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Old 08-16-2017, 01:38 PM
 
Location: DFW
6,800 posts, read 11,786,692 times
Reputation: 5154

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
US 83 is a better divider.

In Texas, that goes through Childress, Abilene, Junction, Uvalde and Laredo
I definitely think there's a "buffer" zone and i-35 is where it begins. The first major city in the buffer is Fort Worth. Other cities that lies in the buffer which contain both Western and Southern characteristics include: Abilene, San Antonio, Austin, Lubbock, Big Spring, Midland.

Imo, Odessa is the first "Western" city in Texas outside of the buffer. Other cities west of the buffer include Marfa, Alpine, El Paso, Monahans, etc.

Then again, if the CA - > TX migration continues (which I've taken part of), the entire state could become culturally Western.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,893,625 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
I definitely think there's a "buffer" zone and i-35 is where it begins. The first major city in the buffer is Fort Worth. Other cities that lies in the buffer which contain both Western and Southern characteristics include: Abilene, San Antonio, Austin, Lubbock, Big Spring, Midland.

Imo, Odessa is the first "Western" city in Texas outside of the buffer. Other cities west of the buffer include Marfa, Alpine, El Paso, Monahans, etc.

Then again, if the CA - > TX migration continues (which I've taken part of), the entire state could become culturally Western.
I've been to San Antonio, and don't really consider it western, they still get over 30" of rain a year and are very humid, same for Austin and Ft Worth.

I honestly don't feel the west has started until I hit Junction on I-10, Abilene on I-20 and Shamrock on I-40
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Old 08-17-2017, 04:51 AM
 
Location: Pueblo CO
214 posts, read 188,022 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I've been to San Antonio, and don't really consider it western, they still get over 30" of rain a year and are very humid, same for Austin and Ft Worth.

I honestly don't feel the west has started until I hit Junction on I-10, Abilene on I-20 and Shamrock on I-40
Great post. Key 2 words: "very humid" If people in this thread haven't experienced the difference between humid and semi-arid air...they haven't traveled or lived long enough in this country of 4000+mi from East to West. For me it was all explained on a "Wayfarer" marker (looks like a historical marker off road) that exists on the state fair grounds in Huron SD with the title: "Here the West begins." Google it. Humid air is thicker....Semi-arid air is thinner and dryer. The more you age, semi-arid air becomes more attractive and pleasing to the human body IMO. As once explained to me: "The West is composed of mountains, deserts, and valleys." Thanks.

Last edited by tommyp1; 08-17-2017 at 04:53 AM.. Reason: grammar
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Old 08-17-2017, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,569 posts, read 3,716,373 times
Reputation: 4156
At the risk of repeating myself, the west begins wherever you want it to.

The definitions can change based on your point of view. Someone on the East Coast can call the "The West" anything outside the eastern time zone. (But they would be wrong).

Historically, this country was built on an 18th and 19th century outlook. The west was originally considered anything outside the 13 colonies. Unfortunately, this attitude is somewhat still alive today.

But by the 19th century the west had a new definition, thanks in part to Lewis & Clark, and the advancement of railroads and westward expansion in general.

Today, the west is clear cut as we can see the entire country, unlike the pioneers that didn't have much vision of such.

In 2017, the west is generally classified as those areas west of the a line that stretches along the eastern borders of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico. (Perhaps a nod to West Texas).

But back to my original point. It still is a matter of what you want it to be.
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Old 08-17-2017, 08:45 PM
 
Location: IN
20,857 posts, read 35,987,118 times
Reputation: 13304
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
At the risk of repeating myself, the west begins wherever you want it to.

The definitions can change based on your point of view. Someone on the East Coast can call the "The West" anything outside the eastern time zone. (But they would be wrong).

Historically, this country was built on an 18th and 19th century outlook. The west was originally considered anything outside the 13 colonies. Unfortunately, this attitude is somewhat still alive today.

But by the 19th century the west had a new definition, thanks in part to Lewis & Clark, and the advancement of railroads and westward expansion in general.

Today, the west is clear cut as we can see the entire country, unlike the pioneers that didn't have much vision of such.

In 2017, the west is generally classified as those areas west of the a line that stretches along the eastern borders of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico. (Perhaps a nod to West Texas).

But back to my original point. It still is a matter of what you want it to be.
Yes, generally agreed, but the West does include the western portions of the Great Plains states of West River (Dakotas), western Nebraska, western Kansas, western Oklahoma, and west Texas. As discussed, that transition is around the 100th meridian, or along and west of hwy 83, 281, or 183.
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Old 08-17-2017, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,569 posts, read 3,716,373 times
Reputation: 4156
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Yes, generally agreed, but the West does include the western portions of the Great Plains states of West River (Dakotas), western Nebraska, western Kansas, western Oklahoma, and west Texas. As discussed, that transition is around the 100th meridian, or along and west of hwy 83, 281, or 183.
Agreed, that is why I used the term "generally". But you are correct, Western ND, SD, NB, OK and as I mentioned TX, all feel more western.

As someone else mentioned, Dallas, TX is eastern, but Ft. Worth is western. An interesting divide that still seems to exist today.
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Old 08-18-2017, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles-Houston-DFW
1,689 posts, read 844,504 times
Reputation: 1783
When I drove from Houston to LA, it started feeling western once I got close to Kerrville, Texas. A noticeable shift in vegetation and landscape. Cities and businesses were also spaced out a lot farther from each other, speed limit went up to 80, and cell phone reception was lost not too long after (thanks Sprint!).

If you've never done the drive through Texas on I-10, its pretty interesting how the state changes from Houston to San Antonio to El Paso.
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Old 08-18-2017, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,569 posts, read 3,716,373 times
Reputation: 4156
Indeed, Texas is so big that you can experience big changes from east to west. The Houston area is so totally different than West Texas. West Texas is perhaps more similar to New Mexico or even Colorado.
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Old 08-18-2017, 10:12 AM
 
101 posts, read 54,305 times
Reputation: 80
100th meridian.
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Old 08-18-2017, 04:41 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,746 posts, read 9,050,206 times
Reputation: 11158
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
At the risk of repeating myself, the west begins wherever you want it to.

The definitions can change based on your point of view. Someone on the East Coast can call the "The West" anything outside the eastern time zone. (But they would be wrong).

Historically, this country was built on an 18th and 19th century outlook. The west was originally considered anything outside the 13 colonies. Unfortunately, this attitude is somewhat still alive today.

But by the 19th century the west had a new definition, thanks in part to Lewis & Clark, and the advancement of railroads and westward expansion in general.

Today, the west is clear cut as we can see the entire country, unlike the pioneers that didn't have much vision of such.

In 2017, the west is generally classified as those areas west of the a line that stretches along the eastern borders of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico. (Perhaps a nod to West Texas).

But back to my original point. It still is a matter of what you want it to be.
I think this discussion and thread proves this. Look at all the talk about Texas.
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