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Old 07-13-2010, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
Reputation: 9577

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
wrong. for most of houston's history it was culturally akin to east texas (except for the coastal characteristics). how many times do i have to say this?

now explain to me why the gulf coast absolutely has to be separated from east texas. why is it so difficult for people to just include the houston area as a subregion? southeast texas is not culturally similar to the rest of the coastal bend
You can keep saying it until the sky turns green. The reason why I, jluke, and kdogg817 is questioning this is because we were never taught this in our 7th grade history class. We never looked at Houston as an East Texas city. And I've done many research on this as well on projects after this grade. Houston has been completely different from the rest of East Texas for the past 80 years.

As far as Southeast Texas and Gulf Coast. This is why I brought up many titles. This is where Houston markets itself. Hardly does it ever market itself as an East Texas city. They look at themselves as strictly Gulf Coast or Coastal Bend or the Houston area. They have as much in common with Corpus Christi as they do Beaumont but have very little in common with Marshall.
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Old 07-13-2010, 07:47 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
You can keep saying it until the sky turns green. The reason why I, jluke, and kdogg817 is questioning this is because we were never taught this in our 7th grade history class. We never looked at Houston as an East Texas city. And I've done many research on this as well on projects after this grade. Houston has been completely different from the rest of East Texas for the past 80 years.
you weren't paying much attention in class, then (or had a bad teacher). the books don't define the coastal bend or the piney woods/east texas as cultural regions. they define them as geographic regions. two different aspects

the gulf coast is not exactly the same as upper east texas, that's for certain; but you, jluke, and kdogg have yet to explain specifically what separates the gulf coast from east texas


Quote:
As far as Southeast Texas and Gulf Coast. This is why I brought up many titles. This is where Houston markets itself. Hardly does it ever market itself as an East Texas city. They look at themselves as strictly Gulf Coast or Coastal Bend or the Houston area. They have as much in common with Corpus Christi as they do Beaumont but have very little in common with Marshall.
houston and the golden triangle are the east texas part of the coastal bend. the coastal bend/gulf coast is not one monolithic cultural region in and of itself
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Old 07-13-2010, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,677,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
you weren't paying much attention in class, then (or had a bad teacher). the books don't define the coastal bend or the piney woods/east texas as cultural regions. they define them as geographic regions. two different aspects

the gulf coast is not exactly the same as upper east texas, that's for certain; but you, jluke, and kdogg have yet to explain specifically what separates the gulf coast from east texas




houston and the golden triangle are the east texas part of the coastal bend. the coastal bend/gulf coast is not one monolithic cultural region in and of itself
What separates them is the Cajun/Creole influence and the fairly large catholic populations.

No; it's just that Houston has never really been East Texas. It's located in the Eastern half of Texas, but it's never claimed to be East Texas. Like I said; only people who claim it are people from East Texas.
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Old 07-13-2010, 07:55 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
What separates them is the Cajun/Creole influence and the fairly large catholic populations.
so in other words, southern louisiana isn't really louisiana afterall?

Quote:
No; it's just that Houston has never really been East Texas. It's located in the Eastern half of Texas, but it's never claimed to be East Texas. Like I said; only people who claim it are people from East Texas.
you say "never" as if you were around decades ago. how do you know what houston was considered in the early-mid 20th century?
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Old 07-13-2010, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
you weren't paying much attention in class, then (or had a bad teacher). the books don't define the coastal bend or the piney woods/east texas as cultural regions. they define them as geographic regions. two different aspects
Oh no I payed attention in class and I loved Mr. Wilson who was a great teacher and I remember his lectures and never once stated that Houston is the same East Texas as most of us know as now. I remember this conversation coming up on the old down-south.com back in 2001 and 2002 and everybody from the Tyler, Longview, Marshall area differentiated their part of Texas and the Houston area. Hell, they didn't look at themselves as the same as Beaumont but that's another topic.



Quote:
the gulf coast is not exactly the same as upper east texas, that's for certain; but you, jluke, and kdogg have yet to explain specifically what separates the gulf coast from east texas
Culturally, they are the same but that is it. By influence they are different. Politically they are different. Religiously they are different. Topography wise, Houston has some of the Piney woods in it. But also swamps, flat shrubby land, and Palm Trees in it as well. Economically, now, Houston is different than East Texas. I will point out that Oil is big in both areas but Houston is big in many other industries which includes obvious things because they are on the Gulf. That's what separates the Gulf Coast from East Texas. Again, Houston has more in common with Beaumont and Corpus Christi than it does Tyler, Longview, or Marshall.


Quote:
houston and the golden triangle are the east texas part of the coastal bend. the coastal bend/gulf coast is not one monolithic cultural region in and of itself
Never said it was. I will say that this area is much different than the Piney Woods and East Texas that again MOST Texans refer to as.
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Old 07-13-2010, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
so in other words, southern louisiana isn't really louisiana afterall?


you say "never" as if you were around decades ago. how do you know what houston was considered in the early-mid 20th century?
Look up a search on this board. Heck, ask WestbankNola. Many Louisianians do say that Southern Louisiana is VERY different from Central and Northern Louisiana. Lake Charles and Lafayette has more in common with each other than they do Shreveport and Alexandria.
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Old 07-13-2010, 08:08 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
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it's so funny because this makes me think about those drives i used to make from san antonio to houston, and feeling the distinct change in vibe (somewhere around columbus). with the trees getting noticeably taller, the forests more filled out, the terrain flatter, the air more humid. i remember feeling each time like, "okay, now i'm definitely in the south". in fact the feeling was pretty much just like the one i would get as a kid making those family road trips from texas to south carolina, as we would go thru mississippi

oh, and while driving, once you can find about 2 or 3 black gospel stations, that oughta give you some indication that you're in the SOUTH lol
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Old 07-13-2010, 08:16 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
Reputation: 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Oh no I payed attention in class and I loved Mr. Wilson who was a great teacher and I remember his lectures and never once stated that Houston is the same East Texas as most of us know as now. I remember this conversation coming up on the old down-south.com back in 2001 and 2002 and everybody from the Tyler, Longview, Marshall area differentiated their part of Texas and the Houston area. Hell, they didn't look at themselves as the same as Beaumont but that's another topic.

Culturally, they are the same but that is it. By influence they are different. Politically they are different. Religiously they are different. Topography wise, Houston has some of the Piney woods in it. But also swamps, flat shrubby land, and Palm Trees in it as well. Economically, now, Houston is different than East Texas. I will point out that Oil is big in both areas but Houston is big in many other industries which includes obvious things because they are on the Gulf. That's what separates the Gulf Coast from East Texas. Again, Houston has more in common with Beaumont and Corpus Christi than it does Tyler, Longview, or Marshall.

Never said it was. I will say that this area is much different than the Piney Woods and East Texas that again MOST Texans refer to as.
bam! that's all you had to say right there, sir. CULTURE is what the topic of this thread is. not all of that other stuff you're talking about (which is a whole other thread)

and LOL @ you all thinking east texas (and the deep south) for that matter is nothing but an endless sea of tall pines. i could show you pics of east texas and mississippi of areas that look like they belong somewhere around dfw. truth be told, a majority of houston is very lush and wooded. the most common tree is the loblolly pine
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Old 07-13-2010, 08:18 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
Reputation: 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Look up a search on this board. Heck, ask WestbankNola. Many Louisianians do say that Southern Louisiana is VERY different from Central and Northern Louisiana. Lake Charles and Lafayette has more in common with each other than they do Shreveport and Alexandria.
saying that southern louisiana is different from the rest of the state is not the same thing as saying it's not a part of the state

you guys could've just settled for saying that the gulf coast is very different from east texas, but y'all are acting like it's completely disconnected from it
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Old 07-13-2010, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,056,837 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
bam! that's all you had to say right there, sir. CULTURE is what the topic of this thread is. not all of that other stuff you're talking about (which is a whole other thread)
I guess. If all that you're hanging on that Houston is East Texas at heart is all due to just culture, than have it but it is hanging by a thread.

Quote:
and LOL @ you all thinking east texas (and the deep south) for that matter is nothing but an endless sea of tall pines. i could show you pics of east texas and mississippi of areas that look like they belong somewhere around dfw. truth be told, a majority of houston is very lush and wooded. the most common tree is the loblolly pine
Well for one I never said that and two I really don't care what the rest of the Deep South looks like. As far as what makes up East Texans to most Texans, it's mostly referring to endless sea of tall pines. You can show areas if you like. It's still mostly an area of tall pines. I already know about the areas of Mississippi as well so need to post those. The majority of NORTH and East Houston is very lush and wooded. Not the same for South and West Houston especially the far Southwestern suburbs.
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