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Old 07-27-2010, 02:48 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,523 posts, read 17,750,904 times
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What the east coast lacks in tree size, it more than makes up for in diversity. For a project I once counted 35 species of trees in my backyard.

That said, the Redwood forests and the sequoias are magnificent.

The forests of the Rockies and further north along the coast are far more boring (think sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce)
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Old 07-27-2010, 03:45 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,581,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
What the east coast lacks in tree size, it more than makes up for in diversity. For a project I once counted 35 species of trees in my backyard.

That said, the Redwood forests and the sequoias are magnificent.

The forests of the Rockies and further north along the coast are far more boring (think sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce sitka spruce)
The Southern Appalachians have more vegetative diversity than any other temperate location on the planet.

Here in the suburbs of Atlanta, you can drive down the road and see at least ten types of naturally occurring deciduous trees within many properties. Added to that, we have Lobolly pines as well. Out west, it's mostly only one or two varieties of trees. In the mountains of Southern California, all you see are Ponderosa Pine, Cedar, and perhaps another pine species or two.
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Old 07-27-2010, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
705 posts, read 1,443,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
The Southern Appalachians have more vegetative diversity than any other temperate location on the planet.

Here in the suburbs of Atlanta, you can drive down the road and see at least ten types of naturally occurring deciduous trees within many properties. Added to that, we have Lobolly pines as well. Out west, it's mostly only one or two varieties of trees. In the mountains of Southern California, all you see are Ponderosa Pine, Cedar, and perhaps another pine species or two.
Do you have some sort of proof to support that claim?

" Out west, it's mostly only one or two varieties of trees."
Really?
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Old 07-27-2010, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 23,117,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgiafrog View Post
Betcha didn't know Georgia has more forest than California.....
Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed
I'd believe it.

Last edited by Yac; 08-20-2010 at 06:18 AM..
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Old 07-27-2010, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Oregon
1,458 posts, read 5,267,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
The Southern Appalachians have more vegetative diversity than any other temperate location on the planet.

Here in the suburbs of Atlanta, you can drive down the road and see at least ten types of naturally occurring deciduous trees within many properties. Added to that, we have Lobolly pines as well. Out west, it's mostly only one or two varieties of trees. In the mountains of Southern California, all you see are Ponderosa Pine, Cedar, and perhaps another pine species or two.
Guess it depends on what part of a state or the city.

Driving from the west suburbs over to Portland, I see:

Douglas fir
Western redcedar
Western hemlock
Bigleaf maple
Pacific dogwood
Ash
Cascara
Vine maple
Indian plum
Ponderosa pine
Pacific madrone
Amalachier
Grand fir

Southern Oregon and the west side of the coast redwoods of northern CA have an even greater diversity of tree species in the mix.

Last drive down, I was noticing where the north coast redwoods overlapped sugar pine, madrone and incense cedar.

Haven't spent enough time is So-Cal to see what's in the hills down that way.
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Old 07-27-2010, 05:52 PM
 
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Georgia also has more acreage covered in forest and trees today than it did at the time of the Civil War 150 years ago ...
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Old 07-27-2010, 06:29 PM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,581,022 times
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Originally Posted by ATLnSAV View Post
Georgia also has more acreage covered in forest and trees today than it did at the time of the Civil War 150 years ago ...
If I remember correctly, unless I'm mistaken, the northern part of Georgia is less forested today, while the southern part is more forested than 150 years ago. Many of the original farms have been turned into tree farms for harvesting pine for pulp and building materials. It plays a big role in why southern Georgia has so many pines, more than would naturally occur.
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Old 07-27-2010, 07:46 PM
 
517 posts, read 1,156,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
The Southern Appalachians have more vegetative diversity than any other temperate location on the planet.

Here in the suburbs of Atlanta, you can drive down the road and see at least ten types of naturally occurring deciduous trees within many properties. Added to that, we have Lobolly pines as well. Out west, it's mostly only one or two varieties of trees. In the mountains of Southern California, all you see are Ponderosa Pine, Cedar, and perhaps another pine species or two.
Trust me there are more than one or two varieties of trees on the West Coast lol but hey even if there wasn't no one would care because the trees on the West Coast look like this...screw variety when you have trees like this

Uprooted Redwood in California

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Old 07-27-2010, 08:18 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,121,427 times
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Texas has more forest/semi-forest than what the old Hollywood western movies (actually filmed in Arizona and southern California) suggest it does. But then, it probably depends on just exactly what is the definition of forest land? East Texas, as Metro Matt said is, depending on direction of travel, either where the Southern pine forest begin or end.

But large parts of the rest of the state in the eastern half (not to be confused with East Texas) contains a lot of areas dominated by oaks...
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
1,780 posts, read 1,244,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
The Southern Appalachians have more vegetative diversity than any other temperate location on the planet.

Here in the suburbs of Atlanta, you can drive down the road and see at least ten types of naturally occurring deciduous trees within many properties. Added to that, we have Lobolly pines as well. Out west, it's mostly only one or two varieties of trees. In the mountains of Southern California, all you see are Ponderosa Pine, Cedar, and perhaps another pine species or two.
Oh yeah, because Pacific Redwood, Sitka Spruce, Coast Douglas Fir, Evergreen Hardwood Tanoak, Pacific Madrone, Big Leaf Maple, California Laurel, Red Alder, Bigcone Douglas Fir, Coulter Pine, California Walnut, Jeffrey Pine, Ponderosa Pine, White Fir, Lodgepole Pine, Red Fir, Sugar Pine, Incense Cedar, Great Basin Bristlecone Pine, Black Oak, Oregon White Oak, Canyon Live Oak, Oregon Ash, and Cottonwood amount to only on or two varieties. Please, do some research before you go making ridiculous claims. About half of these you will see in SoCal and about all of them you can see in NorCal.
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