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Old 09-09-2017, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Pueblo CO
214 posts, read 187,305 times
Reputation: 142

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
so cardboard it is
LOL. Forgot to look: it's LALA land!!
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Old 09-14-2017, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Orcutt, CA (Santa Maria Valley)
3,314 posts, read 1,500,656 times
Reputation: 935
The 100th Longitude West line
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Old 09-15-2017, 09:54 AM
 
448 posts, read 421,677 times
Reputation: 725
I would say that the "West" starts with Nevada/Arizona onto CA, OR and WA.

If it were not for Utah, I would say CO is where it starts.
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Old 09-15-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,732,432 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaszilla View Post
Everything east of the Rockies is east
Nonsense, anything east of the Sierras is east. Also, anything less than 15,000 feet is a hill.
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Old 09-15-2017, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,547 posts, read 3,693,741 times
Reputation: 4136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Nonsense, anything east of the Sierras is east. Also, anything less than 15,000 feet is a hill.
I'm sure you are just being sarcastic here, but there are obviously mountain ranges east of the Sierra, and there are no peaks over 15,000 feet in the lower 48. In fact, three out of the top four peaks in the lower 48 are in Colorado, well east of the Sierra.

The east begins, IMO, where the Central Time Zone begins. Those time zone planners had it right all along. You can drive through this time zone change and immediately feel a different geography, climate, and feel.
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Old 09-16-2017, 03:07 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,457 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Nonsense, anything east of the Sierras is east. Also, anything less than 15,000 feet is a hill.
Someone from ABQ once asked me if El Paso's mountains were "behind those hills".
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Old 09-16-2017, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,897 posts, read 4,358,868 times
Reputation: 2200
Just west of Amarillo, TX.
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Old 09-16-2017, 06:11 PM
 
571 posts, read 390,612 times
Reputation: 1283
Quote:
Originally Posted by timmytimmycocopuff View Post
Geographically - west of the continental divide

Historically - St. Louis, MO

Culturally - Denver, CO
Historically, St Louis was not the beginning of the West. Independence, Missouri, outside of Kansas City was more of a "Gateway to the West" than St Louis could ever hope to be.

The Oregon Trail, Sante Fe Trail, and California Trails all started in Independence, MO, and tens of thousands of pioneers reached the town without ever setting foot in St. Louis.
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Old 09-17-2017, 07:18 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,728 posts, read 9,027,441 times
Reputation: 11104
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
Historically, St Louis was not the beginning of the West. Independence, Missouri, outside of Kansas City was more of a "Gateway to the West" than St Louis could ever hope to be.

The Oregon Trail, Sante Fe Trail, and California Trails all started in Independence, MO, and tens of thousands of pioneers reached the town without ever setting foot in St. Louis.
Yes, Independence was certainly a gateway city. It would have been interesting to see it in its heyday as the jumping off point for all of those trails. It would also have been interesting to see the landscape change at the 100th meridian before the Missouri River was dammed and before any roads were around.
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Old 02-27-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
80 posts, read 40,986 times
Reputation: 70
I don't think grouping an entire state in one region is necessary. You can't say Texas is West, or Texas is South. It has parts that are West and parts that are South.

Technically/mathematically, since West borders both, Midwest and South, from the west, and South and Midwest border each other (and let's suppose there is no 4th region here), there has to be a point where the 3 meet. Where would that be? Somewhere in Oklahoma?
A bit off-topic, but the same thing goes for Midwest-South-Northeast. Is that point somewhere in WV?
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