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Old 07-13-2010, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,232,570 times
Reputation: 1802

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rah View Post
^When did anyone say Oakland was a suburb?

As far as Berkeley, it's not one of the three main cities of the Bay Area, so what is it exactly if not a suburb? Like i said, it's not "suburbia", as it's a very dense and bustling place which could easily pass as part of SF or Oakland (hell, it basically IS a part of Oakland)...but it is an inner suburb. I don't really see what else you could classify it as.
I see your point; that same thing could be applied to cities like Santa Monica and Pasadena. Certainly not suburbia but adjacent to Los Angeles.
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Old 07-13-2010, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,642 posts, read 7,442,969 times
Reputation: 4315
Glad we sent Austin back where it needed to go and out of the West...

BTW, who wrote this crap? The Southwest (at least AZ), is not majority Hispanic. The 'very conservative politics' statement is misleading as Arizona is very much a fiscally conservative state (part of the impetus for the SB1070 Bill - money spent on illegals), yet not a socially conservative one, and almost became a blue state last election had McCain not been from AZ. The statement 'high racial tensions between Whites and Hispanics' is outrageous and unwarranted, but wouldn't surprise me as anybody can take something from the left-leaning media and twist it to make any other idiot believe it. I won't even comment on the "major cities" section.
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Old 07-14-2010, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,232,570 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
Glad we sent Austin back where it needed to go and out of the West...

BTW, who wrote this crap? The Southwest (at least AZ), is not majority Hispanic. The 'very conservative politics' statement is misleading as Arizona is very much a fiscally conservative state (part of the impetus for the SB1070 Bill - money spent on illegals), yet not a socially conservative one, and almost became a blue state last election had McCain not been from AZ. The statement 'high racial tensions between Whites and Hispanics' is outrageous and unwarranted, but wouldn't surprise me as anybody can take something from the left-leaning media and twist it to make any other idiot believe it. I won't even comment on the "major cities" section.
I agree the cultural information is badly flawed and taints the entire discussion. It appears that whoever wrote the cultural descriptions had no clue about certain things and it becomes almost ridiculous. The topic is an interesting one, however and I hope someone can produce a better description.
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Old 07-14-2010, 08:27 AM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,115,798 times
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Well which party is dominant isn't always an idicator of weather an area is liberal or conservative. There are a number of groups that vote for democrats but can be rather socially conservative.

Also in terms of the West, aren't there many places that are not liberal or conservative in terms of social issues. More along the lines of they don't really care one way or the other? I figure most of the West is that way except Utah and the Pacific Coast.
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Old 07-14-2010, 03:04 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,605,870 times
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A few comments about the map:

-Why is a chunk of the Central Sierras of California including Mammoth Lakes, Yosemite, and some foothills towns at the edge of the Central Valley included in the Mormon Corridor? I spent a lot of time in this region and while there are Mormons throughout California I've never noticed a higher concentration of LDS in the area.

-Sedona and Santa Fe might be fairly upscale these days, but they are still tied into the desert Southwest--and the images of both towns have come to represent a stereotypical view of the Southwest in the popular mindset (the famous Red Rocks of Sedona and the adobe architecture prevalent in Santa Fe, while existent in other locales in the region are trademarks of both towns) . And Phoenix has an influence on Sedona as Albuquerque and Santa Fe have a connection. It seems the Mountain West region on this map is particularly disjointed---they aren't more connected to Denver than their own states.

-Is San Diego really unique enough to warrant its own region? I've always found it similar to much of the rest of Southern California including much of neighboring Orange County. And for the Left Coast, the northern coast of California including Eureka/Arcata is much more similar to the greater Pacific NW than to the Inland Empire and San Bernardino.
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Old 07-14-2010, 08:49 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,451,261 times
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its amazing how every thread about the West turns into a debate about LA or San Fran, or the other 2 Pacific coast cities.
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Old 07-14-2010, 10:50 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,115,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
A few comments about the map:

-Why is a chunk of the Central Sierras of California including Mammoth Lakes, Yosemite, and some foothills towns at the edge of the Central Valley included in the Mormon Corridor? I spent a lot of time in this region and while there are Mormons throughout California I've never noticed a higher concentration of LDS in the area.

-Sedona and Santa Fe might be fairly upscale these days, but they are still tied into the desert Southwest--and the images of both towns have come to represent a stereotypical view of the Southwest in the popular mindset (the famous Red Rocks of Sedona and the adobe architecture prevalent in Santa Fe, while existent in other locales in the region are trademarks of both towns) . And Phoenix has an influence on Sedona as Albuquerque and Santa Fe have a connection. It seems the Mountain West region on this map is particularly disjointed---they aren't more connected to Denver than their own states.

-Is San Diego really unique enough to warrant its own region? I've always found it similar to much of the rest of Southern California including much of neighboring Orange County. And for the Left Coast, the northern coast of California including Eureka/Arcata is much more similar to the greater Pacific NW than to the Inland Empire and San Bernardino.
Well San Diego is different enough from LA to be a seperate region. (I would include Orange county as part of that region as well. The only part of the entire Pacific coast line I might have difficultry with is the area between LA and SF, what does the area more resemble?
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Old 07-14-2010, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 8,232,570 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
Well San Diego is different enough from LA to be a seperate region. (I would include Orange county as part of that region as well. The only part of the entire Pacific coast line I might have difficultry with is the area between LA and SF, what does the area more resemble?
All the coastal counties from LA to San Francisco and well beyond to about the Oregon border are Left Coast since they all vote Democratic and the Green party is very strong in counties like Santa Cruz\ San Francisco\ Sonoma\ Mendocino\ Humboldt.
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Old 07-15-2010, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
636 posts, read 1,339,309 times
Reputation: 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
A few comments about the map:
-Is San Diego really unique enough to warrant its own region? I've always found it similar to much of the rest of Southern California including much of neighboring Orange County. And for the Left Coast, the northern coast of California includingEureka/Arcata is much more similar to the greater Pacific NW than to the Inland Empire and San Bernardino.
Actually it is. However I believe that Orange County should be joined in with San Diego since I feel the two are more similar then L.A.-OC.

I would most definitely agree!
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Old 07-15-2010, 01:07 AM
 
871 posts, read 1,956,535 times
Reputation: 596
Quote:
Originally Posted by rah View Post
^When did anyone say Oakland was a suburb?

As far as Berkeley, it's not one of the three main cities of the Bay Area, so what is it exactly if not a suburb? Like i said, it's not "suburbia", as it's a very dense and bustling place which could easily pass as part of SF or Oakland (hell, it basically IS a part of Oakland)...but it is an inner suburb. I don't really see what else you could classify it as.
what is it? its a small city. maybe not a huge city, but berkeley is a city. i cant think of any context in which someone could call berkeley suburban. the east bay is a solid urban area and city limits are basically meaningless.

do you consider richmond to be a suburb? why dont you head on up to richmond and enjoy some "suburban" life. go at night. everything on the east bay was a suburb at some point (including all the small suburbs that converged to become oakland) but none of that is suburbs now. the suburbs of the bay area are more places like fremont or danville.

there is no way an area as urban as berkeley could ever be considered a suburb. berkeley is a city. and when a region is called "left coast" it sure makes sense to call berkeley a major city as its the "deep left coast" the way mississippi is the "deep south". a place like telegraph avenue is a perfect example of this.
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