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Old 07-13-2010, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,677,759 times
Reputation: 7280

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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
The issue is that the Piedmont is becoming so different from the Deep South and becoming moreso over time. Also there are some differences pre-transplants that did exist as a function of terrain which effected things. I have to ask if the area gets culturally swamped so long that it is no longer Southern or just slightly so. And that aspect has historically happened, look at how all of Missouri was descibed especially St. Louis area.

The idea of places becoming less Southern is a popular topic, but are there places that are or could become more Southern in the future? Of course basic definition drift could also happen as well.
The Deep South has never been monolithic though; so how is the Piedmont region becoming different???
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Old 07-13-2010, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,677,759 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
oh my god! you are driving me crazy with this. the changes that you see in houston (having a large international population; politically moderate, etc.) are due to it being a big city. it is not the only city like this. atlanta has a large international population and is also politically moderate. is it not the deep south either?

you have to look at the ROOT of the city. and despite changes to the urban fabric of houston, it was originally a black and white, PROTESTANT, cotton town. just like the rest of the south

the reason that cities like birmingham and charlotte still have a heavy concentration of southern culture is because they are much smaller cities. what do you think houston was like decades ago?
The difference is that Houston is located in Texas; which is not considered Deep south. Some argue East Texas is, but Houston is NOT East Texas.
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Old 07-13-2010, 12:02 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
The difference is that Houston is located in Texas; which is not considered Deep south. Some argue East Texas is, but Houston is NOT East Texas.
for most of houston's history as a city, yes it was indeed considered part of east texas. not until recent times have people begun to argue that

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Texas

and it's not a matter of arguing whether or not east texas is part of the deep south. IT IS without a doubt the deep south
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Old 07-13-2010, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,677,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
for most of houston's history as a city, yes it was indeed considered part of east texas. not until recent times have people begun to argue that

East Texas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

and it's not a matter of arguing whether or not east texas is part of the deep south. IT IS without a doubt the deep south
It's been argued for a while; Houston has always associated itself with the gulf coast more than East Texas. I've never heard anyone refer to Houston as East Texas except people from East Texas.
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Old 07-13-2010, 12:35 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,117,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
The Deep South has never been monolithic though; so how is the Piedmont region becoming different???
Well considering the rapid population growth occuring of people with vastly different culture to the point where they are dominant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
but we have to remember that the piedmont south is more than just raleigh or charlotte. it's also cities like augusta, ga and aiken, sc. and when you look at what all entails the "deep south", these two cities fit the bill perfectly.
Generally I am referring to the area mostly along the I-85 corridor which doesn't include Augusta and Aiken. Piedmont is generally a term in my case representing the areas that are rapidly growing by means of people outside the region moving in. This is causing the culture to over time become more different. I do suspect that for the two cities you do mention along with Columbia, they might start having the same thing happen to them in the next 10-20 years.
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Old 07-13-2010, 12:50 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
It's been argued for a while; Houston has always associated itself with the gulf coast more than East Texas. I've never heard anyone refer to Houston as East Texas except people from East Texas.
no it has not been argued for a while. like i said, for most of houston's history as a city it has been included in east texas and for good reason. only because of the changes it has experienced as a metropolis is it being argued today

and explain to me how it isn't possible to be gulf coastal and east texas at the same time?

and gulf coastal mississippi and alabama are still a part of the deep south aren't they. so what does houston's location have to do with anything?
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Old 07-13-2010, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,677,759 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
no it has not been argued for a while. like i said, for most of houston's history as a city it has been included in east texas and for good reason. only because of the changes it has experienced as a metropolis is it being argued today

and explain to me how it isn't possible to be gulf coastal and east texas at the same time?

and gulf coastal mississippi and alabama are still a part of the deep south aren't they. so what does houston's location have to do with anything?
You're the first person I've ever heard claim Houston as East Texas. Houston location is different because it's in Texas and Texas isn't known as deep south.
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Old 07-13-2010, 01:02 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
You're the first person I've ever heard claim Houston as East Texas.
because most people don't see it that way today. what i'm telling you is that the root of houston's culture is very much east texas. period

did you even bother clicking the link i gave you? it's all right there in plain english

Quote:
Houston location is different because it's in Texas and Texas isn't known as deep south.
the east texas part is
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Old 07-13-2010, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
4,135 posts, read 7,190,651 times
Reputation: 2149
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
no it has not been argued for a while. like i said, for most of houston's history as a city it has been included in east texas and for good reason. only because of the changes it has experienced as a metropolis is it being argued today

and explain to me how it isn't possible to be gulf coastal and east texas at the same time?

and gulf coastal mississippi and alabama are still a part of the deep south aren't they. so what does houston's location have to do with anything?
Houston isn't part of East Texas but southeast Texas...Houston doesn't even resemble East Texas. I have to agree with Jluke on this one...My grandfather from Marshall, Texas and has never heard Houston refered to as east Texas.



http://pics2.city-data.com/city/maps/fr1573.png
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Old 07-13-2010, 01:11 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
Reputation: 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
Houston isn't part of East Texas but southeast Texas...Houston doesn't even resemble East Texas. I have to agree with Jluke on this one...My grandfather from Marshall, Texas and has never heard Houston refered to as east Texas.



http://pics2.city-data.com/city/maps/fr1573.png
how insightful. "yeah, it doesn't look like it, so it can't be it". once again, FOR MOST OF HOUSTON'S HISTORY, IT HAS BEEN CONSIDERED PART OF EAST TEXAS. that is FACT.

oh, and is not called southeast texas? what is this obsession people have with thinking that east texas has to be this solid, monolithic area?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southeast_Texas
southeast texas is a subregion of east texas. what's so hard to understand about that?
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