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Old 07-13-2010, 10:18 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
Reputation: 1934

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
No, what you kept saying was how Houston is essentially East Texas due to its history which is wrong considering other parts of Texas share the same history as East Texas.
wrong. other parts of texas did not have the stringent role in the confederacy that east texas and houston did. and eastern texas is culturally much more southern as well

Quote:
The reason why I don't consider Houston deep south because I grew up never knowing or learned that it was deep south. I have a hard time relating Houston to the term deep south.
so why tell texreb you agreed with him?

Quote:
I didn't even know East Texas was part of the deep south until I came on to City Data. What I learned in Texas history; the deep south was Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and to a lesser extent Florida and most of my history teachers referred to Texas as the southwest; a few called it the south. However, none called it deep south.
most of the definitions you'll find of the deep south will tell you that it is louisiana, mississippi, alabama, georgia, s. carolina and adjoining areas (i.e. east texas, north florida, and the southern/delta portions of arkansas and tennessee)

how you could believe that louisiana was part of the deep south but not east texas is completely beyond me.
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:19 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 5,229,152 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
No, what you kept saying was how Houston is essentially East Texas due to it's history which is wrong considering other parts of Texas share the same history as East Texas.

The reason why I don't consider Houston deep south because I grew up never knowing or learned that it was deep south. I have a hard time relating Houston to the term deep south.

I didn't even know East Texas was part of the deep south until I came on to City Data. What I learned in Texas history; the deep south was Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and to a lesser extent Florida and most of my history teachers referred to Texas as the southwest; a few called it the south. However, none called it deep south.

But they dont share exactly the same history as east texas...East texas was settled by Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia migrants...Other areas were settled by people from the upper south so culture and folkways will vary a little.

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Old 07-13-2010, 10:24 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 7,584,632 times
Reputation: 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
But they dont share exactly the same history as east texas...East texas was settled by Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia migrants...Other areas were settled by people from the upper south so culture and folkways will vary a little.
awesome map. i'm actually surprised to see so many counties settle by georgians
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:27 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,134,235 times
Reputation: 1407
No wonder Harris, Orange, Chambers, Beaumont and Galveston look more like Louisiana than Texas. Actually, Ft. Bend too to an extent.
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,566,350 times
Reputation: 3232
Not to get off-topic, but I don't think I've ever heard blacks referred to as "Anglo-Americans" before.
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:30 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,134,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Not to get off-topic, but I don't think I've ever heard blacks referred to as "Anglo-Americans" before.
I think that the map is referring to "Anglo" and not "Afro"
Edit: didn't see blacks included on the map at 1st. I have to go with solytaire on that one.
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:33 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 5,229,152 times
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Yeah, I figured someone would bring that up...I suspect they cant really trace where black "settlers" originally came from, for obvious reasons.
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,677,759 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
But they dont share exactly the same history as east texas...East texas was settled by Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia migrants...Other areas were settled by people from the upper south so culture and folkways will vary a little.
Your map proves my point, because it goes into south Texas, as well as North and Central Texas. Thank you.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
wrong. other parts of texas did not have the stringent role in the confederacy that east texas and houston did. and eastern texas is culturally much more southern as well

Wrong.

so why tell texreb you agreed with him?

Well he never exactly said Houston was deep south, but he never said it wasn't either.


most of the definitions you'll find of the deep south will tell you that it is louisiana, mississippi, alabama, georgia, s. carolina and adjoining areas (i.e. east texas, north florida, and the southern/delta portions of arkansas and tennessee)

Never disagreed with this; I said I never knew East Texas was deep south until I started using City Data.

how you could believe that louisiana was part of the deep south but not east texas is completely beyond me.

Location, Location, Location
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:36 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 5,229,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Your map proves my point, because it goes into south Texas, as well as North and Central Texas. Thank you.
No prob...But what point were you trying to make originally?
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Old 07-13-2010, 10:37 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,686,367 times
Reputation: 1869
Looks like Louisianians and Mississippians heavily settled coastal Texas, probably as fisherman or associated marine industries.
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