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Old 03-08-2013, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Also, keep in mind that Southern MD, and the Eastern Shore have a different history than the Baltimore area. Baltimore was a very "white" city before the Great Migration. Before that, it was very Irish and to a lesser extent, Italian. During slavery, there were far more Free Blacks than enslaved.
I've always been of the view that Baltimore is much more "northern" than DC. It's like a southern version of Philadelphia. And I think it's interesting that not that long ago residents considered it a southern city. I remember watching an interview of Reginald Lewis and he says, "Well, I'm just a southern boy from Baltimore." In his biography, "Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun," I believe one of the chapters is titled "A Southern Boy from Baltimore." The chapter then goes on to give a description of the city Lewis grew up in.
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:57 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,746 posts, read 6,152,030 times
Reputation: 3598
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I've always been of the view that Baltimore is much more "northern" than DC. It's like a southern version of Philadelphia. And I think it's interesting that not that long ago residents considered it a southern city. I remember watching an interview of Reginald Lewis and he says, "Well, I'm just a southern boy from Baltimore." In his biography, "Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun," I believe one of the chapters is titled "A Southern Boy from Baltimore." The chapter then goes on to give a description of the city Lewis grew up in.
Lol. I've never heard anyone claim being southern here. That's just from my personal experience. Did he look high when he said it?
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Lol. I've never heard anyone claim being southern here. That's just from my personal experience. Did he look high when he said it?
That's because you're, what, in your 20s or 30s? Reg Lewis was born in 1942 and grew up in the Baltimore of the 1950s and 60s. It's not surprising to me that a Baltimorean of his generation would consider himself a southerner.
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:12 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,746 posts, read 6,152,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
That's because you're, what, in your 20s or 30s? Reg Lewis was born in 1942 and grew up in the Baltimore of the 1950s and 60s. It's not surprising to me that a Baltimorean of his generation would consider himself a southerner.
Sorry, I thought that you were talking about the basketball player. I'm in my 20's BTW.
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Sorry, I thought that you were talking about the basketball player. I'm in my 20's BTW.
No, I was talking about Reg Lewis the billionaire.

Reginald Lewis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Memorial Tribute to Reginald Lewis - YouTube
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Old 03-08-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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It would also be interesting to compare segregation in Baltimore to segregation in Philadelphia, NYC and Boston. People today tend to think of segregation as people being apart from each other. My dad, however, thinks of segregation as someone telling him "Get to the back of the bus" or "No, you can't eat here." The "segregation" we most commonly think of (as it relates to the American South) is the one that denied blacks access to public accommodations and divided whites and blacks on public and private transportation.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 03-08-2013 at 09:48 AM..
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Old 03-08-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
562 posts, read 541,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It would also be interesting to compare segregation in Baltimore to segregation in Philadelphia, NYC and Boston. People today tend to think of segregation as people being apart from each other. My dad, however, thinks of segregation as someone telling him "Get to the back of the bus" or "No, you can't eat here." The "segregation" we most commonly think of (as it relates to the American South) is the one that denied blacks access to public accommodations and divided whites and blacks on public and private transportation.
This is a really interesting topic. Have you heard of the movie, "Liberty Heights" (1999)? Liberty Heights - Rotten Tomatoes Although it's kind of a coming of age type film, I think it's pretty well-done, and explores this very issue from the perspective of the Liberty Heights community in Baltimore in 1954. At that time, Baltimore really was at the crossroads of the North and South, having concrete elements of both, from the settled and established immigrant communities, to Jim Crow style segregation, and the introduction of integration, the whole nine yards.

Of course, Baltimore and DC feel much more solidly NE than anything else today, imho. For Northernmost Southern, maybe...Louisville (where southern meets North and Midwest), Richmond (where North meets southern East Coast). Anyone whose been to Charleston, WV might feel weirdly like they're in a southern Appalachia version of Pittsburgh, but then again Pittsburgh is a very interesting place as well. Hmm..maybe the entire I-64 corridor?
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Probably the northernmost southern cities will most likely be found in the lower Shenandoah Valley in VA/WV.
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,230,797 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I've always been of the view that Baltimore is much more "northern" than DC. It's like a southern version of Philadelphia. And I think it's interesting that not that long ago residents considered it a southern city. I remember watching an interview of Reginald Lewis and he says, "Well, I'm just a southern boy from Baltimore." In his biography, "Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun," I believe one of the chapters is titled "A Southern Boy from Baltimore." The chapter then goes on to give a description of the city Lewis grew up in.
I'm sorry, but Baltimore is not the South. Neither is DC. If you honestly believe that, I feel sorry for you. Baltimore, just to barely even scratch the surface, is nothing like Philadelphia in terms of size.

Baltimore and D.C. from a modern standpoint have about twice as much in common with Philadelphia as opposed to Richmond. Culturally, lingustically, and demographically.
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,230,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYMTman View Post
Baltimore and St Louis are not 'northern' per se; they are border cities that have somewhat more in common with the north. DC on the other hand is far more complicated, being an international city with a ton of transplants from the Northeast and everywhere else.

Personally though I consider everything below Baltimore, Cincinnati, and St Louis to be southern or at least southern-leaning.
Somewhat more in common with the north? Try a LOT more in common. And since they have more in common with the north, why call them border cities? "Border" should be a term reserved for those cities with split and unclear identities. That does not characterize St. Louis or Baltimore. And anything south of these cities is not definitively southern or southern-leaning. There are transition zones that comprise roughly 100 miles from north to south that start below these cities. It doesn't go to definitively southern once you get below these cities, because there's really nothing southern about them to begin with.
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