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Old 08-25-2010, 10:34 AM
 
7,596 posts, read 9,450,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Heh, I remember when that song came out back in the 80s or so.

That "wassup" mock-up was a bona-fide Budweiser commercial that ran in Wisconsin markets. It's one of the few places you can run a commercial featuring a dead deer flung across the roof of a station wagon without upsetting the general population

Yaaah....Yaaah...couldn't help but chuckle at this, you betcha;

The other one, the Hey Der Milwaukee Polka, is pretty amusing, too..

"Hey der, Polka Boy, go home and suck a beer..
"Hey der, Bratwurst Head, drive the old John Deere.."

Those poor Wisconsinites...God bless them
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Old 09-05-2010, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Cali
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I can bet that its German. Germans have been immigrating to the US since 1683 so its no surprise.
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Old 09-06-2010, 01:11 PM
 
Location: the dairyland
1,195 posts, read 1,926,128 times
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Even if so, what's the big deal?
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Old 09-06-2010, 01:24 PM
 
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I'm a MUTT. German, Dutch, Irish, Scottish, a little French, a little Spanish and a little Japanese, a true AMERICAN.
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Old 09-21-2010, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 33,962,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Yeah the South is more British and I'd think more English too. (The mountainous areas of the South are more Scotch-Irish, but even then they received a fair amount of English) A few states in New England, mostly Maine and New Hampshire, are still fairly English.

It might be difficult to determine. The English had a certain disdain for "ethnic mixing", and much later identifying as English-descended developed a snooty image, so people of partial English-ancestry probably didn't/don't count themselves as English that often. However people of partial German ancestry, even though they assimilated greatly, I think are more likely to count themselves as German if they have the German surname. I have an English surname, and English might be my main ancestry, but I think I generally state my ancestry as "English, Dutch, Belgian, Scottish" or "very white."

As I think I mentioned earlier many African Americans likely do have English ancestors, in a few cases they might even have more English ancestors than African ones, but would likely not list themselves as "English" or be seen as such. An olive-skinned person with the surname "Guaraldi" might not be seen, or see themselves, as English even if three of their grandparents are English folk from Devon.
A while back I found out, to my astonishment, that my father's direct paternal ancestral line went to England, and that he also had some Scottish and Irish roots. I also found out that many of his ancestors as well were German (I share a couple of family lines with one poster on this topic, in fact); in fact more of his European ancestors were German (or Swiss or Alsatian) than any other group. Funny thing is, because I am from Pennsylvania and light-skinned, many people used to tell me I had Germans in my background, and I denied it, partially because I didn't know, and partially because I never thought it were possible. Yes, just as many African Americans have English roots, or other British roots, as many Latinos have Spanish roots. The difference is that blacks in America do not identify at all with this heritage, while in Latin America (where my mother is from), they do.
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Old 10-01-2010, 07:00 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,830 posts, read 21,140,229 times
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Historically people in the less affluent parts of a country are more likely to immigrate than the rich aristocrats are. For example, any where in America you see tons of Mexican immigrations from the poor areas of that country, personally I've never met an affluent Mexican of Spanish decent who is of the aristocratic class.

In Colonial and post Revolutionary America far more of the discriminated Celtic peoples in the United Kingdom immigrated here than there English counterparts. In Northern Ireland alone 500,000 Scottish Presbyterians immigrated to Appalachia after Queen Anne's 1705 edict banned all non Anglican/ Church of England churches.

Most people who list "American" on the census have at least as much Scottish or Welsh heritage as English.
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Old 10-01-2010, 10:05 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,964,539 times
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Oh I suppose, but the English did have a lower-class. I don't think much of the Midlands or Yorkshire were too affluent then or now. Although the Midlands English I guess went more to the Mid-Atlantic states like Delaware and Pennsylvania.
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Old 10-01-2010, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 89,196,393 times
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Lots of folks from Cornwall ended up in Wisconsin. That's how the state got its nickname "The Badger State," "badger" being a reference to all the Cornish miners burrowing into the ground.
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Old 10-01-2010, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Miami / Florida / U.S.A.
684 posts, read 1,293,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
German is far more reported, but I find it hard to believe it's more common than English ancestry. Do you think English ancestry is actually more common and just isn't reported as often since it's seen by many as "ordinary American" ancestry?

German is the largest ancestry, and Mexican is the second largest.
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Old 12-05-2010, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Cali
3,904 posts, read 6,197,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edu983 View Post
German is the largest ancestry, and Mexican is the second largest.
Mexican will be the first largest very soon.
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