot of internal variation. We have mountains, beaches, cities, wilderness, snow, subtropics, forest, prairie and everything in between.

People flip out when mentioning that Dallas has anything in common with Charlotte, but do people really think that Caruthersville, Missouri has anything in common with International Falls, Minnesota? What about Rapid City, South Dakota and Youngstown, Ohio? Dodge City, Kansas and Detroit, Michigan? These cities are all very different in culture, natural setting, climate, accent (or lack thereof) and economy. The Midwest is probably the most varied region in the country - much more so than the South and Northeast, and possibly more than the West.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-07-2010, 09:48 PM
 
Location: North Central Indiana
980 posts, read 2,908,680 times
Reputation: 285
Midwest is underrated in many ways
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2010, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,515 posts, read 7,459,650 times
Reputation: 10919
The midwest is certainly not monolitithic. The lower midwest (Oh, Ind, Ill, Ia, Misouri) is very different from the upper midwest (Mi, Wi, Mn,). The plains states are different from the other two. The lower midwest has more southern influence, that is obvious to anyone who has listened to people along the Ohio river talk. The upper midwest is more influenced by German, Dutch, and Scandanavian ancestory that is dominant here. The upper midwest is also physically different in some ways from the rest of the midwest. Lots of lakes and woods in that area. The plains states are different as they are much more open, and less populated. No region in America is monolithic, nor is any one state. Even within my state of Michigan there is alot of diversity within this states boundries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2010, 10:19 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,961,646 times
Reputation: 6679
The Midwest does have a fair amount of variety. On the whole Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin are a good deal more liberal than Kansas, Nebraska or the Dakotas. North Dakota looks to be one of the most Lutheran places in the country. Minnesota and North Dakota have a strong Scandinavian heritage that I wouldn't associate to Missouri or Illinois. Michigan and Illinois have some pretty large cities but in the Dakotas and Iowa the cities are mostly medium-sized to small. The accents I think are also a fair amount different from Duluth, Minnesota to Wichita, Kansas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 11:31 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,154,265 times
Reputation: 22373
Kansas City and eastern Kansas (in KCMO metro) are the best kept secrets of the whole country, in my opinion. I am a native North Carolinian and fell in love with the KCMO metro, particularly where I lived in Johnson County, KS. But I spent a lot of time in MO b/c hubby is from St. Louis, and I also found the historic areas in western MO to be very interesting.

There is great variety in the midwest. The agrarian parts of the midwest are actually as comparable to the agrarian areas of the South as to each other. Small towns, whether located in the South or the Midwest, still are socially about the same. Friday nites are made for local high school football games in both areas, lol!

You look at Milwaukee, Des Moines, Kansas City . . . three cities I am very familiar with - all are terrific places to live and all have some similarities but definitely their own vibe.

I love the midwest and wasn't ready to move back South (Charlotte) even tho I have a huge family here. I really do believe folks often overlook all that the midwest has to offer - especially a good cost of living and fine places to raise a family and be part of a community - many of which have low crime rates and lower unemployment than where I am right now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 12:33 PM
 
400 posts, read 868,760 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
The lower midwest (Oh, Ind, Ill, Ia, Misouri) is very different from the upper midwest (Mi, Wi, Mn,).
The boundary between the Lower Midwest and the Upper Midwest doesn't conform to state boundaries. I would say most of Iowa is Upper Midwest. Some parts of northern Illinois, northern Indiana, and northern Ohio are also Upper Midwest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,564,992 times
Reputation: 3232
No. If anything, southern Michigan and Wisconsin are Lower Midwest. I'm from southern Michigan, so I know this - it's much more like Indiana and Ohio than Minnesota. Nowhere in Ohio and Indiana are Upper Midwest, maybe EXTREME northern Iowa within a few miles of the Minnesota border is Upper Midwest. People from southern Iowa have a slight Southern twang, much like those from central Ohio and Indiana.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 05:36 PM
 
400 posts, read 868,760 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
No. If anything, southern Michigan and Wisconsin are Lower Midwest. I'm from southern Michigan, so I know this - it's much more like Indiana and Ohio than Minnesota. Nowhere in Ohio and Indiana are Upper Midwest, maybe EXTREME northern Iowa within a few miles of the Minnesota border is Upper Midwest. People from southern Iowa have a slight Southern twang, much like those from central Ohio and Indiana.
Let's look at the facts.

Wikipedia, "Upper Midwest":

Quote:
The Upper Midwest is a region of the United States with no uniformly agreed-upon boundaries, but it almost always lies within the U.S. Census Bureau's Midwest region, which includes the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana. By some definitions, it extends into North and South Dakota and Iowa. Historically, prior to about 1880, "upper Midwest" meant the region that includes Ohio, Indiana, and lower Michigan.

The National Weather Service defines its Upper Midwest as the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

The United States Geological Survey uses two different Upper Midwest regions:

The USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center considers it to be the six states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, which comprise the watersheds of the upper Mississippi River and upper Great Lakes.

The USGS Mineral Resources Program considers the area to contain Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

The Association for Institutional Research in the Upper Midwest includes the states of Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and the upper peninsula of Michigan in the region.
Link: Upper Midwest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Also check North American English Dialects map: American English Dialects

I won't post the map. Click the link to see for yourself. Study the Northern accent/Midland accent boundaries. Northern accent is upper Midwest. Midland accent is lower Midwest. This is elementary cultural geography.

All of Iowa north of Des Moines is upper Midwest. All of Illinois north of Peoria is upper Midwest. ALL of Wisconsin and ALL of Michigan are upper Midwest, period. Indiana north of Fort Wayne is upper Midwest. Ohio north of Akron is upper Midwest.

Southern Illinois, southern Indiana, southern Ohio, all of Missouri, maybe southern Iowa are lower Midwest.

ALL of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan are upper Midwest. Leave it to someone in Minnesota to think that southern Wisconsin and southern Michigan are "lower Midwest".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 06:48 PM
 
Location: MINNESOTA
1,178 posts, read 2,358,857 times
Reputation: 499
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeStater View Post
Let's look at the facts.

Wikipedia, "Upper Midwest":

Link: Upper Midwest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Also check North American English Dialects map: American English Dialects

I won't post the map. Click the link to see for yourself. Study the Northern accent/Midland accent boundaries. Northern accent is upper Midwest. Midland accent is lower Midwest. This is elementary cultural geography.

All of Iowa north of Des Moines is upper Midwest. All of Illinois north of Peoria is upper Midwest. ALL of Wisconsin and ALL of Michigan are upper Midwest, period. Indiana north of Fort Wayne is upper Midwest. Ohio north of Akron is upper Midwest.

Southern Illinois, southern Indiana, southern Ohio, all of Missouri, maybe southern Iowa are lower Midwest.

ALL of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan are upper Midwest. Leave it to someone in Minnesota to think that southern Wisconsin and southern Michigan are "lower Midwest".
Didn't you read, Flyingwriter is from SOUTHERN MICHIGAN. Follow Flyingwriter's threads and posts, they are all consistent with agreeing with or giving great insights to Michigan or midwest topics.

I have family in Southern Michigan, and I think it's safe to say that Columbus and Ann Arbor fall into one category and Fargo and Duluth in another.

North of Akron? Ok then nevermind


So you're saying pretty much Akron, OH and Bismarck, ND have similar characteristics? More similar than Akron and Huntington?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2010, 08:04 PM
 
7,595 posts, read 9,448,275 times
Reputation: 8954
If you're using latitudinal lines, then the northern half of Iowa would be in the Upper Midwest; if you travel east from northern Iowa, you'd wind up in Wisconsin....in some circles, Chicago might be the southern end of the Upper Midwest, but only if you're splitting hairs...I think that, culturally speaking, Chicago has more in common with Milwaukee than with St. Louis or Kansas City..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top