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Old 07-17-2010, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Duluth MN
52 posts, read 87,367 times
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If you really wanted to simplify things, you could split the twelve midwest states into three categories along state lines:

Upper: Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Michigan (Midwest with a liberal/canadian tinge)
Lower: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri (Midwest with conservative/southern tinge)
Plains: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas (Midwest with a libertarian/western tinge)

You'll find more similiarities than not within those groupings of states.
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Old 07-17-2010, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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I would Iowa to Lower or Plains. They don't really have much in common with MI, WI, or MN, except politics.
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Old 07-17-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Duluth MN
52 posts, read 87,367 times
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Nah, Iowa is definitely upper Midwest. I don't see much difference between Madison, Grand Rapids, and Des Moines - they're all pretty similar and the rural areas around them are very similar as well. The extreme southern two rows of counties could be lower midwest but I was just catagorrizing states generally and the vast majority of Iowa is definitely upper Midwest. Iowa City is very similar to Ann Arbor. Rochester could be in Iowa and would not seem out of place at all. Politics is just one more reason to group them together.
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Old 07-17-2010, 03:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
I would Iowa to Lower or Plains. They don't really have much in common with MI, WI, or MN, except politics.
? I grew up there. I would say easily if you're anywhere except out in far western Iowa or down in southern Iowa the states with the closest bonds are Minnesota and Wisconsin. Similar politics, similar situation of small towns dotting everywhere, similar layout of the land, similar usage of the land, similar climate, similar heritage, similar priority given to local education systems.

It's certainly not plains, those states to the west are far far different in everything from the usage of the land, the lack of small towns everywhere, the politics, etc. The division for lower/upper Midwest tends to run along I-80. Places along I-80 are more upper, but once you get down south of there it's more Missiouri and southern. I would agree with the poster above who stated it's the bottom two rows of counties that you could group more with lower than upper. That's a good description.
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Old 07-17-2010, 04:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
Same with Omaha-Lincoln.. We are close to the edge of the Great Plains, but not in the Great plains.

The Great Plains begin just west of Lincoln. The city of Seward is in the Great Plains and is in the Lincoln MSA.
I am picturing the Kansas City-Omaha corridor as a specific subregion which likely has some other areas similar to it.

One aspect I am trying to think of in terms of boundaries is the presense of Evangelicals in an area. What are thoughts on how they play into boundaries.
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:35 PM
 
Location: IN
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Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
I am picturing the Kansas City-Omaha corridor as a specific subregion which likely has some other areas similar to it.

One aspect I am trying to think of in terms of boundaries is the presense of Evangelicals in an area. What are thoughts on how they play into boundaries.
If I recall, Missouri has a fairly substantial number of Evangelicals. Missouri is also not like the Midwest at all in terms of religion due to the fact that the rural areas are nearly all majority Baptist with the cities being more religiously diverse. Also, I think the Catholics in the lower Midwest tend to be quite a bit more evangelical than those in the upper Midwest.
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Old 07-17-2010, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Also, I think the Catholics in the lower Midwest tend to be quite a bit more evangelical than those in the upper Midwest.
As far as Catholics in East Missouri, that would be a resounding no.
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Old 07-17-2010, 07:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
As far as Catholics in East Missouri, that would be a resounding no.
You are right at least on the idea of being evangelical in nature which seems to me as a term for extroverted. Though I do think there is a difference between Lower Midwest Catholics and Great Lakes Catholics.
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Old 07-17-2010, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,440 posts, read 31,756,105 times
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Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
You are right at least on the idea of being evangelical in nature which seems to me as a term for extroverted. Though I do think there is a difference between Lower Midwest Catholics and Great Lakes Catholics.
I've noticed a great difference between Midwestern Catholics and Southern Catholics, also.
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Old 07-17-2010, 07:39 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,119,659 times
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Originally Posted by kshe95girl View Post
I've noticed a great difference between Midwestern Catholics and Southern Catholics, also.
From what I can tell the Southern Catholics tend to be more devout on average. I also noticed that Lower Midwest Catholics are a bit more devout and conservative than Great Lakes or Northeast Caholics as well. I am thinking it has to do with it being a transition zone. It also seems to be part of a general concept of religion being more important to people the further South you go along with it being more strongly associated with culture.
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