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Old 04-16-2013, 11:20 AM
 
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In the Northeast they'd be mostly Catholic. In the South, overwhelmingly Protestant Scots-Irish.
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:32 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
In the Northeast they'd be mostly Catholic. In the South, overwhelmingly Protestant Scots-Irish.
Anyone have an idea what percent of white southerners are scotch-irish rather than english. [Someone might have already posted] Obviously,mostly mixed by now, probably why many respond "American". But may be a breakdown by ancestry is possible. I suspect, there are large regional differences, with Scots-Irish concentrate in Appalachia.
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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I was always under the impression that English was more common in the Deep South and the tidewater, where Scotch-Irish was more common in the mountains, the upper south and much of Texas. Correct me if I am wrong though.
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Old 04-16-2013, 12:35 PM
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Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
I suspect there may be spots in Northern New England where that's not too rare, but I agree it'd have to be rather isolated.



I'd assume most of those are Irish Catholic, but I may have a regional bias. A lot of these ancestry patterns are strongly regional. Where I grew up (Long Island) it was a good assumption if someone had a German sounding last-name, he/she was Jewish (due to Yiddish). Someone* I knew from rural PA who moved to New York City with German last names got people assuming he was Jewish by his name.

*He might be close to 100% "colonial", but there's probably at least an 1/8, maybe 1/4 from more recent times.
In the midwest, people with German sounding names are assumed to be German Lutherans or Catholics.
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Old 04-16-2013, 12:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Anyone have an idea what percent of white southerners are scotch-irish rather than english. [Someone might have already posted] Obviously,mostly mixed by now, probably why many respond "American". But may be a breakdown by ancestry is possible. I suspect, there are large regional differences, with Scots-Irish concentrate in Appalachia.
I read this article Scotch-Irish descendants in Springfield about the Scotch-Irish who settled in southern Missouri and northern Arkansas. It seems like they're the largest ancestry in the Orzak region too. I think most people think of Scotch-Irish as hillbillies who only stay in Appalachia and nowhere else. Over the years they settled the entire south like other early Anglo American settlers and even the southern part of some midwestern states such as Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. When we talk about Anglo American migration, we automatically think about those of English ancestry because they're the most numerous but Scotch-Irish were also present.That's why when the author Jim Webb say the true number of people with some Scotch-Irish heritage is about 27 million I think he may be possible.

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I was always under the impression that English was more common in the Deep South and the tidewater, where Scotch-Irish was more common in the mountains, the upper south and much of Texas. Correct me if I am wrong though.
Texas has more people of English descent than Scotch-Irish but I've doubt about states like Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma and maybe West Virginia. It seems like Scotch-Irish ancestry is bigger than English in those states.
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Old 04-17-2013, 10:24 AM
 
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Not according to the 1980 census.
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Old 04-17-2013, 02:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Not according to the 1980 census.
I know but the percentage of Scotch-Irish is close to the percentage of English in those states. In 1990 census, Irish is the largest ancestry in Arkansas ahead of German, English and American ancestry. I still think English is the largest ancestry in every southern states (except Louisiana) but in some states Scottish/Scotch-Irish ancestry is probably slightly behind English ancestry.
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Old 04-17-2013, 03:04 PM
 
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Hundreds of years after 18th century German immigrants anglicized their names, are their descendants aware of their German ancestry?

Not only were the surnames of many colonial German settlers anglicized, sometimes the surnames were changed to sound Scotch-Irish, if they were living in a Scotch-Irish community.

Surnames that are sometimes anglicized German surnames include Baker, Bates, Brown, Black, Carpenter, Cook, Foster, Fox, Haines, Hayes, Hill, Jones, Kerr, King, Lewis, Long, Marshall, Reed, Rice, Smith, Taylor, Weaver, White, Williams and Young.

Last edited by The Ancient Oracle; 04-17-2013 at 03:32 PM..
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by The Ancient Oracle View Post
Hundreds of years after 18th century German immigrants anglicized their names, are their descendants aware of their German ancestry?

Not only were the surnames of many colonial German settlers anglicized, sometimes the surnames were changed to sound Scotch-Irish, if they were living in a Scotch-Irish community.

Surnames that are sometimes anglicized German surnames include Baker, Bates, Brown, Black, Carpenter, Cook, Foster, Fox, Haines, Hayes, Hill, Jones, Kerr, King, Lewis, Long, Marshall, Reed, Rice, Smith, Taylor, Weaver, White, Williams and Young.
In colonial era Scotch-Irish didn't interact much with Germans, they were an isolated ethnic group. It's true some Europeans anglicized their names but not all British surnames are anglicization and the issue is many people think this is the case. Names like Smith, Williams and Jones are very popular in Britain so it's maybe not an anglicization. On the other side, names like Johnson, Anderson and Miller in Midwest are probably more an anglicization rather than people of British heritage.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:10 PM
 
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50 Million+ isn't enough for you? Do you think that there are less than 25 Million Americans of English descent?

I think all that "Anglicization" is overstated anyway. Where is the proof that so many people changed their original surnames to common British ones? I'm referring to the time of the Colonies!

Is it like the absolute truth that America could have been a German speaking country?


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