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Old 08-04-2010, 10:53 AM
 
Location: where my heart is
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With this, you could even argue that part of northern NY also borders Canada. Why not lump that with Canada too? Closer to there than the Midwest.
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Old 08-04-2010, 11:50 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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^ While obviously we are talking about two separate countries, it would be interesting to see if Canadians feel any similarities to the Northeast or Midwest.

The Rabbit mentioned the Maritimes and New England having some similarities. I can see this, especially Maine.

But what about Quebec and Ontario? Both the big populated Canadian provinces border on my state. How do Canadians relate to New York or nearby Pennsylvania?
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Old 08-04-2010, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
I've never heard a black person from New York sound Southern. All of them that I've heard have a heavy New York accent.

Don't believe everything you read on Wikipedia.
It's not accent, I think it's more the words and sentence structure. I don't think people read the article but I find it to be aligned with my experiences.
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:30 PM
 
Location: EPWV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Didn't you meet any from Upstate? Even the white people up there don't have a "New York" accent.
So true. It all depends on where you spent the majority of your youth. It's much easier to pick up on various accents and tonal inflections as a child. They seem to soak that up like a sponge. I'm not saying adults don't but we pick up more on words and sayings, than how it's pronounced. Have you ever spent a few weeks with someone from another area, only to haphazardly throw out some word in conversation with your family and they're like, "where did that word come from?" Even different parts of PA., say things differently [I think there's a thread about that somewhere on C-D ].

I went to school in upstate NY and had several friends who were black and there was no southern accent, [or NYC speak] unless they had just moved from there. Give 'em [ones who moved up from the south] a few years and in time, you'll notice similar speech patterns. However, I can see if their parents and older siblings have a strong southern accent, that the youngster may or may not pick it up, or it'll just take a little longer.

I've noticed a distinct tonal inflection from people who live in the Reading, PA area compared to those, myself included, from the upstate NY area. My friends in PA were saying that I had the accent, when I was thinking that it was them with the accent.

When I lived in Maryland, I remember one of the doctors asking me where I came from originally. When I said, New York, the reply was - "how come you don't have that New Yawrk accent"? So, I pretty much say upstate from now on. Sometimes I slip up and leave it off.

I think the people in the Maryland area, have a unique way of speaking as in comparison to the people in the WV area.
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Old 08-04-2010, 04:29 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,057,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
With this, you could even argue that part of northern NY also borders Canada. Why not lump that with Canada too? Closer to there than the Midwest.
Exactly! As I asked earlier, is Buffalo really that much less "Northeastern" than Quebec City and Montreal are northeastern? I'd argue Buffalo is more northeastern, though the map puts QC and Montreal in the NE but not Buffalo! I think if you asked Quebecois if they were NE'n, they'd say non!, but if you asked a Buffalonian, they'd say damn straight!

This is the map's biggest flaw, IMO.
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Old 08-04-2010, 05:34 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
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Default I was in Lake Placid last February

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Exactly! As I asked earlier, is Buffalo really that much less "Northeastern" than Quebec City and Montreal are northeastern? I'd argue Buffalo is more northeastern, though the map puts QC and Montreal in the NE but not Buffalo! I think if you asked Quebecois if they were NE'n, they'd say non!, but if you asked a Buffalonian, they'd say damn straight!

This is the map's biggest flaw, IMO.
at lot of the road signs, etc., were in French up there. There is probably more of a French Canadian influence up there than certainly Midwestern.
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Old 08-05-2010, 12:37 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
I've never heard a black person from New York sound Southern. All of them that I've heard have a heavy New York accent.

Don't believe everything you read on Wikipedia.
…well then you haven’t talked to many black people in the NYC Tri-State area. You obviously know little about historical demographics in the United States.

Some of the oldest African American communities on the USA mainland are located in the Tri-State area like Newhallville in New Haven (Connecticut) and Harlem (NYC). These locations are filled with people who came from the low Country of Georgia/South Carolina (Savannah, Charleston, the coastal Islands …etc) over the last 75 – 100 years. To this day, many of the African Americans in the NYC/NJ/Connecticut area still have family and roots to the Gullahs in South Carolina and other old African American communities in the southeastern United States. Many of the African American families that I know around New Haven, Connecticut still go down to the tidewater area of Virginia or the outlaying areas of the Sea islands in Georgia and South Carolina for holidays.

Don’t believe everything you see on late night TV shows either.
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Old 08-05-2010, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Blacks in NYC have some southern sayings/slang but they dont have a southern dialect.

SN: Many NYers are very dramatic to me when they talk. They over pronounce words and put too much stress on a lot of the syllables.

edit: But then again now that I think about it, I guess its cool to be country/southern now because I hear many younger black NY'ers trying to stretch the vowels out when they talk to sound more southern where as back in the day, people use to try and sound extra New York-ish like how Italians talk or something
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Old 08-05-2010, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
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cmon Guilford, CT and Branford, CT should be out of NYC metro area! lol
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Old 08-06-2010, 03:34 PM
 
56,687 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
…well then you haven’t talked to many black people in the NYC Tri-State area. You obviously know little about historical demographics in the United States.

Some of the oldest African American communities on the USA mainland are located in the Tri-State area like Newhallville in New Haven (Connecticut) and Harlem (NYC). These locations are filled with people who came from the low Country of Georgia/South Carolina (Savannah, Charleston, the coastal Islands …etc) over the last 75 – 100 years. To this day, many of the African Americans in the NYC/NJ/Connecticut area still have family and roots to the Gullahs in South Carolina and other old African American communities in the southeastern United States. Many of the African American families that I know around New Haven, Connecticut still go down to the tidewater area of Virginia or the outlaying areas of the Sea islands in Georgia and South Carolina for holidays.

Don’t believe everything you see on late night TV shows either.
Very true....The Syracuse area has Black folks with roots in the Pee Dee area of SC. Along with my mother's hometown(Mullins), I've met people from other communities in that area like Lake City, Andrews, Georgetown, Bennettsville, Dillon and Florence. Quite few folks with roots in southern Georgia, SE Alabama, Southern VA, Central FL and SE NC too.
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