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Old 08-20-2017, 10:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I always considered the great plains midwestern, personally.
Well, it is what the word was invented to describe...
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Old 08-20-2017, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
The 100th meridian is the eastern border of the Texas Panhandle. Driving west on I-40 you pretty much are aware of a change in topography and vegetation at that point. The land starts to break up with more ravines and the Llano Estacado as well as Palo Duro Canyon are not eastern features. Taking that line northward you hit Dodge City in Kansas...not eastern. In Nebraska you have the Sandhills slightly west and going north you hit the Rosebud Reservation and then Bismarck, ND. The Black Hills of South Dakota serve as a definite western landmark (103 degrees west) and the Badlands National Park is at 102 degrees west. East of that line there are a few western-ish places but the 100th meridian is a pretty solid boundary.
I'm on I 40 in that area virtually every day of my life. Again, I'd say that on I-40 the change is significant once you drop down and cross the Canadian River. West of the Canadian River the land is drier and more wide open but for the most part it is rolling terrain. It gets progressively drier and more treeless but that rolling terrain lasts for 30 or so miles in the Texas panhandle. Once you pass the town of McLean the canyons begin followed by Palo Duro and the Caprock which are surely western. As far as Dodge City is concerned, the part of Kansas that looks like Dodge continues east of Dodge City for quite a ways. Not all the way to Wichita but at least halfway.

Quote:
I'm not familiar with Texas, Oklahoma, or Kansas, but in the Dakotas and Nebraska the majority of the land areas of those states do have a Midwestern landscape. Nebraska and eastern South Dakota east of the 100th meridian look identical to Iowa for example, and are culturally more like that. Eastern North Dakota looks a little different in that there are much fewer cornfields but still a similar look. And culturally, most of North Dakota is much more similar to Minnesota than Montana. In those states at least, the 100th meridian is accurate.
This is interesting. I haven't really heard anyone address North Dakota but I've read a lot about South Dakota and people say west of the Missouri River is distinctly different than east of the Missouri. They consider west of the Missouri as much more "western."\

IMO the 100th meridian is maybe a nice general line but if you want a more nuanced line you need to move the demarcation east somewhat.
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Old 08-20-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,054,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
This is interesting. I haven't really heard anyone address North Dakota but I've read a lot about South Dakota and people say west of the Missouri River is distinctly different than east of the Missouri. They consider west of the Missouri as much more "western."\
I think part of it is that the demarcation in South Dakota is very apparent along I-90.

This is a few miles east of the Missouri:

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.7560...7i13312!8i6656

This is a few miles west:

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.8231...7i13312!8i6656

Those are only a few miles apart on opposite sides of Chamberlain, South Dakota.
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Old 08-20-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,416,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I believe you can even throw Western Iowa into the blur zone, driving to Omaha i notice a striking difference in scenery much like crossing through South Dakota.... Western Iowa on I-80 you start getting some rolling hills and its way more open.
That's just these: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loess_Hills
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Old 08-20-2017, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
IMO the 100th meridian is maybe a nice general line but if you want a more nuanced line you need to move the demarcation east somewhat.
A nuanced line would actually be all squiggly and jagged. That's part of why when it comes to a hard line, the 100th is the best.
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Old 08-20-2017, 05:22 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,728 posts, read 9,024,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
I'm on I 40 in that area virtually every day of my life. Again, I'd say that on I-40 the change is significant once you drop down and cross the Canadian River. West of the Canadian River the land is drier and more wide open but for the most part it is rolling terrain. It gets progressively drier and more treeless but that rolling terrain lasts for 30 or so miles in the Texas panhandle. Once you pass the town of McLean the canyons begin followed by Palo Duro and the Caprock which are surely western. As far as Dodge City is concerned, the part of Kansas that looks like Dodge continues east of Dodge City for quite a ways. Not all the way to Wichita but at least halfway.



This is interesting. I haven't really heard anyone address North Dakota but I've read a lot about South Dakota and people say west of the Missouri River is distinctly different than east of the Missouri. They consider west of the Missouri as much more "western."\

IMO the 100th meridian is maybe a nice general line but if you want a more nuanced line you need to move the demarcation east somewhat.
You don't hear about North Dakota because not many drive across it. It's the least visited state in the nation. South Dakota, on the other hand has some notable tourist attractions. Anyone road tripping there is going to notice that change on the Missouri River, especially if it's their first time out west. It's probably going to make quite the impression.
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Old 08-21-2017, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,546 posts, read 3,690,388 times
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The west begins in the mountain time zone for lack of a better definition.

But there are true barometers of where it begins...and mostly due to topography,

North Dakota presents the west around Dickinson, as you soon enter the Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

South Dakota presents the west at the Missouri, but more pronounced at Kadoka.

Both states are transitional into the west, (North Dakota into Montana), (South Dakota into Wyoming).
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Old 08-22-2017, 08:56 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
The west begins in the mountain time zone for lack of a better definition.

But there are true barometers of where it begins...and mostly due to topography,

North Dakota presents the west around Dickinson, as you soon enter the Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

South Dakota presents the west at the Missouri, but more pronounced at Kadoka.

Both states are transitional into the west, (North Dakota into Montana), (South Dakota into Wyoming).
I would say North Dakota gets a bit more western looking at Mandan, but I do agree it's more pronounced around Dickinson. The Mountain Time Zone isn't too far away then.
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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The mountain time zone is indeed right in this area and slices through North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and even Texas. Our early planners perhaps got it right.
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Old 08-24-2017, 07:21 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
The mountain time zone is indeed right in this area and slices through North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and even Texas. Our early planners perhaps got it right.
I always thought it was weird that all those states had two time zones. The "western" region of South Dakota I think does somewhat line up with the Mountain Time Zone, but that's not the case in North Dakota.
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