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Old 08-14-2017, 09:17 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,738 posts, read 9,030,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyp1 View Post
More accurately instead of "geographical boundaries" is what ethnicity 'settled' the state (as once explained to me). IE, in Utah the Mormons; Colorado: gold seekers from the East who found NONE and how Denver grew; Arizona: mostly snowbirds seeking a 'piece of the sun'---I call it Florida West---same population; New Mexico: mostly the pueblo Indians and Spanierds and more recently the federal govt poluting the state because they believed the land in the state to be worthless. Oh and don't forget the American Indians who in most of those states were here first but the Indian wars took care of them except for Custer!
In the Great Plains states do you see much difference between who settled them if you are east or west of the 100th meridian?
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,735,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyp1 View Post
"Mutual respect" LOL...Don't know if much of that exists anymore in this narcissistic country and WITH a narcissistic POTUS? Anyway IA vs NE? IA is more akin to Minnesota (my native state) and thus more progressive. They're LGBT friendly. Nebraska however, and I just moved from the panhandle (Scottsbluff) is very Red state especially in the panhandle where 30% (retired) are just waiting to die! Omaha and Lincoln probably have a few progressives BUT they just reenacted their death penalty law in a vote of the people which I voted against. All you get in NE (maybe IA too) is a lot of flies, spiders, and these very small moths. No thanks.
Iowa doesn't seem too progressive from the perspective of my wildly liberal home state. Bear in mind that perspective is a heck of a drug.

Sadly, you're right about the lack of respect in this country for other parts of this country. I feel like it is more divided than it has been since the civil war.
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Old 08-15-2017, 02:57 AM
 
Location: Pueblo CO
214 posts, read 187,365 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
In the Great Plains states do you see much difference between who settled them if you are east or west of the 100th meridian?
Well assuming the "100th meridian" goes N & South of where you mentioned I can only say I grew up in the cities (MSP). St Paul is Irish/German and Minneapolis is mostly Swede...but now that has all changed with 16% Black and growing along with the cop shootings and crime rate. Cities do not remain stagnant.
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Old 08-15-2017, 03:07 AM
 
Location: Pueblo CO
214 posts, read 187,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
I've always thought Iowa was more like Nebraska. They may be progressive, however, the state is also very insulated. With a lot of the people I know there is very little desire to leave the state boundaries. What's even more strange is how often people there say the name of their state. I swear it's inserted into every third sentence. That's why I think a lot of that prejudice is out of ignorance.
Well I can tell you coming from Minnesota the same goes on. They also mention their "state name" much. I believe the operative word is 'provincial' as exists in many states (lived in about 12). Or some kind of utopia-like existence. Minnesotans like to travel (as demonstrated by their large airport in MSP) but "home is where their heart is" even in view of all the cop-shootings and crime now there. Garrison Keillor in a PBS documentary on MN years ago is famed to say: "If you come to Minnesota the first time you'll find that it is just to good." LOL...not any more.

Last edited by tommyp1; 08-15-2017 at 03:09 AM.. Reason: word change
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Old 08-15-2017, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,164 posts, read 1,443,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
I've seen pictures of it and it looks very pretty. Especially with all of the cranes around. Truthfully I find it very ignorant that these particular people say this about Nebraska, considering their idea of a vacation is Going to the Iowa State Fair and they almost never set foot outside of their state.
The hypocrisy in this post is so thick, it can be cut with a knife.

Truth be told, the ignorance can go both ways. Many Nebraskans have little idea of what Iowa is like outside of Council Bluffs (a blue-collar suburb of Omaha), and assume the rest of the state is just like it.
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Old 08-15-2017, 07:04 AM
 
4,922 posts, read 1,835,895 times
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According to that old famous issue of the New Yorker, the other side of the Hudson River.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,317,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyp1 View Post
Well I can tell you coming from Minnesota the same goes on. They also mention their "state name" much. I believe the operative word is 'provincial' as exists in many states (lived in about 12). Or some kind of utopia-like existence. Minnesotans like to travel (as demonstrated by their large airport in MSP) but "home is where their heart is" even in view of all the cop-shootings and crime now there. Garrison Keillor in a PBS documentary on MN years ago is famed to say: "If you come to Minnesota the first time you'll find that it is just to good." LOL...not any more.
Should I point to Columbine, Aurora and DIA as reasons to throw Denver in that same spotlight? Can't speak for Pueblo, but then again, who can?
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:59 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,136 posts, read 9,907,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MMS02760 View Post
According to that old famous issue of the New Yorker, the other side of the Hudson River.
Yeah, on the other side of the Hudson River there is a town called West New York LOL.
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Old 08-15-2017, 11:09 AM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,541,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MMS02760 View Post
According to that old famous issue of the New Yorker, the other side of the Hudson River.
That's crazy, everyone knows it's the Connecticut River, it's called the pioneer valley for a reason.
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Old 08-15-2017, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,561 posts, read 10,270,983 times
Reputation: 9802
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
About 100 degrees West. AKA, anywhere it doesn't get reliably humid.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
I verified this kind of by accident on a trip through Nebraska once. We left Grand Island, Nebraska, about mid-morning on a summer day. Very green, no hills or mountains in sight, thicker air. I took one last look at the surroundings, went to sleep in the car, and had my wife drive us back towards Denver.

I woke up somewhere west of North Platte. By comparison, things looked dead. It looked like a barren wasteland with comparatively dead looking trees/landscape. It was almost unsightly compared to what we had seen all morning.

Another one. Drive west from Salina, KS to Hays, KS during the summer. Salina will be green, humid, kinda gross feeling. Get to Hays about 90 miles west (which is at 99W actually), and it feels like you've instantly been transported from a steamroom to a sauna, and the landscape becomes treeless!

Given your example, places like Bismarck and Pierre are right in the transition zone. One could make a simple argument that Williston and Rapid City are definitely "West", while Fargo and Sioux Falls probably couldn't be considered "West" by most definitions.
This. In Texas, the West doesn't begin in earnest til you get to the eastern edge of the Llano Estacado. That's 20-30 miles west of US-183. US-281 is even further east than 183. Grand Island and Wichita Falls are not western (nor is Fort Worth).
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