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Old 07-12-2010, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Tampa
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How can we move desalinated water from the coasts to inland areas?

What are the limits?
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Old 07-12-2010, 06:01 PM
 
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There are these strange contraptions called pipes. they are usually made of this stuff called metal ( steel or copper) Most modern societies have them since before the Romans.
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Old 07-12-2010, 07:15 PM
 
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Well it depends how much energy you want to use doing it and how to power such things. Another issue is its more energy intensive the further above sea level you go.

I remember hearing a lot of people during the water shortage in Atlanta 3 years ago say to try to get water from the ocean. The issue is Atlanta is about 200 miles away and 1000 feet up so a lot of energy is needed for a large scale operation. You might need to build a nuclear power plant just for desalinization and transport of that much water, and that brings a whole new set of issues to the table.
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Old 07-13-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Tampa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
Well it depends how much energy you want to use doing it and how to power such things. Another issue is its more energy intensive the further above sea level you go.

I remember hearing a lot of people during the water shortage in Atlanta 3 years ago say to try to get water from the ocean. The issue is Atlanta is about 200 miles away and 1000 feet up so a lot of energy is needed for a large scale operation. You might need to build a nuclear power plant just for desalinization and transport of that much water, and that brings a whole new set of issues to the table.
Exactly. And how would you go about getting it to the middle of the country (the bread basket)? Or Denver?


Quote:
Originally Posted by PittNewbie View Post
There are these strange contraptions called pipes. they are usually made of this stuff called metal ( steel or copper) Most modern societies have them since before the Romans.
see above
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Old 07-13-2010, 04:56 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
Exactly. And how would you go about getting it to the middle of the country (the bread basket)? Or Denver?




see above
Same way they move crude oil 800 miles utilizing the Alaskan Pipeline. This isn't rocket science, it has been done for hundreds of years. Even the Romans had aqueducts that could move water long distances.
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Old 07-13-2010, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Tampa
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Not sure if it would be quite so easy when moving enough water to irrigate the bread basket.

some would have to be diverted from the Mississippi I am sure, but still alot of water.

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Old 07-13-2010, 09:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalblue View Post
Not sure if it would be quite so easy when moving enough water to irrigate the bread basket.

some would have to be diverted from the Mississippi I am sure, but still alot of water.


And in a lot of that region the issue is more often too much water. The areas that would need it are the high plains since the rest of the area will have more than enough water most years. If you were wanting to irrigate there it is better to put resivoirs along the rivers and pump from there. Then it is shorter and no desalinization issues.
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Old 07-13-2010, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Maybe 10 million people should not live in a place like Pheonix Az. If you really want to live in the desert that bad then maybe the residents of those areas should be the ones to pony up the millions needed to build the desalination plants, and the infrastructure to deliver the water. Living in the upper midwest I should never have to pay for water, as I am surrounded by trillions and trillions of gallons of the stuff. And the answer will always be no, you cannot have great lakes water. Not now, not ever. Everyone likes to badmouth states like Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota for the cold weather and bad economy but one thing we always will have is the water.
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Old 07-14-2010, 08:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Maybe 10 million people should not live in a place like Pheonix Az. If you really want to live in the desert that bad then maybe the residents of those areas should be the ones to pony up the millions needed to build the desalination plants, and the infrastructure to deliver the water. Living in the upper midwest I should never have to pay for water, as I am surrounded by trillions and trillions of gallons of the stuff. And the answer will always be no, you cannot have great lakes water. Not now, not ever. Everyone likes to badmouth states like Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota for the cold weather and bad economy but one thing we always will have is the water.
I don't think the Southwest would ever consider Great Lakes water due to having to go over a continental divide for it along with nearly 2000 miles of distance. (Also Canada would say no as well) Arizona would have to get water most likely from the Gulf of California. (right now it would be real funny seeing them ask Mexico for this) That would be the point of entry for desalinized water into Arizona and Las Vegas.
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Old 07-14-2010, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
I don't think the Southwest would ever consider Great Lakes water due to having to go over a continental divide for it along with nearly 2000 miles of distance. (Also Canada would say no as well) Arizona would have to get water most likely from the Gulf of California. (right now it would be real funny seeing them ask Mexico for this) That would be the point of entry for desalinized water into Arizona and Las Vegas.
I think I can speak for the citizenry of Phoenix and say that we don't want any illegal water coming over from Mexico!
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