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Old 07-11-2010, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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Like my Midwest and South threads, this is a map that shows the cultural regions of the Western U.S.

West boundaries - Google Maps
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Old 07-11-2010, 08:36 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Greeley is a major city in the mountain west? Cheyenne? Cheyenne may count as the largest city in WY but it only has ~ 53,000 people. Greeley doesn't even have 100,000. Colorado Springs has ~400K with a metro of 600K; Boise has ~200K with a metro of ~500K.

I'll have to think about the rest.
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Old 07-11-2010, 08:48 PM
 
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The only tweaks I could see so far is put Idaho Falls in the Mormon Corridor, The Four Corners area in the Mountain West, and Boulder, CO in the Left Coast (Especially if you put Austin in there)
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Old 07-11-2010, 11:02 PM
 
Location: 602/520
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Seeing as Cheyenne is a state capital, I would consider it a major city in the corridor. My questions are what do you call the parts of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado that are not shaded in any cultural hearth? Those areas are certainly not Midwestern. They would be classifed as the Great Plains, but to me the Great Plains are an integral part of the West. Just because there are no snow-capped mountains doesn't exclude them from the region.

Also, how is Austin in the same category as LA and a liberal bastion like Boulder is considered the Mountain West? Austin is still in Texas no matter how liberal it may seem.

Lastly, just because the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas doesn't fit easily into a cultural hearth doesn't make it Western. It has an extremely high Mexican population, but it is also in a climate zone that is not similar at ALL to any other area in the West (Humidity, hurricanes, and frequent precipitation). The landscape also resembles Florida more than it does New Mexico or even California.
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Old 07-11-2010, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,571,893 times
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Great Plains = Midwest. I made a similar map for the Midwest and included those areas.

Austin is often grouped with cities like San Francisco and Portland. It's one of the most un-Texan cities in Texas. It has little in common with the rest of the state. Boulder is a suburb of Denver.
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Old 07-12-2010, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Pasadena
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Quote:
Left Coast
Last Updated by Jeremy 3 hours ago
The California coast and Austin, Texas. Very liberal politics. Environmentally-focused area. High population density. Very diverse, with Whites, Hispanics and Asians predominate. Major cities include Austin, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Berkeley, San Jose, Oakland and Petaluma.
Who wrote this silly description? Petaluma as a major city? Since when is Austin Texas considered Left Coast? It may be liberal but it is 1000 miles away from the West Coast and even culturally speaking Texas is quite different from California. This is weird!
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Old 07-12-2010, 01:31 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,180,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
Who wrote this silly description? Petaluma as a major city? Since when is Austin Texas considered Left Coast? It may be liberal but it is 1000 miles away from the West Coast and even culturally speaking Texas is quite different from California. This is weird!
apart from it being 1000 miles from the west coast it is not as diverse as cities its size in California. It is mainly white latin and very small percentages of other groups. If you are going to make another map I would leave Austin in with the same areas as Dallas, fort worth, San Antonio, Corpus Cristi. Basically the group east of west Texas and west of the chunk you already took out for the deep south.

also New Mexico is not really really conservative as you put it. they go back and forth. Obama won it by 15 points, Bush won it by a few points
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Old 07-12-2010, 08:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
also New Mexico is not really really conservative as you put it. they go back and forth. Obama won it by 15 points, Bush won it by a few points
Have to consider that in cases with minorities, they may vote predominantly for Democrats but are often socially conservative. I think social vales are what is being described rather than party voting.

Also Boulder isn't really a Denver suburb. It has its own seperate identity and history from Denver. It is no more than a sattelite city of Denver but not seen as a typical suburb.
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Old 07-12-2010, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
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Good job.
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Old 07-12-2010, 10:19 AM
 
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I like it except don't put Austin with California. It is clearly a Texan city and belongs in the Western South with Dallas and San Antonio. You could take out every city in the country from it's actual region cause it is culturally different from the rural areas around it but you shouldn't because it is still an integral part of that region. Plus Austin is not as un-Texan as you make it out to seem.
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