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Old 01-09-2012, 12:09 PM
 
1,495 posts, read 1,947,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
They aren't "Northerners" the way people on the East Coast think of the term.
Yeah, the "North"/"Northerners" are pretty meaningless references, except to Southerners and geography geeks.
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Old 01-09-2012, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Midwesterns are Midwesterners. They aren't "Northerners" the way people on the East Coast think of the term.
I just don't get that. The Midwest and the northeast are "the north".

They were together as the Union in the civil war, and they are both north of the south. They are the north.
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Old 01-09-2012, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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That's the South Philly Italian. Most people in the Philadelphia area don't have accents that thick. The classic South Philly Italian accent is almost Non-Rhotic and doesn't represent the entire region.

Another thing, just because Washington DC doesn't have a Philly accent doesn't mean it isn't part of the Northeast. New York and Boston both have their own kinds of dialects and so does DC but what makes them in common is that they all represent the different dialects that make of the Northeast Region. No where else in the country to you get so many different accents in such a small area.
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Old 01-09-2012, 08:20 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,412 posts, read 7,710,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
^ Many Midwesterners dont have a Northeastern accent, but they're still Northern. They're definitely not Southern. DC has a lack of an accent because so many people move there from various places.
This is true.
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Old 01-09-2012, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
1,154 posts, read 3,965,311 times
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Baltimore and St Louis are not 'northern' per se; they are border cities that have somewhat more in common with the north. DC on the other hand is far more complicated, being an international city with a ton of transplants from the Northeast and everywhere else.

Personally though I consider everything below Baltimore, Cincinnati, and St Louis to be southern or at least southern-leaning.
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Old 01-10-2012, 01:52 AM
 
Location: US
743 posts, read 567,237 times
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Problem with this is...
The definition is blurred through the us.
Someone asked where I lived on the net and I said the south, they said "Me too!" I asked, "Where so?"
Their reply..."California."
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Old 01-10-2012, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,229,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYMTman View Post
Baltimore and St Louis are not 'northern' per se; they are border cities that have somewhat more in common with the north. DC on the other hand is far more complicated, being an international city with a ton of transplants from the Northeast and everywhere else.

Personally though I consider everything below Baltimore, Cincinnati, and St Louis to be southern or at least southern-leaning.
SOMEWHAT more in common with the north...from a modern standpoint, these three cities are industrially, culturally, demographically, and in terms of speech patterns far more aligned with the north than the south. Washington may have a lot of people from all over, but it has long since ceased to have anything southern about it. about the only thing these cities lack is their geographic location, which is more central. I would classify St. Louis, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and D.C. all as the "southernmost northern cities." From a modern standpoint, there is little evidence to the contrary. One doesn't have to play mind riddles in order to figure out which way these cities lean DECISIVELY towards. Sure they have southern influences, but not nearly enough to cause one to question what region of the country they are in. The northernmost southern cities are Paducah, Louisville, Lexington, Richmond, Huntington, Charleston, etc. In between the northernmost southern cities and southernmost northern cities lies the transition zone...in this area you can get southern-leaning, northern-leaning, but you can't really get a conclusive picture. I would place this region just to the south of Highway 50 and just to the north of Highway 60, starting from Virginia all the way out to Kansas and Oklahoma.

Last edited by stlouisan; 01-10-2012 at 02:00 PM..
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Old 01-10-2012, 05:24 PM
 
Location: South St Louis
3,794 posts, read 3,455,649 times
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Lots of the cities being mentioned in this thread are located at the crossroads of different regions, and can therefore be considered as belonging to more than one area. They have cultural influences from multiple regions. My city, St. Louis, is a prime example. We are influenced by the north, south, east AND west. So it's fair to call STL a "Southern city"-- because it is, in part.
But if we're only searching for the northernmost city that is COMPLETELY Southern, that title might go to some place like Richmond.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Suffolk, Virginia
16 posts, read 101,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chocolattie View Post
Your points really mean nothing. No VA is not 100% southern. Richmond could be passed off as southern but the area around DC is not southern. Richmond looks like Baltimore. I think VA as a state is too up north and should be put in the mid atlantic. Puerto Rican Italians populations really mean nothing. People up there love their bagels and pizza and that is northeastern. Had roommates in college who were from VA and they sounded like Brooklyn kids and called us "country".

And no MD is not technically in the south. The south starts going east from north carolina tenneesee and arkansas. The "mason dixon line" is very outdated and means nothing and never was meant to be a boundary between north and south. Historically MD could have been "southern" but today MD is NOT southern. VA is losing it's southern card as well if it even ever had one. VA beach reminds me of Ocean City and look like an east coast beachtown. I think if anything the mason dixon line should start around richmond, but for me I can safely say that I am in the south when I see the NC welcome sign when I drive down i-95.
You can't base Virginia's southern qualities on northern Virginia and Virginia Beach. Both areas have large populations of national/international transplants. I know what you're saying about these areas, but they haven't fully lost their Southern qualities. "VA is losing it's southern card as well if it even ever had one." Are you seriously that naive? Every state in the South is losing/ has lost its southern characteristics in some areas. Atlanta and Birmingham do not feel strongly southern to me, but just like VA Beach you will find people who have stronger southern accents. For example, I'm from Suffolk and I went to a store in northern Suffolk. They asked me where I was from and I told them Suffolk; they thought I was from somewhere in the Deep South. The southern half of Virginia is very much Southern. Most NATIVE Virginians are very proud of their Southern heritage and will be offended by someone making generalizations based on only a small percentage of the population.
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:22 PM
 
976 posts, read 1,880,508 times
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st. louis is a northern industrial city that has much more in common with chicago, detroit, cleveland, milwaukee, etc. than with memphis, little rock, nashville, atlanta, etc. it happens to be located in what has historically been considered a border state, but the city and its suburbs are decidedly northern and eastern in orientation and always have been.
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