U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-14-2010, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Augusta, GA ''The fastest rising city in the southeast''
7,285 posts, read 12,324,908 times
Reputation: 802

Advertisements

Yes it maybe southern, but clearly not deep south... You have to drive 35-40 minutes outside of Augusta to some of the burbs to see a good portion of rednecks or confederate flags..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-14-2010, 08:59 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,173,639 times
Reputation: 3642
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
So the 2nd largest amount of slaves were around present day Sugar Land and MO City in 1860..?
Nope, the map looks to me like it's Wharton County. Not Fort Bend.


Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
Come on now folx...
Galveston was the largest slave port west of the Mississippi for goodness sake
Not saying north and Central texas didnt have slavery because they clearly did, but the entry point for slaves was right along the coast by Houston...i dont know if it gets anymore deep south than that, using that criteria
Houston and Galveston were not extremely similar then, nor are they now.
Of course Galveston was the large port for the rest of the state... not just for Houston. This was all before the Port of Houston was created, which is now the large port for the state as well as outside of it (foreign tonnage).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:03 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,131,199 times
Reputation: 1406
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
Nope, the map looks to me like it's Wharton County. Not Fort Bend.
No, that map clearly has Fort Bend and Brazoria having 65-79%
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:16 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,173,639 times
Reputation: 3642
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
No, that map clearly has Fort Bend and Brazoria having 65-79%
Oh, 2nd largest.
Also, Brazoria is Pearland and some coastal cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:18 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 5,227,653 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
Houston and Galveston were not extremely similar then, nor are they now.
Of course Galveston was the large port for the rest of the state... not just for Houston. This was all before the Port of Houston was created, which is now the large port for the state as well as outside of it (foreign tonnage).
Hold on now...you cant on one hand say that Houston isnt similar to east Texas because its gulf coastal, and then say that it isnt similar to a gulf coast suburb 40 minutes away either.

Also, I actually was talking about the Port of Galveston being the largest slave port west of the Mississippi...this does not mean that it was just the largest slave port in Texas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:26 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,173,639 times
Reputation: 3642
Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
Hold on now...you cant on one hand say that Houston isnt similar to east Texas because its gulf coastal, and then say that it isnt similar to a gulf coast suburb 40 minutes away either.
I don't remember insisting on that. I thought I was finished quarreling with you, it's getting really old.

Galveston is unique from the rest of the Texas coast IMO. In early Texas, most of the rest the Texas coast and nearby was rather sleepy while Galveston was bustling. It still has some of the best Victorian architecture in the state. Today it is more touristy and less big-business, while Houston is the exact opposite.

I consider Houston proper and west of it all to be Central South. Not Deep South. Most maps and other info I see tends to agree, except for those maps that have most or all of Texas clumped together as deep south.
Coastal would be another layer on top of that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:32 PM
 
3,424 posts, read 5,227,653 times
Reputation: 1819
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
I don't remember insisting on that. I thought I was finished quarreling with you, it's getting really old.

Galveston is unique from the rest of the Texas coast IMO. In early Texas, most of the rest the Texas coast and nearby was rather sleepy while Galveston was bustling. It still has some of the best Victorian architecture in the state. Today it is more touristy and less big-business, while Houston is the exact opposite.

I consider Houston proper and west of it all to be Central South. Not Deep South. Most maps and other info I see tends to agree, except for those maps that have most or all of Texas clumped together as deep south.
Coastal would be another layer on top of that.
Yeah, Im not quarreling with you..or at least I dont wish to...I dont mind having an ongoing dialogue about it though...Thats kind of what we're here for, no?

But yeah, I see where you're coming from...I disagree with it obviously, but I understand what you're saying
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:35 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,110,365 times
Reputation: 5741
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
I don't remember insisting on that. I thought I was finished quarreling with you, it's getting really old.

Galveston is unique from the rest of the Texas coast IMO. In early Texas, most of the rest the Texas coast and nearby was rather sleepy while Galveston was bustling. It still has some of the best Victorian architecture in the state. Today it is more touristy and less big-business, while Houston is the exact opposite.

I consider Houston proper and west of it all to be Central South. Not Deep South. Most maps and other info I see tends to agree, except for those maps that have most or all of Texas clumped together as deep south.
Coastal would be another layer on top of that.
Just as a note in passing, during that early era, Galveston touted itself as "The Wall Street of the South".

http://activerain.com/blogsview/1259...and-resilience

Last edited by TexasReb; 07-14-2010 at 09:46 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,711,412 times
Reputation: 15560
You got the "Northern South" areas in Missouri completely wrong on the eastern side of the state.
That part of the state, south of STL, and north of Cape Girardeau, is solidly Midwestern, I grew up there, so I would know.
You also label Poplar Bluff as part of the Ozark south, which is wrong also, its southern all right, but not in that sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2010, 10:31 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,116,144 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
You got the "Northern South" areas in Missouri completely wrong on the eastern side of the state.
That part of the state, south of STL, and north of Cape Girardeau, is solidly Midwestern, I grew up there, so I would know.
You also label Poplar Bluff as part of the Ozark south, which is wrong also, its southern all right, but not in that sense.
The relgion map is a good map to see how close the border of the South is to St. Louis. It tends to follow the line where either Catholics or Baptists are the largest group. The Catholic predominant counties are Midwestern, although there are Southern elements present unlike places further North. It is more in common to places along I-70 which are all very similar to each other in a sense. (or at least different from the Great Lakes)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top