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Old 08-17-2013, 09:41 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smash XY View Post

In the Mid-Atlantic, English people were overtaken by others immigrants since a long time ago so I get that. I'm not doubting the power of assimilation. I believe when 50 millions Americans said they have German ancestry but we shouldn't overestimated that either. I've met people who know that some immigrants anglicized their names so they assume that all American names of British origins aren't real. Personnaly I think there is still more people of colonial background rather that post-Revolutionnary immigrants.
For New York City in 1960, it was estimated about 5% were of English/Dutch heritage. I found a 22% Protestant in 1950 (and 26% Jewish and about half Catholic), of which probably nearly half were black. The suburbs of the city likely reflect that. Definitely more German than English, but German isn't one of the largest ancestries.
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Old 08-17-2013, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tribecavsbrowns View Post
I take it you don't hang out in Georgetown or Old Town Alexandria.
Not if I can avoid it. Although, I've never met anyone in Georgetown who actually lives in Georgetown (not counting the university).
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Old 08-18-2013, 10:04 AM
 
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I've met people who know that some immigrants anglicized their names so they assume that all American names of British origins aren't real. Personnaly I think there is still more people of colonial background rather that post-Revolutionnary immigrants.
This is an important point. You see it countless times on the Internet:

"My last name is Taylor. Where did my ancestors come from?"

"Taylor is an English name, but considering only a few English people ever came to America, you can't be English. This is because the entire world -- minus the English -- migrated to America in ridiculous numbers. Oh, and they all decided to pay homage to the English, by taking their Surnames.



Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
There were still English immigrants after the Revolution, though I don't know in what numbers.
Nice of you to admit that much.

Between 1820 - 1975, they estimate that 3,136,572 English people emigrated to the US. A huge percentage of these people moved across America, yes a lot remained in the North-East, but the majority went West.
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Old 08-18-2013, 08:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Apparently that Norse poster can. I think his post was mostly a bunch of rubbish though. Any of those pictures he posted could refer to any ethnic group in northern Europe.
All ethnicities in europe look quite different and distinctive to eachother, the British and Irish people being some of the most distinctive due to Isolation. I never confuse groups of British/Irish people with continental europeans or scandianvians. I can of agree with norse, there are faces much more common than others in different countries.

A guy like Brian may or wayne rooney will be 100 times more common in the UK than he will be in Germany or anywhere else, so a guy like oliver khan or jurgen klinsmann is much more common among germans than among brits. When you see different nationalities you can see different frequencies of facial structures, body types, hair colors and the combination of them which make them distinctive, thats how people usually can tell apart different nationalities.

Wouldnt you say boris yeltsin or vladimir putin look more russian than they look italian?

Take a trip to the UK/ireland and then to Germany, you will notice how the bulk of British Islanders can pass for regular whites in the states any day of the week, but germans look foreign/different compared to the bulk of white americans.
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Old 08-19-2013, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArsenalFC View Post
Nice of you to admit that much.

Between 1820 - 1975, they estimate that 3,136,572 English people emigrated to the US. A huge percentage of these people moved across America, yes a lot remained in the North-East, but the majority went West.
"Admit" is probably not the best description of what I said. Point out, is probably a little more accurate.

Anyway, I was mostly talking from my experience. Of 36 friends I interact with a lot (pulled straight from the top of my head), I have eight with German last names, five with Spanish last names, four with Italian names, four with Irish names, and three with English names I know were not changed (I have a couple Greek friends with changed names).
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Old 08-19-2013, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Chapelboro
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Interesting discussion. Came in a few years late on it, and didn't read all 23 pages, but still interesting.

From my perspective in the South, almost everyone I know has some English ancestry. I have all of the above — English (on my mom & dad's side), Scottish (on my Dad's side), Scotch-Irish/Ulster Scots (on my Mom's side) and German (on my mom's side).

I would think that English predominates for all the reasons y'all have enumerated. "German" is a little more exotic and "English" is a little more passť.

In a very unscientific survey of most recent posters among my facebook friends (not relatives) I found English surnames outnumbered German surnames more than 2 to 1 (30 to 13) — that is not including Scottish or Irish surnames. British/UK vs German is more like 3 to 1 (43 to 13). I also had a smattering of Italian, Asian, French, Dutch, Welsh, and Mexican surnames show up as well as African American, but for the most part those were English/Scottish surnames.

Interestingly some of my English friends (as in born in England and still speak with a British accent) have Italian surnames.
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Old 08-19-2013, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
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german by far.
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Old 08-19-2013, 09:24 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poppydog View Post

I would think that English predominates for all the reasons y'all have enumerated. "German" is a little more exotic and "English" is a little more passť.
That's true in the south. Much of the rest of the country, probably not.
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Old 08-20-2013, 01:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's true in the south. Much of the rest of the country, probably not.
In the Midwest, German beats English there's no doubt about it. In the West I think is pretty tight between English and German. In the 1980 U.S census English ancestry surpassed German ancestry in all the western states except in Colorado, Wyoming and Montana but since 1990 and the addition of the choice American ancestry, German is the largest ancestry in the west.

1980 U.S Census

English ancestry: 10,266,505
German ancestry: 8,876,940

1990 U.S Census

English ancestry: 8,109,565
German ancestry: 10,910,791
American ancestry: 1,357,965
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Old 08-21-2013, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Chapelboro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's true in the south. Much of the rest of the country, probably not.
True that German ancestry is more "exotic" and English ancestry is more "passť" in the South and not in the other areas of the country or are you saying that there are more folks of German ancestry in the other areas of the country? I think German ancestry, no matter how common, is always going to be more "exotic" because they speak a different language.

I think most of us are so mixed up that we've got some of everything, but there are so many people of English ancestry in the US that I would find it hard to believe that folks in the Midwest or wherever don't have ANY English ancestry and are pure German. I do have German ancestry (can trace it back to Leipzig in the early 1800s), but also have English, Scottish, Ulster Scots, too.

I live in NC, one of the most populous regions of the South and the US (in the top ten for states by population) many of my friends are not originally from here. I have lots of friends from Ohio, California, New York, Michigan, Illinois, Kansas, in addition to NC, Georgia, Florida, Texas, Virginia, etc. So while my facebook friend survey was pretty much as far from scientific as you can get it was not necessarily biased toward the South. Many of the folks I'm friends with don't even live in NC.

I'm sticking with English as most prevalent if not predominate. A person might be more proud of their German heritage, but I bet they've got some English in there, too, with a great grandad or something.
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