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Old 04-22-2013, 04:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ancient Oracle View Post
Yes, many Irish surnames were anglicized back in Ireland, but then these surnames were sometimes even further anglicized in America. For example, Laoghaire became O'Leary in Ireland, and then might become something else in colonial America, such as Larrie or Larry.
Can you provide a link that proves this?

Lawrie, Laurie, Larrie, Larry, Laurie, Laury, Lawry, Lowrie are all Scottish surnames. There is history of Scottish families with this last name moving to Ireland.

The Scottish/Scotch-Irish were the 2nd largest group in America, during the colonial period.
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Old 04-22-2013, 05:24 PM
 
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It isn't just surnames that allows historians to know that the English were by far the largest number of colonial settlers, followed by the Scottish/Scots-Irish. There are passenger lists, the 1790 census, other primary data, etc. The odd colonial American named "Smith" who was really "Schmidt" was an exception to the rule, not the norm.
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Old 04-22-2013, 05:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArsenalFC View Post
Can you provide a link that proves this?

Lawrie, Laurie, Larrie, Larry, Laurie, Laury, Lawry, Lowrie are all Scottish surnames. There is history of Scottish families with this last name moving to Ireland.

The Scottish/Scotch-Irish were the 2nd largest group in America, during the colonial period.
I'm not saying that all people with the surname Larrie or Larry were formerly named O'Leary. However, it sometimes happened that way. For example, Timothy Ragan married Mary Lary in 1703 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. His surname was originally Riagain or O'Reagan and her surname was originally Laoghaire or O'Leary.

Sometimes the name O'Reagan or Reagan was further anglicized to Riggin.
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:06 PM
 
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Exactly..."sometimes." Doesn't change the general picture very much.
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:12 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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There's probably more German ancestry in the US, but American culture is undoubtedly much more influenced by England than Germany. We would probably be part of the Commonwealth if the Revolution hadn't been so violent.
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Here's the map of Irish prevalence from the 2000 census.



The vast majority of self-reported Irish ancestry is in the Northeast and Midwest, which strongly suggests it's Irish Catholic, not Scots Irish.
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Old 04-22-2013, 07:11 PM
 
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Yes. Different from 1980 when Irish ancestry Protestants probably outnumbered Irish ancestry Catholics.
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Old 04-23-2013, 09:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Yes. Different from 1980 when Irish ancestry Protestants probably outnumbered Irish ancestry Catholics.
I'm not sure about that. I think since since the beginning of the 20th century, Irish Catholic ancestry outnumbered Scotch-Irish ancestry. The Irish immigration was really big in the 19th century. If you count Scots/Scotch-Irish ancestry as a single ancestry with the real number it may outnumber Irish ancestry.
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Old 04-23-2013, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Relevant
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smash XY View Post
I'm not sure about that. I think since since the beginning of the 20th century, Irish Catholic ancestry outnumbered Scotch-Irish ancestry. The Irish immigration was really big in the 19th century. If you count Scots/Scotch-Irish ancestry as a single ancestry with the real number it may outnumber Irish ancestry.
Something like a third of the "Irish" in 1980 were in the South and that group is overwhelmingly Protestant. My point is they identified as Irish in 1980 but not so much anymore, but in the Northeast Irish ancestry has remained relatively stable.
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