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View Poll Results: what cities have big downtowns?
philadelphia 104 72.73%
los angeles 56 39.16%
honolulu 12 8.39%
tampa 1 0.70%
atlanta 55 38.46%
omaha 0 0%
milwaukee 8 5.59%
dallas 49 34.27%
miami 49 34.27%
memphis 3 2.10%
kansas city mo 13 9.09%
st. louis 25 17.48%
san antonio 6 4.20%
san francisco 91 63.64%
houston 61 42.66%
san diego 24 16.78%
buffalo 5 3.50%
st. paul 4 2.80%
cincinatti 19 13.29%
denver 37 25.87%
seattle 71 49.65%
cleveland 21 14.69%
boston 77 53.85%
pittsburg 35 24.48%
detroit 34 23.78%
phoenix 11 7.69%
nashville 10 6.99%
charlotte 15 10.49%
portland 16 11.19%
minneapolis 52 36.36%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 143. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-27-2010, 05:41 PM
 
Location: 304
5,093 posts, read 6,857,884 times
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Boston, San Fran, and Philly are my vote
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:52 PM
 
335 posts, read 564,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
Baltimore does have quite a large/built-up/populated downtown and should have been an option in this thread.
i should have. baltimore is among the largest.
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Old 10-02-2012, 11:24 PM
 
5 posts, read 4,872 times
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How are Buffalo, St. Paul, and Omaha on this list, but Baltimore, New Orleans, and Austin are not?
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Old 10-03-2012, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
3,133 posts, read 8,333,737 times
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Pittsburgh's downtown is only 10 blocks long and 5 or 6 blocks wide. Is that considered big?
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:53 PM
 
1,000 posts, read 1,502,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckzona View Post
Why is there a Saint Paul Option?? There could have been Baltimore, New Orleans, Columbus, Omaha, Tulsa, or Oklahoma City option instead of Saint Paul
How about all of those AND a Saint Paul option. Just because Minneapolis is right next to it doesnt make it a small downtown. It is still a major city, as it is a core city in a metro of 3.5 Million. It has a bigger downtown that Tulsa and Omaha.... and equal/comparible to Columbus and OKC. Not necessarily in height, but in size, yes.

This isn't a small downtown.
stock photo - St. Paul Skyline (Aerial)
Aerial Photographs of St. Paul, Minnesota

These (Omaha and Tulsa) are definitely smaller.
Google Image Result for http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-C2Jt-xR4Jpw/TfKbtKqo6AI/AAAAAAAAB1c/BEs1y735C6M/s1600/799px-OmahaNE_Aerial.jpg

Airphoto - Aerial Photo: Downtown Tulsa, US 64, Tulsa, Oklahoma
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
4,370 posts, read 5,141,532 times
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Downtown Atlanta isn't big, but of you combine it with midtown and Buckhead it can be. But Atlanta on the merits of downtown alone, its not big at all. Seattle has a fairly large and dense downtown, but don't have a midtown or uptown. When you leave downtown Seattle, the urban core disappears quite rapidly.


As a native Kansas Citian, downtown KC is very unimpressive. It's really empty, and its even smaller than Atlantas downtown area, which is saying a lot.
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Old 10-03-2012, 08:41 PM
 
1,000 posts, read 1,502,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
Downtown Atlanta isn't big, but of you combine it with midtown and Buckhead it can be. But Atlanta on the merits of downtown alone, its not big at all. Seattle has a fairly large and dense downtown, but don't have a midtown or uptown. When you leave downtown Seattle, the urban core disappears quite rapidly.


As a native Kansas Citian, downtown KC is very unimpressive. It's really empty, and its even smaller than Atlantas downtown area, which is saying a lot.
The thing about Atlanta is it changes from a downtown area right over to low density suburban looking neighborhoods. At least Seattle and KC are urban and dense. KC has a very historic downtown. Seattle has a large downtown. The urban core doesn't dissapear like Atlanta, where it completely vanishes.
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,367 posts, read 12,975,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DANNYY View Post
To me it's the size of the downtown by land mass. A lot of people go by population of residency, some go by population of work force, and others may go by attractions there.

I like the idea of it being big by land mass.

Here is what I value most in a downtown:
- Downtown with shopping (even though I hate shopping)
- Downtown with Public Transit
- Downtown with sports venues
- Downtown with parks
- Downtown with residences
- Downtown with restaurants
- Downtown with clubs
- Downtown with bars (most definitely has to be there)
- Downtown with grocery stores
- Downtown with theater district (another thing I like in downtown)
- Downtown with art galleries (Kind of a major hobby of mine)
- Downtown with music venues (House of Blues, etc...)
- Downtown with good roads & sidewalks
- Downtown with amazing architecture
- Downtown with plenty of height
- Downtown with other attractions

PS: I only voted for downtowns that match my exact list. Dallas needs to get some venues there.
Downtown Los Angeles has all of these and its pretty big. It is changing so dramatically I can barely keep up.
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Old 10-04-2012, 04:24 AM
 
29,893 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bslette View Post
The thing about Atlanta is it changes from a downtown area right over to low density suburban looking neighborhoods.
That's not completely true; right outside downtown Atlanta you have neighborhoods like Midtown (to the north), Castleberry Hill (to the west), Sweet Auburn/Old Fourth Ward (to the east), etc. For the most part, the areas that are low-density have had housing projects razed.
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Old 10-04-2012, 06:06 AM
 
1,000 posts, read 1,502,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
That's not completely true; right outside downtown Atlanta you have neighborhoods like Midtown (to the north), Castleberry Hill (to the west), Sweet Auburn/Old Fourth Ward (to the east), etc. For the most part, the areas that are low-density have had housing projects razed.
Yes, I suppose, but the dense neighborhoods don't extend very far.
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