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Old 07-12-2010, 08:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I can see a lot of eastern NC being included in the "deep South" category.
Hmm...where, in your opinion, does the deep south lie in NC? I wouldnt honestly know where the deep south lies in the state, as Im not familiar enough with all of it to make a summary judgement. Although Ive been to the Greensboro, Charlotte, Raleigh triad area and it felt extremely southern, I cant say that it felt like a deep south area, if one considers Alabama, Miss, LA, GA, and south carolina the deep south.
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Old 07-12-2010, 09:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
Hmm...where, in your opinion, does the deep south lie in NC? I wouldnt honestly know where the deep south lies in the state, as Im not familiar enough with all of it to make a summary judgement. Although Ive been to the Greensboro, Charlotte, Raleigh triad area and it felt extremely southern, I cant say that it felt like a deep south area, if one considers Alabama, Miss, LA, GA, and south carolina the deep south.
I figure if there is a Deep South part of North Carolina it is the Eastern end. (Although close to the coast it is more Tidewater in nature which is its own group) It is going to be found East of Charlotte and South of Raleigh. (Those areas are Piedmont and part of a rapidly changing culture)
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Old 07-12-2010, 09:40 AM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,185,893 times
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Default Texas map not accurate

Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
This map is just about ideal imo..except that I would move the pink area over a smidgen to include Huntsville, TX and Houston. (Especially Huntsville). Huntsville could very, very easily be placed in Mississippi without the slightest hint of a difference being detectable between the two.
Sorry, Houston is NOT deep south. LOL at that. It's more similar culturally to Dallas or Austin than to Birmingham AL.
Baytown might be, other parts of the east side may have pockets like that, but overall... no.


Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Here's the latest version of the map.

South boundaries - Google Maps
Once again people, Houston is MODERATE. It is not conservative, except perhaps some of the east side suburb pockets. Fiscally conservative is not the same as socially conservative. You do realize that Houston is the largest city with an openly gay mayor, and is the largest municipal purchaser of "green" electricity? If you really think the dividing line is nearby, I-45 would be more appropriate (right now you have even Montrose and Sugar Land and all of west Houston in the deep south, LOL at that!) It's the largest city in the south and has a very international vibe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston
Houston is a multicultural city, in part because of its many academic institutions and strong industries as well as being a major port city. Over ninety languages are spoken in the city. Houston has among the youngest populations in the nation, partly due to an influx of immigrants into Texas. Houston has a large number of immigrants from Asia, including the largest Vietnamese American population in Texas and third-largest in the United States, with 30,000 people in 2007. Houston has two Chinatowns: the original located in East Downtown, and the more recent one is in the southwest area of the city. The city has a Little Saigon in Midtown and Vietnamese businesses located in the southwest area of Houston's Chinatown. A "Little India" community exists along Hillcroft Avenue.
Houston has a large gay community concentrated primarily in and around Neartown and Houston Heights. With the election of Annise Parker in 2009, Houston became the largest city in the United States to have an openly gay mayor.
The city is home to the nation’s third largest concentration of consular offices, representing 86 countries.
Houston has the third tallest skyline in North America and one of the top 10 in the world.
Houston is the seat of the internationally renowned Texas Medical Center, which contains the world's largest concentration of research and healthcare institutions.
Only New York City is home to more Fortune 500 headquarters in the city limits.
The city has a population from various ethnic and religious backgrounds and a large and growing international community. It is home to many cultural institutions and exhibits—attracting more than 7 million visitors a year to the Houston Museum District. Houston has an active visual and performing arts scene in the Theater District and is one of few U.S. cities that offer year-round resident companies in all major performing arts
.

Does that sound representative of the description of a deep south city?
But, whatever... some stereotypes just never die I guess.

And what's up with the line and circle around Austin, what's that supposed to be be? And don't try to tell me it's not in the south and so dramatically different from the other major Texas metros, it's not...
Take it from someone who has lived around Texas and still does...

Last edited by AK123; 07-12-2010 at 09:57 AM..
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
Sorry, Houston is NOT deep south. LOL at that. It's more similar culturally to Dallas or Austin than to Birmingham AL.
Baytown might be, other parts of the east side may have pockets like that, but overall... no.
Ill agree to disagree. I think pretty much the whole city is in the Deep south...clearly so, even
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:12 AM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,185,893 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
Ill agree to disagree. I think pretty much the whole city is in the Deep south...clearly so, even
Well I've lived in it and disagree entirely, in fact think it's ridiculous... and have given you plenty of evidences as to why it is not. I can come up with more if you'd like. You've given me nothing except saying "I think pretty much..." Do you realize how explosive the growth has been in Houston? These people are moving from the northeast, midwest, west coast, Asian, Latin America. Do you think that has no effect on a city? So, if you'd like to create an inaccurate map, have at it. Just don't try to pass it off as truly representative.

Also interesting that you at first didn't have Houston in the deep south category, but changed it later, inaccurately. So obviously you haven't "thought" that the whole time.
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
Well I've lived in it and disagree entirely, in fact think it's ridiculous... and have given you plenty of evidences as to why it is not. I can come up with more if you'd like. You've given me nothing except saying "I think pretty much..." Do you realize how explosive the growth has been in Houston? These people are moving from the northeast, midwest, west coast, Asian, Latin America. Do you think that has no effect on a city? So, if you'd like to create an inaccurate map, have at it. Just don't try to pass it off as truly representative.

Also interesting that you at first didn't have Houston in the deep south category, but changed it later, inaccurately. So obviously you haven't "thought" that the whole time.
???...Ive always maintained that Houston has been in the deep south...are you sure that you're not confusing me with someone else? Ive never even created a map, much less tried to proclaim myself as an authoritarian on all matters of geography.

Anywho...Ive lived in it too, and its solidly a deep south city as far as Im concerned. I dont consider an arbitrary statement about it being similar to Austin or Dallas as evidentiary of anything other than your opinion, which you and I are obviously entitled to respectively.
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:26 AM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,185,893 times
Reputation: 3642
Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
???...Ive always maintained that Houston has been in the deep south...are you sure that you're not confusing me with someone else? Ive never even created a map, much less tried to proclaim myself as an authoritarian on all matters of geography.

Anywho...Ive lived in it too, and its solidly a deep south city as far as Im concerned. I dont consider an arbitrary statement about it being similar to Austin or Dallas as evidentiary of anything other than your opinion, which you and I are obviously entitled to respectively.
Yes, I confused you with the creator of the map.
Apparently he did not have Houston in the deep south category at first. Then you suggested it should be and he changed it. Too bad.
I don't care if you "maintain" that it is, when you have no evidence to back that up. At least by the definition given by his map... read the definitions on his map:
"High Black population" -- Houston has the same percentage Black population as Dallas, but a slightly higher Asian population. Significantly lower than places like Atlanta, D.C., Chicago, and many other smaller cities in the "deep south."
"High poverty" -- San Antonio has higher poverty.
"Very conservative politics" -- Nope. Democratic (and gay) mayor. Houston (city) usually goes blue in recent national elections.

Last edited by AK123; 07-12-2010 at 10:43 AM..
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Old 07-12-2010, 11:21 AM
 
3,424 posts, read 5,234,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AK123 View Post
Yes, I confused you with the creator of the map.
Apparently he did not have Houston in the deep south category at first. Then you suggested it should be and he changed it. Too bad.
I don't care if you "maintain" that it is, when you have no evidence to back that up. At least by the definition given by his map... read the definitions on his map:
"High Black population" -- Houston has the same percentage Black population as Dallas, but a slightly higher Asian population. Significantly lower than places like Atlanta, D.C., Chicago, and many other smaller cities in the "deep south."
"High poverty" -- San Antonio has higher poverty.
"Very conservative politics" -- Nope. Democratic (and gay) mayor. Houston (city) usually goes blue in recent national elections.
You havent really provided any factual evidence that would exclude Houston from the deep south...You've predictably cherry picked a few criteria that marginally distinguish it from the stereotypically rural deep south.

In terms of sheer numerics Houston actually has the largest black population in the south. Percentage wise, its black population cannot really be given an apples to apples comparison given its recently burgeoned latino, African, and international populations.

The fact that san antonio has higher poverty than Houston doesnt mean much considering its a smaller metro. smaller, less industrious places will almost always have more poverty than the typical large metro.

Politically, houston is socially liberal but fiscally conservative. so its politics are essentially a nonsequitor. It is a business friendly city.

Like I said, Ill agree to disagree...but I maintain that Houston is a Deep south city. If you dont believe it is, so be it - "too bad"...
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Old 07-12-2010, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,712,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
???...Ive always maintained that Houston has been in the deep south...are you sure that you're not confusing me with someone else? Ive never even created a map, much less tried to proclaim myself as an authoritarian on all matters of geography.

Anywho...Ive lived in it too, and its solidly a deep south city as far as Im concerned. I dont consider an arbitrary statement about it being similar to Austin or Dallas as evidentiary of anything other than your opinion, which you and I are obviously entitled to respectively.
If Houston is deep south; than NC is DEFINITELY deep south.

The south is very different though and it's really hard to label what is deep south because even the states considered deep south are different. Louisiana and Mississippi have more in common with East/Central Texas than Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.
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Old 07-12-2010, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,712,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solytaire View Post
You havent really provided any factual evidence that would exclude Houston from the deep south...You've predictably cherry picked a few criteria that marginally distinguish it from the stereotypically rural deep south.

In terms of sheer numerics Houston actually has the largest black population in the south. Percentage wise, its black population cannot really be given an apples to apples comparison given its recently burgeoned latino, African, and international populations.

The fact that san antonio has higher poverty than Houston doesnt mean much considering its a smaller metro. smaller, less industrious places will almost always have more poverty than the typical large metro.

Politically, houston is socially liberal but fiscally conservative. so its politics are essentially a nonsequitor. It is a business friendly city.

Like I said, Ill agree to disagree...but I maintain that Houston is a Deep south city. If you dont believe it is, so be it - "too bad"...
Houston isn't deep south. I've been to Charlotte and it felt much more stereotypical southern than Houston.Houston is one the few cities in the country that has influences from two different regions (Texas Triangle and Gulf Coast). Your not going to find many cities in the Deep south that have such a strong creole/cajun influence and as well as a relatively large black catholic population.
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