U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-05-2007, 07:32 AM
 
Location: IN
20,848 posts, read 35,952,730 times
Reputation: 13292

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Now I agree, apologize if I'm coming across as hostile, not intending to be that way at all. I agree well over 50% for the most part with what you say, I just wanted to clear up what I meant earlier...I hope that you understand that.
Not a problem I like these kind of debates about Missouri. I just have to be very careful about the way I word things with some of my responses
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-05-2007, 01:23 PM
 
52 posts, read 112,902 times
Reputation: 36
I think the state of Missouri can be either Midwestern or Southern depending how you look at it. KC does not come off southern to me at all. Saint Louis has a mixture of both in my opinion. Springfield is definitely southern. The rest of the state I believe is a mixture and every region is different. My family is originally from the Little Dixie region of the state which is in the Northeastern/North-central region of the state before relocating to Saint Louis even though I still have a few relatives there and that area definitely has southern characteristics. It is hard to deny the southern heritage of Missouri. I have a question for those who do not believe this state has southern characteristics (charm, heritage, etc.) What separates Missouri from conventional southern states? I am curious, because I have been all over the south and I see similarities and I am Show Me State Bred so I wanna know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Richmond
1,489 posts, read 8,124,053 times
Reputation: 698
Its very easy.

Draw a line from Baltimore through Cincinati to St Louis. Anything below that will be the northern/southern city line.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 03:11 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by vasinger View Post
Its very easy.

Draw a line from Baltimore through Cincinati to St Louis. Anything below that will be the northern/southern city line.
Doesn't it make more sense to just use the MAson-Dixon line? I don't see anything Southern about St. Louis today...nothing. It has every characteristic of a Midwestern city. The only thing it has in common with Louisville is that St. Louis is a river city, and last time I checked that did not make a city Southern. It is overwhelmingly Catholic, it's political views resemble that of a Midwestern city, its weather is not uncommon to the Lower Midwest, dialect is Midwestern, etc. I think that the first Southern city/town below St. Louis is either Cape Girardeau or Sikeston, Missouri. The Mason-Dixon line (Ohio River, line across extreme Southern Missouri except for where it is along the Maryland-Pennsylvania border I think tells the general truth. With Pennsylvania and Maryland, I think the Maryland-Virginia border should be considered the real Mason-Dixon line.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 03:14 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by $how Me $tate Bred View Post
I think the state of Missouri can be either Midwestern or Southern depending how you look at it. KC does not come off southern to me at all. Saint Louis has a mixture of both in my opinion. Springfield is definitely southern. The rest of the state I believe is a mixture and every region is different. My family is originally from the Little Dixie region of the state which is in the Northeastern/North-central region of the state before relocating to Saint Louis even though I still have a few relatives there and that area definitely has southern characteristics. It is hard to deny the southern heritage of Missouri. I have a question for those who do not believe this state has southern characteristics (charm, heritage, etc.) What separates Missouri from conventional southern states? I am curious, because I have been all over the south and I see similarities and I am Show Me State Bred so I wanna know.
What separates Missouri from other Southern states? Easy...it's weather, trees, landscape, culture, dialect, its behavior during the Great Migration (it gained in black population), agriculture, industry, demographics, just about everything I can think of except maybe its poverty in some of its rural areas, and it's religious demographics, which are a very close tie between Catholic and Southern Baptist. Southern Baptists are more prevalent in the Southern parts of Missouri, whereas the Northern half has few Southern Baptists. The poverty may be partially due to the fact that much of Southern Missouri is somewhat mountainous, thereby limiting farmland, and politics. Poverty aside, all the things i just brought up share far more commonalities to the Lower Midwest, which itself is not immune to some Southern influences. The Northern half of the state today is unquestionably Midwestern. I too have family historically from the Little Dixie region and to call them Southern would garner more than just an awkward glance from them. Compare Missouri to Illinois and Indiana and then compare it to Kentucky. If you ask me, most of Missouri is more similar to the former two than Kentucky, Arkansas, or Tennessee. Missouri like the rest of the Midwest has very heavy German influence, and German ancestry is the most prevalant. Kentucky, Arkansas, and Tennessee may have a few pockets of German influence but for the most part have ancestors from the U.K. or someplace other than Germany.
KEntucky I definitely know is dominated by English ancestry.

Last edited by ajf131; 07-05-2007 at 03:37 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Austin
4,102 posts, read 7,364,785 times
Reputation: 2124
Bridgeport, Connecticut: High crime and low educational attainment. Relatively ignorant population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 03:48 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by $how Me $tate Bred View Post
My family is originally from the Little Dixie region of the state which is in the Northeastern/North-central region of the state
Just curious, $how Me, where exactly is the Little Dixie region in the NE/N Central parts of MO? I've been to Kirksville and thought that the town and the campus of Truman State had a definite Southern look to them, and the town had a laid-back rural South-type vibe. Is Kirksville in Little Dixie?

When I lived in Iowa, I knew some people from the southern part of that state who called their region "Lapland", because it's where Missouri laps up into Iowa.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 03:54 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,049,839 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Appalachian does not equate with southern. SW Pennsylvania is considered part of Appalachia. It is not southern.
Just an aside, NE PA is also considered part of Appalachia, as is South-Central NY. Definitely not Southern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 04:10 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Just curious, $how Me, where exactly is the Little Dixie region in the NE/N Central parts of MO? I've been to Kirksville and thought that the town and the campus of Truman State had a definite Southern look to them, and the town had a laid-back rural South-type vibe. Is Kirksville in Little Dixie?

When I lived in Iowa, I knew some people from the southern part of that state who called their region "Lapland", because it's where Missouri laps up into Iowa.
Little Dixie is around Hannibal, Clarksville, Mexico, Booneville, etc. it is an area that was originally settled by Southerners but landscape-wise was always a part of the Midwest. Plus you had a bunch of Amish and Quakers who also moved there afterwards, not recently, like in the 1800s. Basically, it historically was once Southern but is by all means Midwestern today. You would never guess its history if you visited there today unless someone told you, like I'm doing now
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 04:15 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 6,904,816 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Just curious, $how Me, where exactly is the Little Dixie region in the NE/N Central parts of MO? I've been to Kirksville and thought that the town and the campus of Truman State had a definite Southern look to them, and the town had a laid-back rural South-type vibe. Is Kirksville in Little Dixie?

When I lived in Iowa, I knew some people from the southern part of that state who called their region "Lapland", because it's where Missouri laps up into Iowa.

I have tons of friends at Truman-state...they think it's relatively Midwestern and I agree. Southern compared to Iowa and Minnesota? maybe...Southern I'm not sure I agree. If you want a real Southern town in Missouri, go to Cape Girardeau or Sikeston...those towns definitely do not look like any parts of Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio in ANY shape or form. I think most rural towns generally are laid-back anywhere that you go. This is not to say they do not have some Southern influences, but they are not Southern themselves, they definitely seem Midwestern to me. Is it really that easy to generalize any region of the United States? No two states are EXACTLY alike. They may be similar, but all have their own feels and identities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top