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Old 08-19-2017, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dixiedean1878 View Post
100th meridian.
In at least Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas the physical changes to more western terrain and weather are a good 100 or so miles east of the 100th meridian. Don't know about the Dakotas but the 100th meridian as a demarcation puts a whole lot of the great plains in the eastern part of the country.
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Old 08-19-2017, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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The west begins when the radio stations start with a "K" instead of a "W."
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Old 08-19-2017, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
The west begins when the radio stations start with a "K" instead of a "W."
Using that as your gauge is just a bit flawed. Dallas (WRR) would be eastern, and Pittsburgh (KDKA) would be western. They're both eastern (and contrary to prior assertions Fort Worth isn't western, either).
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Old 08-19-2017, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
The west begins when the radio stations start with a "K" instead of a "W."
That is a good answer in general, but not very good specifically. The line between "K" radio stations and "W" radio stations is generally the Mississippi River.

However, there are plenty of "W" calls west of the Mississippi, and a few "K"'s east.

WDAY Fargo, WCCO Minneapolis, WBAP Fort Worth, WOAI San Antonio, WOI Des Moines, WKY Oklahoma City are all examples of the former.

KDKA Pittsburgh, KQV Pittsburgh, and KYW Philadelphia examples of the latter.

But even ignoring these, "K" call letters are common west of the Mississippi, so that would equate to Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana being in the west. Perhaps this was considered a standard back in the early days of radio in the 1920's, but certainly not today.

Last edited by pnwguy2; 08-19-2017 at 09:35 PM..
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Old 08-19-2017, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
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When traveling East to West on I-20 in Texas, the scenery begins to look more dry as you get west of Fort Worth. More exposed soil, cactus, scrub brush. Especially after you cross over the Brazos River.
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Old 08-19-2017, 09:28 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
In at least Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas the physical changes to more western terrain and weather are a good 100 or so miles east of the 100th meridian. Don't know about the Dakotas but the 100th meridian as a demarcation puts a whole lot of the great plains in the eastern part of the country.
I'm not familiar with Texas, Oklahoma, or Kansas, but in the Dakotas and Nebraska the majority of the land areas of those states do have a Midwestern landscape. Nebraska and eastern South Dakota east of the 100th meridian look identical to Iowa for example, and are culturally more like that. Eastern North Dakota looks a little different in that there are much fewer cornfields but still a similar look. And culturally, most of North Dakota is much more similar to Minnesota than Montana. In those states at least, the 100th meridian is accurate.
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Old 08-19-2017, 10:10 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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I believe you can even throw Western Iowa into the blur zone, driving to Omaha i notice a striking difference in scenery much like crossing through South Dakota.... Western Iowa on I-80 you start getting some rolling hills and its way more open.
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Old 08-19-2017, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,733,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
In at least Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas the physical changes to more western terrain and weather are a good 100 or so miles east of the 100th meridian. Don't know about the Dakotas but the 100th meridian as a demarcation puts a whole lot of the great plains in the eastern part of the country.
I always considered the great plains midwestern, personally.
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Old 08-19-2017, 10:24 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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The 100th meridian is the eastern border of the Texas Panhandle. Driving west on I-40 you pretty much are aware of a change in topography and vegetation at that point. The land starts to break up with more ravines and the Llano Estacado as well as Palo Duro Canyon are not eastern features. Taking that line northward you hit Dodge City in Kansas...not eastern. In Nebraska you have the Sandhills slightly west and going north you hit the Rosebud Reservation and then Bismarck, ND. The Black Hills of South Dakota serve as a definite western landmark (103 degrees west) and the Badlands National Park is at 102 degrees west. East of that line there are a few western-ish places but the 100th meridian is a pretty solid boundary.
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Old 08-20-2017, 07:21 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,728 posts, read 9,024,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I believe you can even throw Western Iowa into the blur zone, driving to Omaha i notice a striking difference in scenery much like crossing through South Dakota.... Western Iowa on I-80 you start getting some rolling hills and its way more open.
I've driven from Council Bluffs to Davenport and I always thought it all looked pretty much the same and that the eastern two thirds of Nebraska did as well. I guess I'll have to pay more attention if I ever drive it again.
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