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Old 07-22-2010, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,527,823 times
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In my opinion:

The southern boundary of the Midwest is the Ohio River, and the southern boundaries of Kansas, Colorado, and Missouri.

The eastern boundary is Ohio/Pennsylvania.

The western boundary is where the Great Plains end and the Rocky Mountains start.
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:16 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,146,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVaz1009 View Post
In my opinion:

The southern boundary of the Midwest is the Ohio River, and the southern boundaries of Kansas, Colorado, and Missouri.

The eastern boundary is Ohio/Pennsylvania.

The western boundary is where the Great Plains end and the Rocky Mountains start.
Only thing I would quibble about here is that this seems to include New Mexico as part of the South (which it isn't). And I would add the Potomic River as well as a boundary. Otherwise, great general definition!

Last edited by TexasReb; 07-23-2010 at 12:31 AM..
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Old 07-23-2010, 04:33 PM
 
Location: IN
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Actually parts of southern Indiana are quite southern in culture. The built environment and job types are very Midwestern, though. So, a mixed hybrid with an identity crisis.
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Old 07-23-2010, 05:20 PM
 
5,861 posts, read 14,075,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Cann View Post
I know somebody from Williston, ND that has lived here for about 6 years. A new guy to work started and he is from Grand Forks, ND. She constanly turns to me and says "The new guy is such a North Dakota boy, I love it!".

350 miles from each other. One on the west, one on the east and she can still notice it enough to be able to call him a 'North Dakota Boy'.

Same goes for Minnesota. Minnesotan's are big on state pride. We love Minnesota. Minnesotans are unique people. It's hard to explain without living here or have lived here or without knowing people that live here. People from Roseau still have that 'Minnesota thing' that a kid from Austin.
I know what you mean because I live here. But it is true in the other 4 states I've lived in, too.
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Old 07-23-2010, 05:56 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,082,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I know what you mean because I live here. But it is true in the other 4 states I've lived in, too.
That's true - I know Wisconsin has a LOT of pride in their state, as do all states. I don't think it's unique, to feel that your own state is "unique".
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Old 07-23-2010, 06:59 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,122,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVaz1009 View Post
In my opinion:

The southern boundary of the Midwest is the Ohio River, and the southern boundaries of Kansas, Colorado, and Missouri.

The eastern boundary is Ohio/Pennsylvania.

The western boundary is where the Great Plains end and the Rocky Mountains start.
I am not too keen on using political boundaries as the basis for a region since they were arbitrarily formed.
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Old 07-23-2010, 07:50 PM
 
Location: The City
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I still feel as though Pittsburgh is a hybrid, Apallachia, Midwestern and Northeastern. Not sure it totally fits in any one
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Old 07-23-2010, 09:00 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,150 posts, read 9,939,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I still feel as though Pittsburgh is a hybrid, Apallachia, Midwestern and Northeastern. Not sure it totally fits in any one
Very true. This is a great example of a border region.

There was nothing written in stone about Pennsylvania's boundaries. With the exception of the water boundaries of the Delaware River and Lake Erie, almost all of Pennsylvania's boundaries follow artificial lines that could easily have been different from the ones we have today.

Case in point, the Pittsburgh area. VIRGINIA actually claimed this area and much of the Ohio River valley during the 1700s and sent military expeditions (including a young George Washington) to try to claim it.

If you look at a map, West Virginia (part of Virginia until the 1860s) has a panhandle that ends slightly NORTH of Pittsburgh. There is no real reason that the PA-WV border ends where it is now, Pennsylvania could have ended further east just like Maryland does. Then the whole Pittsburgh area would have been part of Virginia and now West Virginia.
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Old 07-24-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Location: MINNESOTA
1,178 posts, read 2,363,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
I know what you mean because I live here. But it is true in the other 4 states I've lived in, too.
I've met people in other parts of the country and have told myself "That guy's from MN" only to find out a few minutes later that he actually is, and it's nothing to do with the accent, it's just the way you can tell....

I was at a Chicago White Sox game last year in Chicago, and we struck up a convo with some guys seated near us, I knew before I even spoke a word to them that they were Minnnesotans, you could just tell. Then, about 20 mintues into the conversation they confirmed that they were from the Twin Cities.
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Old 07-25-2010, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Fargo, ND
1,034 posts, read 1,095,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyVaz1009 View Post
In my opinion:

The southern boundary of the Midwest is the Ohio River, and the southern boundaries of Kansas, Colorado, and Missouri.

The eastern boundary is Ohio/Pennsylvania.

The western boundary is where the Great Plains end and the Rocky Mountains start.
I really think the Great Plains is its own region. It is really such a unique region of country being so barren yet in an odd way beautiful. The agriculture is really different from the core of the midwest and ranching also takes on more importance. Plus energy also becomes a major part of what is economically important.

It is really weird driving west from Fargo in the winter where it is -10 and there is three feet of snow on the ground and after 200-300 miles the snow is much more sparse and the temps can swing wildly.

Here is a solid map that outlines the Great Plains region.

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