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Old 04-17-2013, 04:13 PM
 
87 posts, read 193,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smash XY View Post
In colonial era Scotch-Irish didn't interact much with Germans, they were an isolated ethnic group.
I think the Germans and the Scotch-Irish intermarried quite a bit in Western Pennsylvania and North Carolina.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:21 PM
 
87 posts, read 193,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArsenalFC View Post
50 Million+ isn't enough for you? Do you think that there are less than 25 Million Americans of English descent?

I think all that "Anglicization" is overstated anyway. Where is the proof that so many people changed their original surnames to common British ones? I'm referring to the time of the Colonies!

Is it like the absolute truth that America could have been a German speaking country?


When you do colonial family history research, you see a lot of anglicization of German surnames.

I'd say the number of Americans of English descent is underestimated, but also that the number of Americans of German descent is also underestimated, because of the anglicization of German surnames.
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Old 04-17-2013, 04:35 PM
 
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Most people with British surnames during the colonial period, came from Britain. The English were in America for a long enough time, with a large enough group of Immigrants to ensure they remained dominant. The largest single group from the British isles to America, were the Scotch-Irish, but this was over 100 years after the English founded Jamestown.

The Scottish/Scotch-Irish were the second largest group during the entire colonial period. Germans were only 3rd.
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Old 04-17-2013, 05:15 PM
 
350 posts, read 608,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ancient Oracle View Post
When you do colonial family history research, you see a lot of anglicization of German surnames.

I'd say the number of Americans of English descent is underestimated, but also that the number of Americans of German descent is also underestimated, because of the anglicization of German surnames.
Since 1980 the number of German Americans is constant. There was a peak in 1990 with 57 million of Americans of German heritage but otherwise the number is still around 50 million. Most people, even in the south, are generally aware if they have German ancestry, some still have German surnames in their family. IMO German ancestry is maybe a little bit overrated because some Swiss and Austrian were listed as Germans when they came in America because Germany wasn't a country yet. I think it's true that 50 million Americans have some Germans ancestry but 25 million Americans of English ancestry it's very underrated.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:58 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,753,027 times
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The proportion of non-Hispanic whites has dropped from close to 80% in 1980 to 64% in 2010, so obviously the proportion (though not the raw number) of Americans of English or German ancestry has declined.

Note also that not only a lot of colonial stock Americans were declaring American ancestry, but a good number were not reporting anything at all. I reported it for 1980 earlier, not sure what the numbers were in 2010.

Wikipedia suggests 80 million have some English ancestry, but I'm unaware of the original source of the claim. German ancestry must number at least 60 million.

It's probably reasonable to assume that 80% of "American Americans" have at least some English ancestry, and virtually all (i.e. 95%) had some British (English, Scottish, Scots-Irish and Welsh) ancestry. There would be some German in the mix but a lot less, probably less than 10%: first of all because there were a lot fewer of them (less than 10% of colonial America), second because where colonial German ancestry is most common (Pennsylvania) the number of "American Americans" isn't all that high.
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Old 04-18-2013, 05:32 AM
 
44 posts, read 58,750 times
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They've recently launched a new satellite channel over here called PBS-UK. At the moment they are showing re-runs of the show, "Finding your Roots", and were talking to, Robert Downey Junior and Maggie Gyllenhaal.

Maggie Gyllenhaal, thought that her ancestry was Swedish and Russian Jewish, when in fact, her father was mostly of English descent, going back to the founding colonist's of New England.


Finding your roots


I wonder how many "Maggie Gyllenhaal's" there are in America?
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Old 04-18-2013, 07:08 AM
 
824 posts, read 1,464,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArsenalFC View Post
They've recently launched a new satellite channel over here called PBS-UK. At the moment they are showing re-runs of the show, "Finding your Roots", and were talking to, Robert Downey Junior and Maggie Gyllenhaal.

Maggie Gyllenhaal, thought that her ancestry was Swedish and Russian Jewish, when in fact, her father was mostly of English descent, going back to the founding colonist's of New England.


Finding your roots


I wonder how many "Maggie Gyllenhaal's" there are in America?


Okay, everybody is English. Hapy now?
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Old 04-18-2013, 05:40 PM
 
20 posts, read 53,919 times
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English, surely. They were already the majority of whites in 1790, when the first census was taken. Since being white descendant of English (or the UK in general) is synonymous with being American. Until the late 19th century, the English Americans were more numerous than all other European groups together. It's almost impossible that the Germans have become the dominant ethnic group in so little time.

The census results show such large numbers to countries such as Germany and Ireland because the people who came from there to America had more difficulty to adapt to American society (which was dominated by British-descent people)

Tell yourself descendant of English in the U.S. is the same as saying that it is descended from Spanish in Argentina or Portuguese in Brazil, is so common that people prefer to ignore because it doesn't make you special or very different from others.

Just look at the family tree of politicians, actors, singers, porn stars and other American professionals: most of them can return much of its origin to the UK, far more than in Germany.

For example, it's very common for people to talk about the Irish ancestry of Obama's mother, but never say that it's also partly English. Why? Because it's very common. When the Republican Party announced the candidacy of Paul Ryan as vice president, some Irish Americans said the GOP was appealing to the Irish public. But it's also partly English. Why nobody talked about this fact? Because it's too common to be cited.

Therefore, by analyzing the history of the U.S., German ancestry is not greater than English.
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Old 04-18-2013, 06:10 PM
 
7,598 posts, read 9,455,321 times
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I don't think that it was ever really possible that the US would become a German-speaking nation, as immigration to America in colonial days was heavily from the British Isles...
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Old 04-18-2013, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Charleston, South Carolina
9,634 posts, read 13,796,583 times
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My parents stirred up the gene pool. While both come from overwhelmingly English lineage, my mother has a trace of German ancestry and she's from South Carolina while my dad is from Indiana. Thank God. I wouldn't want to be my own cousin.
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