U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-10-2013, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,653 posts, read 15,327,023 times
Reputation: 6670

Advertisements

In Minnesota, it's German by far.

I suppose it's the same in Wisconsin and South / North Dakota.

Other common ones here are Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, and Irish.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2013, 04:15 PM
 
349 posts, read 606,991 times
Reputation: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
In Minnesota, it's German by far.

I suppose it's the same in Wisconsin and South / North Dakota.

Other common ones here are Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish, and Irish.
Well, in 2010 the principal ancestries in Minnesota were:

German: 37,9 %
Scandinavians: 32,1 %

It's pretty tight. I've never been to Minnesota but I've always heard there was a greater Scandinavians influence, I rarely heard about Germans even though I knew there's a large population over there. Am I wrong ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2013, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,141,440 times
Reputation: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Georgia was a British penal colony. That might explain it.

Penal colony - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Actually, no. That's a common misconception. Georgia was founded as a colony for the "worthy poor" as an alternative to debtors prisons. They were able to convince the King that that was a good idea, because the English were afraid the Spanish would cease South Carolina.

But Georgia was only this philanthropic enterprise from 1732 to 1749. After that point, there weren't enough willing poor people in England to populate Georgia, so it legalized slavery (one of the only places where slavery was illegal before that point) and modeled itself after South Carolina. South Carolinians moved down into Georgia and began to dominate the colony. Savannah became a mini-Charleston. 1752 was the year it officially became a royal colony.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2013, 07:56 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Actually, no. That's a common misconception. Georgia was founded as a colony for the "worthy poor" as an alternative to debtors prisons. They were able to convince the King that that was a good idea, because the English were afraid the Spanish would cease South Carolina.

But Georgia was only this philanthropic enterprise from 1732 to 1749. After that point, there weren't enough willing poor people in England to populate Georgia, so it legalized slavery (one of the only places where slavery was illegal before that point) and modeled itself after South Carolina. South Carolinians moved down into Georgia and began to dominate the colony. Savannah became a mini-Charleston. 1752 was the year it officially became a royal colony.
Thanks for clarifying.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2013, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,141,440 times
Reputation: 809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Thanks for clarifying.
No problem. Georgia's interesting. If it was founded 50 years earlier, maybe the experiment would have worked and it would have been a symbol of freedom. But it just didn't work out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2013, 10:49 PM
 
455 posts, read 915,587 times
Reputation: 438
I believe "British" as a whole as in: English, Scotch-Irish, Scottish and Northern Irish would be the number 1 reported ethnicity if more people used the term "british" to report their ancestry.

I believe the vast majority of southerners are of one or a combination of those backgrounds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2013, 01:50 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,562 posts, read 7,667,463 times
Reputation: 4367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
I believe "British" as a whole as in: English, Scotch-Irish, Scottish and Northern Irish would be the number 1 reported ethnicity if more people used the term "british" to report their ancestry.

I believe the vast majority of southerners are of one or a combination of those backgrounds.
yep,

It is also common to see small amounts of French thanks to residents of Mobile and New Orleans that moved throughout the region and bit of Indian, particularly Cherokee.

I'd say a stereotypical native Georgian is 1/16th French, 1/16th, 3/8 Scotch-Irish, and half British
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2013, 08:02 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,748,793 times
Reputation: 926
The best way to answer this question: what percentage of white Americans can trace their ancestry to colonial times? There were far more of English ancestry than other group, Germans were a very sizeable group in Pennsylvania (where they made up about a third of the population) but less than 10% of the American population in 1790.

Outside of Pennsylvania and the Midwest I'm pretty certain there are more people of English ancestry than German ancestry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2013, 11:49 AM
 
349 posts, read 606,991 times
Reputation: 352
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
The best way to answer this question: what percentage of white Americans can trace their ancestry to colonial times? There were far more of English ancestry than other group, Germans were a very sizeable group in Pennsylvania (where they made up about a third of the population) but less than 10% of the American population in 1790.

Outside of Pennsylvania and the Midwest I'm pretty certain there are more people of English ancestry than German ancestry.
Approximately 53 percent of European Americans today are of colonial ancestry, and 47 percent are descended from European, Canadian, or Latin American immigrants who have come to the U.S. since 1790. Americans of English ancestry were 60.9% of the European American population, I'm not very good at math but their number should be much more than 25 million today.

We all know southerners are mainly of colonial background but I'm sure there are many northerners who are as well but they don't know it.

Last edited by Smash XY; 04-15-2013 at 11:59 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2013, 01:02 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,748,793 times
Reputation: 926
Yes, so English outnumbered German by more than six to one in colonial America, and though the Germans outnumbered the English in the 19th and 20th centuries, I'm pretty sure the ratio was much less than six to one.

Only in Pennsylvania were the Germans really that big. And PA is probably the only state where colonial-era German ancestry outnumbers 19th century German ancestry.

Indeed even in the Midwest there are states where I'd think there are more of English ancestry than German. For instance Michigan was settled primarily by Yankees (Yankees already greatly outnumbered Yorkers in New York State) and it also received many Canadians most of whom were of British ancestry. Indiana was settled by Virginians, and while there was German immigration I'm pretty sure they never outnumbered the "old stock" there.

In the Upper Midwest (Wisconsin, Minnesota, the Dakotas) there are clearly far more of German than English ancestry and very few people are of colonial-era (primarily Yankee) stock.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top