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Old 07-15-2010, 09:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Exactly and American history tells us this. For instance, the Republican party when it first started was more "liberal" and was anti-slavery. Southern Democrats(more like Dixiecrats) were against Civil Rights legislation due to essentially maintaining the Southern way of life. So, things aren't necessarily as static in terms of political affiliation and being "liberal" or "conservative".

NY is an interesting state, as many religiously based movements started there, eventhough the state has a history of being known as a "liberal" state. Mormonism, the Second Great Awakening and many Abolitionists came from NY(Upstate NY in particular). They have a base in faith/religion, but are viewed as being "liberal"in context of the times as well. Charles Grandison Finney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Joseph Smith, Jr. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York Manumission Society - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Also, keep in mind that NY had slavery until 1827 and is something people don't know about or talk about in regards to NY.
Genearlly in American history the two parties have a degree of resuffling every so often. Where one group goes from one party to another and platforms change. In the 1930's it was so drastic it changed which part would be seen as the more liberal one and which one is the more conservative one. I think the last real change is related to the events of the 1960's but it did take until the 90's to fully manifest itself in terms of party alignments. I am thinking though the next shakeup is arriving but am unsure as to what will end up happening. My guess is that it will be based on the declining power of the religious right and Evangelicals in particular. (could be that they become less united politically as well)
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Old 07-15-2010, 10:07 AM
 
766 posts, read 2,269,390 times
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It's hard to find entire states or even metro regions like this, but affluent suburban areas of liberal cities are usually where most socially liberal/fiscally conservative people (which is what I consider myself to be) are found. The Greenwich area outside of NYC, the North Shore suburbs of Chicago, Orange County by LA, Silicon Valley by SF and Northern Virginia by DC are all prominent examples. It makes sense when you think about it, as well. These are areas that have great exposure and proximity to the social life of liberal urban areas but have income levels where there's a self-interest to protect wealth and push for lower taxes.
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Old 07-15-2010, 12:17 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,756,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank the Tank View Post
It's hard to find entire states or even metro regions like this, but affluent suburban areas of liberal cities are usually where most socially liberal/fiscally conservative people (which is what I consider myself to be) are found. The Greenwich area outside of NYC, the North Shore suburbs of Chicago, Orange County by LA, Silicon Valley by SF and Northern Virginia by DC are all prominent examples. It makes sense when you think about it, as well. These are areas that have great exposure and proximity to the social life of liberal urban areas but have income levels where there's a self-interest to protect wealth and push for lower taxes.
I couldn't have said this better myself. I live in one of those areas too. I agree 100%.
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Old 07-15-2010, 01:43 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
128 posts, read 263,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
Good point but there are many socially conservative\ fiscally liberal Democrats in California. The people who voted against gay marriage but routinely elect the most far left representatives. Latino\ Afro-Americans fit this classification.
Just because someone opposes same-sex marriage doesn't mean they're socially conservative. While I know that majorities of blacks and latinos tend to oppose same sex marriage, they also tend to favor affirmative action, hate crime legislation, and seem split on abortion. All of the major black politicians I know of are pro-choice, though I can't say what is "typical" in the black community.

I think, getting past specific issues, the basic philosophical difference between social conservatives and social liberals closely resembles a difference in outlook on economic issues as well. Basically, social and economic conservatives believe that individuals "succeed" because of working hard and making moral and smart choices in their personal lives while people "fail" because they made poor or immoral decisions or didn't work hard enough, while liberals think that systemic societal factors are determinative in whether the individual "fails" or "succeeds." Under this analysis, most minorities would tend to be more socially liberal.
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Old 07-15-2010, 07:46 PM
 
Location: East Coast
678 posts, read 691,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN55 View Post
Definitely not Minnesota or Wisconsin. Outside Madison and a few neighborhoods in South Minneapolis, we're pretty much the exact opposite.
Milwaukee is definitely socially liberal.
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Old 07-15-2010, 10:09 PM
 
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^So is Minnesota, outside of a few areas (like Michelle Bachmann's district).. And of course for WI, Madison is certainly also socially liberal (although perhaps not fiscally conservative). Minneapolis is similarly very socially liberal, but not fiscally conservative.
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Old 07-15-2010, 10:11 PM
 
Location: San Leandro
4,576 posts, read 7,878,053 times
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orange county/san diego county, ca
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Old 07-15-2010, 10:11 PM
 
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Orange County and San Diego!
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Old 07-15-2010, 10:52 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,955,873 times
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Republicans in some respects grew out of the Whigs, in that many of the first Republicans had been Whigs. So they were industrial and merchant focused to some extent. The anti-slavery element fit into that some. So the pro-capitalist/pro-business element of the party is, arguably, fairly consistent or at least justifiable from the beginnings.

On religion they were somewhat varied at first. Some of the early Republicans were quite irreligious, but like much of the business community of that era some strongly valued "The Protestant ethic" so were what we might now call mainline Protestants. (Congregational, Methodist, Presbyterian, Disciples of Christ, Quakers, Anglican, etc) So there were moralistic elements of the Republican Party fairly early on, but they were concerned with specifically low-church/mainline Protestant issues like alcohol prohibition.

Starting in the late 1970s I would agree certain changes regarding religion/morality took place. The Republican Party, which once ran against "Rum and Romanism", began to more effectively court the Catholic vote. The other being the better known "Southern strategy" which appealed to "Southern conservatism" and white Baptist churches. A small variance on this is the Dutch Reformed Churches. Dutch Reformed areas (like Ottawa County, Michigan and Northwest Iowa) have went Republican in most elections from Ulysses S. Grant to present. Otherwise the Protestant denominations they used to get have largely defected and the social issues many of them deem moral issues are now seen as liberal. (Even in cases like opposition to the death penalty where you could state there is an established tradition for that in some states, etc)

At least initially the influx of Catholics and Southerners did not seem to effect their economic views much, or at all, but Bush's idea of "compassionate conservatism" was in some ways economically to the Left of much recent Republicanism. Hence some years under Bush you had a faction deemed "Big-government conservatism" represented by people like Gerson. Huckabee's ideas are often seen as such as well. However the failure of the Bush years seems to have basically canceled that element and the party is mostly moving economically back to the Right.
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:59 PM
 
361 posts, read 632,251 times
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Minnesota and Wisconsin NOT liberal?

Did I miss something here or just misread the question?
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