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Old 07-16-2010, 08:09 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
822 posts, read 1,256,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
"Appalachian accent?" Do parts of PA really have a Southern accent? I've never really thought of PA as the South (except extreme SW PA), but it is at the same latitude as Ohio and Missouri, so maybe it does have Southern influence.
Appalachian accent does not always mean southern.

The area has a Northern Appalachian accent. No one would confuse it with Kentucky or Tennessee, but the Appalachian influences are there.

Also nearby Wheeling and Weirton, WV, are not southern cities. Might as well throw Morgantown, Parkersburg, and Clarksburg in there too.

Cultural areas do not abruptly stop at state lines.
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Old 07-16-2010, 08:15 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
822 posts, read 1,256,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post


Think Mr. Rogers saying "No". A little southern influence, but we were always proud to be northerners.



.
I am glad you mentioned Mr. Rogers (Fred Rogers). Although from Greensburg, PA, his accent is a perfect example of a Pittsburgh region accent.
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Old 07-16-2010, 11:12 AM
 
2,758 posts, read 4,928,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallydude02 View Post
Appalachian accent does not always mean southern.

The area has a Northern Appalachian accent. No one would confuse it with Kentucky or Tennessee, but the Appalachian influences are there.

Also nearby Wheeling and Weirton, WV, are not southern cities. Might as well throw Morgantown, Parkersburg, and Clarksburg in there too.

Cultural areas do not abruptly stop at state lines.
I'm agreeing with on here. I'm not trying to imply anything but sometimes PA folks can sound slightly like some folks south of the Mason Dixon line. I forgot the poster who brought it out but both areas had a lot of Scotch-Irish people and that could be where the similarities come from; the Northern Appalachian use Yinz and the Southern Appalachia is home of Yunz (I cringe everytime I hear that word). I remember going to school with some folks from the Philly metro (blacks and whites) and they always sounded like they were saying y'all like the natives down here but they told me they were saying you all. To be honest, outside of the way some Philly folk say coffee (a "w" after the c), I really don't hear much of an accent from them (some do sound like NNJ natives though). I worked with a guy from Harrisburg, PA and I assumed he was from this area but he was only here for two years and his dialect just didn't jump out and that's where the confusion comes into play at.
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Old 07-16-2010, 05:25 PM
 
Location: New England & The Maritimes
2,116 posts, read 4,208,625 times
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Fairly good map. I think the NY/New England line in CT is spot on. Fairfield and New Haven countys to NY the rest New England.

I think you're french line is off though. Although that part of Maine has more francophones than most of the US, it is still only a small bit of the population. Much MUCH more of NB should be francophone, all the way down the coast to Moncton, which should be on the line.

Verseau- awesome post. Although New England's different regions still don't take away from a common culture throughout the area.
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Old 07-16-2010, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Springfield and brookline MA
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i live in western mass and the dropped "r" is commonly spoken in the Springfield area.but the area is more closely tied to the hartford area than the rest of mass.
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Old 07-16-2010, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,321 posts, read 2,750,596 times
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Here is a map of regional speech within the northeast as determined by the Univ of PA Telsur Project

New England Regional Map

And here is the text page with maps for the US.

National Map
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Old 07-16-2010, 07:04 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,991,900 times
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Looks like none of Pennsylvania is in the South, according to this map.
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Old 07-16-2010, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
3,359 posts, read 10,923,408 times
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All of New York State should be included including Rochester and Buffalo.

I would separate NYS which has a strong Irish/English/French/Italian w pockets of Native Americans from PA which has a strong German heritage.

The Hudson River area in NYS from Albany down to NYC and over towards NE PA also has a noticeable Dutch influence.

My friend who was brought up in Pittsburg and often used the term "you'ins" sounded completely out of place in upstate NY.

Plus you forgot to mention that New England is home to the Congregational denomination.
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Old 07-30-2010, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
257 posts, read 532,416 times
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Branford and Guilford CT should be part of the New England region. Pretty much from New Haven and eastward is "New Englandish" vs the NYC metro area.
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:54 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,203,308 times
Reputation: 16839
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Some of those counties in extreme northern Maine are French speaking areas like Quebec. He was correct to do that
He only dropped a portion of one county (Aroostook County) which would be correct. While there are French influences all along the Western side of Maine, the heaviest is in the northern portion of Aroostook County from about the Caribou area north. The Counties in Northern Maine are really big. Aroostook County alone is bigger than some of the states in New England at 6,671 square miles.
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