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Old 07-22-2010, 04:51 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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I think there might be a rural/urban divide in this a little. I live in a more rural area and it's certainly not unusual to see people 18-30 at Mass.

That being said it does seem to be common for childless people 18-30 to leave religion. I didn't precisely do this, but I suppose in some ways I did. It's kind of a period when a person is trying to figure themselves out and differentiate themselves from their parents. (I'm speaking of Western-culture, as in Europe plus its former colonies, in some non-Western cultures this period in life means conforming to ones duties or traditions.) That's a "deep" way of saying it, for many young adults it just means rebellion and partying. Those things don't fit keeping to the faith of their fathers and or mothers.

A good percentage of these people end up returning to their faith or joining a new faith once they get married and have kids. So I think it would be generally unwise to change a religion because 20-somethings are bored by it. Although if married people with children, even if they are in their twenties, are uninterested that has more meaning.
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Old 07-22-2010, 05:35 PM
 
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Definitely. I blame it on two groups.

A) Radical Left teachers who are ardent Atheists and have no ethical problem with indoctrinating children with their views.

B) Those evangelical types who distort the true beauty of our Judeo-Christian teachings to make them sound hateful and ugly.

As people move further from God, their moral codes begin to deteriorate. Our moral fabric, like anything else must be maintained and doing so requires work and standards. Only our religious teachings provide us with the factory service manual for good living. There is no such work in the Atheist belief system that serves a similar purpose.

Atheists can be good moral people, but the Atheist system, or any system with no written moral code will naturally degrade over time. In physics they call this entropy.
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Old 07-22-2010, 05:44 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,378,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edub View Post
Definitely. I blame it on two groups.

A) Radical Left teachers who are ardent Atheists and have no ethical problem with indoctrinating children with their views.

B) Those evangelical types who distort the true beauty of our Judeo-Christian teachings to make them sound hateful and ugly.

As people move further from God, their moral codes begin to deteriorate. Our moral fabric, like anything else must be maintained and doing so requires work and standards. Only our religious teachings provide us with the factory service manual for good living. There is no such work in the Atheist belief system that serves a similar purpose.

Atheists can be good moral people, but the Atheist system, or any system with no written moral code will naturally degrade over time. In physics they call this entropy.
I completely disagree with that statement. I'm about as religious as a cat, yet I am a very moral and good natured person. Humans choose their actions, and for the most part know what they're doing. Religion might try to say they are the founders and keepers of decent moral human behavior - but just because they claim that as their truth doesn't make it fact.

I personally don't equate religious people as good people any more than I would non-religious with bad people. It's about who you are and who you want to be - not about what God you believe in. Frankly if you're only doing good things and helping people out because a book told you to or out of Catholic guilt that makes me worried. You should want to because it's the decent thing to do and you have compassion.
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Old 07-22-2010, 06:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I completely disagree with that statement. I'm about as religious as a cat, yet I am a very moral and good natured person. Humans choose their actions, and for the most part know what they're doing. Religion might try to say they are the founders and keepers of decent moral human behavior - but just because they claim that as their truth doesn't make it fact.

I personally don't equate religious people as good people any more than I would non-religious with bad people. It's about who you are and who you want to be - not about what God you believe in. Frankly if you're only doing good things and helping people out because a book told you to or out of Catholic guilt that makes me worried. You should want to because it's the decent thing to do and you have compassion.
I agree where individuals are concerned but not societies as a whole. Plus, you are, like it or not, a product of morality that ultimately was based in religion. It is possible for people to pass along great morality to generations to come, but the same doesn't hold for cultures in the larger picture. Their morality will always be subject to dilutorious factors and will inevitably degrade.

And by the way, the Jewish tradition has always held that people should act ethically because it is right and never for fear of punishment. However, one should live a good life for fear of bringing bad stuff upon themselves. That is just a matter of wisdom.

I don't expect you to see what I am saying. Everyone needs to experience their own epiphany and I can not spell yours out for you.
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Old 07-22-2010, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
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I believe the future of religion in America is what religion is in Europe. The established churches in Europe were once "state" churches meaning that government taxes supported these religious institutions. I understand that this practice is still maintained in some European countries. Great Britain is Anglican. The Scandavanian countries are Lutheran and most of the other European nations are Catholic. A citizen of a town is automatically included as a member of the local parish even if they don't ever go to church or even believe in God.

And hardly anybody goes to church in Europe so the only way these religious bodies can stay afloat is thru government taxes.

This, of-course, is not how religion is practiced in the U.S. but the number of young people who go to church or temple continues to plummet and will eventually be on par with Europe [under 20%]. In America young people who are educated don't believe in God for the most part. Or if they do believe in God they don't express it in a church or temple. Atheism is the future and the influence of Christianity\ Judaism\ Islam is losing ground every day.
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Old 07-22-2010, 06:36 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,570,477 times
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I'm 29, not religious, but have done volunteer work for several catholic sponsored charity funds. Somewhat of a catch 22 as they help out a lot in the community where other groups do not step up, or are not present at all. For people who are saying you can't have morals without the religion, that is entirely false. I have seen some extremely dogmatic, self-righteous people that aren't religious based, worse than many religious groups.

Last edited by grapico; 07-22-2010 at 06:45 PM..
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Old 07-22-2010, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,186 posts, read 10,302,043 times
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I'm 18, the majority of people I know, including me, consider them selves Christian but aren't overly religious, just believe in god, celebrate chirstmas, etc, etc. Nothing that controls our lives.. Then I know a few agnostics, atheists and overly religious people.
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Old 07-22-2010, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,524,079 times
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I was confirmed as a Catholic when I was 15, but I've pretty much abandoned religion, I'm 17 now. I identify as Agnostic, because personally, I believe that you just can't know for sure or not if some deity really exists up there.

A lot of my friends aren't religious, and even a lot of those that "are" are the "Christians" that never even go to church, haha.

I think as science becomes more prevalent in the world, and parents start letting kids develop their own beliefs, people are focusing more on logical explanations for the unexplainable, and focusing more on their daily lives than what may happen when they die.

Personally, I think it's wrong to raise a child in a religion. I know it seems like I'm exaggerating, but isn't that pretty much the definition of brainwashing?
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Long Beach
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Speaking as someone born in the mid-80's. I think that religious isn't the right term to use. With my generation it's more about faith.

It's personal and very contemplative. That it's not about going to church or temple, but it's reflecting on how to be a better person, to love and be loved to yourself and others. That can manifest itself in various forms, either through God or any number of channels. One gen-yer might call it 'serving God' but his best friend might say, 'serving humanity', and yet it's the same idea and concept.
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,186 posts, read 10,302,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmkcin View Post
Speaking as someone born in the mid-80's. I think that religious isn't the right term to use. With my generation it's more about faith.

It's personal and very contemplative. That it's not about going to church or temple, but it's reflecting on how to be a better person, to love and be loved to yourself and others. That can manifest itself in various forms, either through God or any number of channels. One gen-yer might call it 'serving God' but his best friend might say, 'serving humanity', and yet it's the same idea and concept.
I couldn't have said it any better my self, Great post
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