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Old 08-03-2010, 11:04 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
821 posts, read 1,255,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5Lakes View Post
Ashtabula, Trumbull, and Mahoning counties do not have it. People in those counties do indeed talk like folks from PA, even though they are largely influenced by the Cleveland media. Heck, I know people from Youngstown who straight up sound like they are from Pittsburgh.

I actually used to live in Akron and I really didn't hear it all that strongly there either, although some people did have it. Then again I also came across people in Akron who sounded Appalachian since it had a large influx of people from West Virginia (that accent was more common in the east and south working class parts of Akron).

Going west from PA I think the NCVS really kicks in around Lake, Geauga, and the northern part of Summit County. These areas are where suburban Cleveland clearly takes hold. I assume it must be similar going northeast from PA into NY once you start getting into suburban Buffalo. I would guess that people in Jamestown and Dunkirk do not have it.
Some relatives on my father's side of the family moved to Akron in the 1950's to work in the plants. They moved from rural southwest PA, about 50 miles south of Pittsburgh.

From stories I am told, I know they received comments on their accents alot there. I grew up in North-Central WVa, which has a similiar dialect to SW Penna. I guess to Akron ears, it sounds kind of hillbilly. Growing up in WV, I always thought the more Appalachian accents were in the southern parts.

Even when I travel outside of this region today, my accent is commented on. Depending on the location, I either sound southern (in the northern states) or northern (in the southern states).
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Old 08-03-2010, 11:54 AM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,057,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K.O.N.Y View Post
Na black people in the northeast sound as different to blacks from the south in the same way with white people. Maybe more so even.
Not according to this article: New York dialect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It says that blacks in NYC largely speak the same dialect as southern blacks. I've wondered why Northern blacks who have been up here more than a generation continue to speak with the Southern dialect. I'm guessing it has to do with the fact of where the family learned to speak English. For blacks, it was the South. For white Euro-Americans, it was wherever they settled in the US upon immigration. That's why you hear Midwestern Jews speaking in the local dialect and Southern Jews speaking in Southern dialect, Midwestern Chinese speaking in Midwestern dialect, Poles in Boston speaking the Boston dialect, etc.
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Old 08-03-2010, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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I've never heard a black person from New York sound Southern. All of them that I've heard have a heavy New York accent.

Don't believe everything you read on Wikipedia.
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Old 08-03-2010, 12:46 PM
Led
 
Location: Astoria, Queens
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So Nova Scotia has nothing to do with Maine or NE? If that's what I understand from the map.
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Old 08-03-2010, 12:48 PM
Led
 
Location: Astoria, Queens
146 posts, read 377,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
I've never heard a black person from New York sound Southern. All of them that I've heard have a heavy New York accent.

Don't believe everything you read on Wikipedia.
You've obviously never been to New York then, there's definitely a NY accent influence, but it's a blend with the southern drawl.

It's funny beause blacks from the MW sound more southern than blacks from the south, LOL. The aftereffects of segregation I guess.
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Old 08-03-2010, 12:52 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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A few things:

1) Not all African-Americans speak AAVE (the dialect based on Southern English). Many black people sound no different from the white people in the city where they live, and many have a blend of features from both dialects.

2) AAVE shows more geographic homogeneity than most other American English dialects; in other words, if a black person from Detroit has an AAVE dialect, then their accent will be much more similar to that of an AAVE speaker from Atlanta, compared to the tremendous dialectal differences between the traditional white dialects of Detroit and Atlanta.

3) Even if a speaker uses many AAVE features, he may still show regional accent features as well. It is fairly easy for me to pick out an AAVE speaker who grew up in New York City from one who grew up elsewhere.

For more information: African American Vernacular English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-03-2010, 02:03 PM
 
56,674 posts, read 80,973,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
I've never heard a black person from New York sound Southern. All of them that I've heard have a heavy New York accent.

Don't believe everything you read on Wikipedia.
Not true, as my mother has lived in Syracuse for about 45 years now and her accent hasn't changed from the days when she grew up in SC. I've heard from Black folks from NYC that Black people in Upstate NY sound "country". On the other hand, when I was in college, many of the Black folks there thought I was from Queens by the way I would talk.
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Old 08-03-2010, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,571,893 times
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Interesting . . . no I've never been to NYC. Of course people raised in the South will sound Southern. I was talking about native New Yorkers.

Led, if by "MW" you mean Chicago, then yes, that is true. Blacks from Minnesota (especially the Outstate) don't sound Southern (unless they moved here from away).

Also, Verseau raises a good point about not all blacks speaking AAVE. Highly educated blacks and those from predominately white areas usually sound indistinguishable from whites.
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Old 08-03-2010, 04:03 PM
 
56,674 posts, read 80,973,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Interesting . . . no I've never been to NYC. Of course people raised in the South will sound Southern. I was talking about native New Yorkers.

Led, if by "MW" you mean Chicago, then yes, that is true. Blacks from Minnesota (especially the Outstate) don't sound Southern (unless they moved here from away).

Also, Verseau raises a good point about not all blacks speaking AAVE. Highly educated blacks and those from predominately white areas usually sound indistinguishable from whites.
That last sentence depends. There are many educated Blacks that speak proper English, but with a "Black" dialect.

Even for those that grow up in overwhelmingly White communities can vary due to roots in terms of length and if they live in a certain type of neighborhood. Meaning, one could live in an area of a mostly White community that has a high concentration of Blacks. You see this in many places in Upstate NY like SW Auburn, Elmira's East Side, Corning's South Side and Ithaca's inner North and South Sides, for example. You probably see this in MI even in communities like Three Rivers and Niles, as both are about 10-12% Black.
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Old 08-03-2010, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,571,893 times
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Quote:
That last sentence depends. There are many educated Blacks that speak proper English, but with a "Black" dialect.
That's not AAVE, though. AAVE is by definition nonstandard English with nonstandard grammar.


Three Rivers and Niles are pretty integrated, and the dialect thing varies mostly along educational and socioeconomic lines (among blacks). I mentioned Greater Minnesota because most towns are less than 2% black (but most do have some black population).
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