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Old 08-10-2012, 06:12 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
Reputation: 13287

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
indeed, ha ha ha....those mountain people, I mean really now.
West River has a completely different feel than East River. West River is mostly ranches, badlands, Black Hills, and East River is mostly agriculture and ranches with much flatter topography.
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Old 08-10-2012, 07:37 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,443,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
West River has a completely different feel than East River. West River is mostly ranches, badlands, Black Hills, and East River is mostly agriculture and ranches with much flatter topography.
West River is also drier than East River. Sioux Falls and Rapid City have a completely different feel.
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Old 08-10-2012, 07:46 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeagleLady View Post
West River is also drier than East River. Sioux Falls and Rapid City have a completely different feel.
Agreed. Rapid City is in the West, similiar in culture to Denver while Rapid City is in the Midwest, similar in culture to Des Moines.
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:48 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
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You hit the Geographic West once you reach Western Louisiana/Texas. You hit the cultural West, once you reach the Trans-Pecos Region/Horn of Texas. Once you get out there, you're geographically closer to Los Angeles than you are to New Orleans, let alone Atlanta. There's still vestiges of Southern Culture out there, but overall, it's not the same. It's just not the same.
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Old 08-11-2012, 09:04 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,108,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
You hit the Geographic West once you reach Western Louisiana/Texas.
I wouldn't go that far, Polo. Topographically/Physiologically speaking, the "Geographic West" begins quite a bit west of ANY part of Louisiana. East Texas is definitely exempt..and it is even argruable along the Cross Timbers regions of North Central Texas...

But to be fair, I might have misunderstood what you said! If so, I apologize!

Quote:
You hit the cultural West, once you reach the Trans-Pecos Region/Horn of Texas. Once you get out there, you're geographically closer to Los Angeles than you are to New Orleans, let alone Atlanta. There's still vestiges of Southern Culture out there, but overall, it's not the same. It's just not the same.
I agree with this totally. Incoming rep point, Polo! Well put!
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Old 08-12-2012, 03:25 AM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 6,118,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastphilly View Post
I'm right along with you my friend. I also agree the West ends at the Eastern front of the Rockies!
Again, does this mean Denver and Cheyenne are not part of the West since they are technically east of the Rockies?
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Old 08-12-2012, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,226,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamiman View Post
Again, does this mean Denver and Cheyenne are not part of the West since they are technically east of the Rockies?
Agreed. I'm taking back my earlier statement and disagreeing that the Rockies are the boundary of the west. I would include all of Colorado, all of New Mexico, all of Wyoming, all of Montana, as well as the far western parts of Nebraska, Kansas, South Dakota, North Dakota, Oklahoma (mainly the western panhandle), and southwest Texas...approximately the longitude of San Antonio. Having driven all of these areas, I would say that these are pretty good boundaries.
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Old 08-12-2012, 04:10 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,298,468 times
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Quote:
Again, does this mean Denver and Cheyenne are not part of the West since they are technically east of the Rockies?
Sure; it might. I definitely wouldn't consider Denver a "western" city in the usual sense.
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Old 08-12-2012, 04:45 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,932,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tablemtn View Post
Sure; it might. I definitely wouldn't consider Denver a "western" city in the usual sense.
Denver is definitely western in climate. It only averages 14 inches of precipitation a year. This is common precip average for a number of areas in the West. The East averages far more precipitation and is much greener with more trees.
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Old 08-13-2012, 05:32 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,721 posts, read 9,018,166 times
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Two places where I've seen a geographical distinction between the West and the Midwest are Chamberlain, SD and Big Springs, NE.

Chamberlain sits right on the Missouri River and the two sides have a stark difference. West of Chamberlain you get into more arid country whereas east of it you get the much greener farm country common in the Midwest. Big Springs is similar although it doesn't sit on a river. The transition in Nebraska seems more subtle. I don't know where the line is in North Dakota since I haven't been there in a long time, but if you stop at Theodore Roosevelt National Park closer to the Montana border it is vastly different from Fargo. I'm wondering if Kansas has a line like this as well. I've only been through it once in the winter.
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