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Old 02-27-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,142,356 times
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The transition of east to west runs straight down the middle of the country, from mid North Dakota through mid Texas. That's where the west starts. And it's not a perfect, simple line. It's a transitioning region.

It's the big transition from the wetter, greener, and lusher eastern part of the country, to the mostly dry and open western side. It's where people initially stopped, being harder to live and thrive.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 02-27-2018 at 11:21 AM..
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Old 02-27-2018, 11:02 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,561 posts, read 3,662,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kehkou View Post
Someone from ABQ once asked me if El Paso's mountains were "behind those hills".
Yeah... the highest point in Texas is on the New Mexico border.
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Old 02-27-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,561 posts, read 3,662,092 times
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Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
Historically, St Louis was not the beginning of the West. Independence, Missouri, outside of Kansas City was more of a "Gateway to the West" than St Louis could ever hope to be.

The Oregon Trail, Sante Fe Trail, and California Trails all started in Independence, MO, and tens of thousands of pioneers reached the town without ever setting foot in St. Louis.
Neither St. Louis nor Independence are in the West but both were on the frontier and St. Louis outfitted and supplied much of the provisions and supplies of what (and who) went west. The trailheads moved west as commerce and settlement did. The Santa Fe Trail originated in Saline County near or at Arrow Rock in the 1820s but the trailhead moved toward Independence as settlement moved west.
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Old 02-28-2018, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Pueblo CO
214 posts, read 187,305 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
The transition of east to west runs straight down the middle of the country, from mid North Dakota through mid Texas. That's where the west starts. And it's not a perfect, simple line. It's a transitioning region.

It's the big transition from the wetter, greener, and lusher eastern part of the country, to the mostly dry and open western side. It's where people initially stopped, being harder to live and thrive.
With an intelligent screen name like Thoreau...you nailed it amongst those checking in for an update to this C-D thread. You confirm a post I made much earlier here months ago: A "Wayfarer Marker" I discovered years ago on the state fair grounds in Huron SD..."Here the West Begins." The marker confirms everything you posted...it IS "transitional" and mostly where the 'air' changes from East to West. Whoever placed the marker (google it) was very clairvoyant as you are. Anyone posting here who has lived in 'humidity' (or grew up as I did) and THEN moved West to what is called the "semi-arid" West can appreciate what we both are saying! Thanks and a great rest of the week to all here.
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Old 02-28-2018, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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I used to live in Des Moines. It felt culturally Midwestern. Once you get to say, Omaha, it feels more plains/rural/cowboy-ish than Midwestern IMO.
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Old 02-28-2018, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
774 posts, read 841,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Neither St. Louis nor Independence are in the West but both were on the frontier and St. Louis outfitted and supplied much of the provisions and supplies of what (and who) went west. The trailheads moved west as commerce and settlement did. The Santa Fe Trail originated in Saline County near or at Arrow Rock in the 1820s but the trailhead moved toward Independence as settlement moved west.
That said, the "First West" began west of the Appalachians, and before they were deemed southern, Kentucky, Tennessee, and sometimes even Alabama and Mississippi were deemed western in the early 1800s. Eventually, the Mississippi became the beginning right around the time St. Louis grew into a city, and thus the "Gateway of the West" nickname. By the Civil War though, the "frontier line" had reached Kansas City and Omaha, with the states from the Plains westward getting the "Far West" designation, with "Middle West" common for states east of there. It wasn't until around the turn of the 20th century that the modern West definition came about, since that was shortly after the frontier closed and modern transportation/communication started to take off. For awhile in the late 1800s, the "Western States" referred to the Midwest while the "Pacific States and Territories" referred to the proper West.

Perhaps the "biggest" definition of West came from this 1868 book, which even includes WEST VIRGINIA!

https://books.google.com/books?id=bO...states&f=false
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Old 02-28-2018, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Sacramento CA
295 posts, read 159,487 times
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Colorado
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Old 03-01-2018, 04:38 AM
 
Location: Yakima WA
4,403 posts, read 4,607,681 times
Reputation: 3848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I used to live in Des Moines. It felt culturally Midwestern. Once you get to say, Omaha, it feels more plains/rural/cowboy-ish than Midwestern IMO.
Yet Omaha feels very Midwestern compared to Western Nebraska.
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Old 03-01-2018, 05:40 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,728 posts, read 9,027,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I used to live in Des Moines. It felt culturally Midwestern. Once you get to say, Omaha, it feels more plains/rural/cowboy-ish than Midwestern IMO.
I know it's blasphemy to say this in Iowa, but I think the eastern two thirds of Nebraska are nearly identical to Iowa in terms of landscape and culture.
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Old 03-01-2018, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Pueblo CO
214 posts, read 187,305 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Yeah... the highest point in Texas is on the New Mexico border.
Yeah and as New Mexicans are famed to say: "If god or someone wanted Texas to have mountains (I know don't troll me...the Guadalupe Mtns on the Texas side that some just call "hills") he would have but he didn't." Fact is history tells us that Texas wanted to "grab New Mexico" also but they were prevented. Thank goodness for that...they're big enough! The trade-off for New Mexico was to give West Texas their water.
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