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Old 06-23-2007, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Fly-over country.
1,765 posts, read 6,382,953 times
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because there's no official language in the US, and the airlines haven't bothered to make clear pronunciation of english a job requirement?

just guessing
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Old 06-23-2007, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Ohio
138 posts, read 891,174 times
Reputation: 190
That's a good question.

Another good question: Why does the University of Toledo hire people from Asian countries, to teach 80% of the classes in the math department ?

Advanced math is difficult enough, but they make it much more difficult, by having people teach it, who's english pronunciation is very poor. Students can barely understand what they're saying. This is a major problem on many college campuses.
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Old 06-23-2007, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,387 posts, read 7,771,254 times
Reputation: 3596
I was at Newark Airport a few weeks ago, waiting for my flight back to LA. It's one of those airports that has delays quite often just due to the large number of flights that airlines try to push out onto the runways at the same time. I was trying to hear the delay information for my flight. Turns out the person making the flight announcement had a real heavy authentic Jersey City accent. I picked up on the information with no problem, cause I lived in Jersey for many years and my ears tuned in right away. A bunch of California people standing around me didn't have a clue what was said.
There are so many local accents and ways to pronounce words in our "American" english, that it would be pretty difficult to have airlines make rules about who can and who can't make announcements on the public address system. Would the rules have to say "no southern accents", "no Texas drawl", "no New York / New Jersey accents", "no upper midwest scandinavian sounding accents" or "no down east Maine accents" or "no ethnic urban sounding accents". Would we have language police in the airport aisles?
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Old 06-23-2007, 05:18 PM
 
2,066 posts, read 4,419,649 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by recycled View Post
I was at Newark Airport a few weeks ago, waiting for my flight back to LA. It's one of those airports that has delays quite often just due to the large number of flights that airlines try to push out onto the runways at the same time. I was trying to hear the delay information for my flight. Turns out the person making the flight announcement had a real heavy authentic Jersey City accent. I picked up on the information with no problem, cause I lived in Jersey for many years and my ears tuned in right away. A bunch of California people standing around me didn't have a clue what was said.
There are so many local accents and ways to pronounce words in our "American" english, that it would be pretty difficult to have airlines make rules about who can and who can't make announcements on the public address system. Would the rules have to say "no southern accents", "no Texas drawl", "no New York / New Jersey accents", "no upper midwest scandinavian sounding accents" or "no down east Maine accents" or "no ethnic urban sounding accents". Would we have language police in the airport aisles?
The minor speech differences based upon what part of the country or what state an individual is from is not the problem. The problem is with individuals who cannot speak conversational English clearly. Now, I have traveled to many countries throughout the world and HAVE NEVER EVER, heard a Public Address Announcement at any Airport in Undiscernable French, Italian, German, Spanish or any other language. This sort of thing only happens in this country.
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Old 06-23-2007, 05:19 PM
 
2,066 posts, read 4,419,649 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by recycled View Post
I was at Newark Airport a few weeks ago, waiting for my flight back to LA. It's one of those airports that has delays quite often just due to the large number of flights that airlines try to push out onto the runways at the same time. I was trying to hear the delay information for my flight. Turns out the person making the flight announcement had a real heavy authentic Jersey City accent. I picked up on the information with no problem, cause I lived in Jersey for many years and my ears tuned in right away. A bunch of California people standing around me didn't have a clue what was said.
There are so many local accents and ways to pronounce words in our "American" english, that it would be pretty difficult to have airlines make rules about who can and who can't make announcements on the public address system. Would the rules have to say "no southern accents", "no Texas drawl", "no New York / New Jersey accents", "no upper midwest scandinavian sounding accents" or "no down east Maine accents" or "no ethnic urban sounding accents". Would we have language police in the airport aisles?
These minor speech differences based upon what part of the country or what state an individual is from is not the problem. The problem is with individuals who cannot speak conversational English clearly. Now, I have traveled to many countries throughout the world and HAVE NEVER EVER, heard a Public Address Announcement at any Airport in Undiscernable French, Italian, German, Spanish or any other language. This sort of thing only happens in this country.
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