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Old 07-27-2010, 09:59 PM
 
235 posts, read 253,216 times
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I've met westerners who say the feel CLAUSTROPHOBIC in the east because of the trees -- they like being able to see across a horizon for miles and miles. Thought that was strange. I LOVE the trees and feel naked and exposed in those neighborhoods out west. Anybody else feel that way?
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Old 07-27-2010, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
626 posts, read 1,026,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLnSAV View Post
I've met westerners who say the feel CLAUSTROPHOBIC in the east because of the trees -- they like being able to see across a horizon for miles and miles. Thought that was strange. I LOVE the trees and feel naked and exposed in those neighborhoods out west. Anybody else feel that way?
Yes i too enjoy lots and lots of trees and almost feel exposed without them. This is another reason i cant stand the newer cookie cutter subdivisions. All of the trees are basically wiped away in those type of neighborhoods and tiny little stick like "trees" are planted in their place.
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Old 07-27-2010, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
884 posts, read 1,524,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLnSAV View Post
I've met westerners who say the feel CLAUSTROPHOBIC in the east because of the trees -- they like being able to see across a horizon for miles and miles. Thought that was strange. I LOVE the trees and feel naked and exposed in those neighborhoods out west. Anybody else feel that way?
I feel like one of those Westerners a lot. However forested areas are really nice. I just like being able to see a horizon. The only thing I can't stand is extremely flat land where the horizon is half a mile in each direction. I need some "hillage" Trees are wonderful though. I live in a newer development in Colorado and I feel really exposed to the elements since all the trees are still so young and the only tall objects around are houses.
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Old 07-27-2010, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Rome, Georgia
2,706 posts, read 3,337,977 times
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Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
If I remember correctly, unless I'm mistaken, the northern part of Georgia is less forested today, while the southern part is more forested than 150 years ago. Many of the original farms have been turned into tree farms for harvesting pine for pulp and building materials. It plays a big role in why southern Georgia has so many pines, more than would naturally occur.
I don't know. North Georgia is pretty well forested. Much of it consists of the Chattahoochee National Forest. Now, if you include the clear cutting going on in Atlanta, then you may have a point.
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Old 07-27-2010, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Rome, Georgia
2,706 posts, read 3,337,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLnSAV View Post
I've met westerners who say the feel CLAUSTROPHOBIC in the east because of the trees -- they like being able to see across a horizon for miles and miles. Thought that was strange. I LOVE the trees and feel naked and exposed in those neighborhoods out west. Anybody else feel that way?
Absolutely.
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Old 07-28-2010, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Westminster/Huntington Beach, CA
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Sure, I can see how an easterner would think that is wierd that a westerner likes to see the horizon. But a westerner would find it wierd that an easterner likes thick forested areas around them. Where you grow up molds your geographical, climate, and cultural preferences.
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Old 07-28-2010, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
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I love living among a curtain of pine trees, but I also like to see the horizon every once in awhile. Texas is fortunate enough to have it all; forests, prairie, plains, hills, mountains, & dessert.
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Old 07-28-2010, 05:46 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,580,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsteelers247 View Post
Oh yeah, because Pacific Redwood, Sitka Spruce, Coast Douglas Fir, Evergreen Hardwood Tanoak, Pacific Madrone, Big Leaf Maple, California Laurel, Red Alder, Bigcone Douglas Fir, Coulter Pine, California Walnut, Jeffrey Pine, Ponderosa Pine, White Fir, Lodgepole Pine, Red Fir, Sugar Pine, Incense Cedar, Great Basin Bristlecone Pine, Black Oak, Oregon White Oak, Canyon Live Oak, Oregon Ash, and Cottonwood amount to only on or two varieties. Please, do some research before you go making ridiculous claims. About half of these you will see in SoCal and about all of them you can see in NorCal.
In the mountain forests of southern California, you don't see that many varieties of trees, on average. I'm not saying that a few trees of each type may not be located over a vast acreage, what I'm saying is that to the observer, all one sees, on average, is no more than four types of trees that are naturally growing. It is nothing like the Southern Appalachians, where from one location a person, up close, can spot perhaps a dozen or so naturally occurring types of trees.
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Old 07-28-2010, 05:50 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,580,618 times
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Originally Posted by Georgiafrog View Post
I don't know. North Georgia is pretty well forested. Much of it consists of the Chattahoochee National Forest. Now, if you include the clear cutting going on in Atlanta, then you may have a point.
Even today, northern Georgia is more forested that southern Georgia. My point was that southern Georgia has increased its forest percentage over the past one hundred fifty years, while northern Georgia has seen a decline, namely the result of urban and suburban development from Atlanta.

During the Civil War, northern generals commented on the vast wilderness of the northern part of Georgia.
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Old 07-28-2010, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Lower East Side, Milwaukee, WI
2,945 posts, read 4,150,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLnSAV View Post
I've met westerners who say the feel CLAUSTROPHOBIC in the east because of the trees -- they like being able to see across a horizon for miles and miles. Thought that was strange. I LOVE the trees and feel naked and exposed in those neighborhoods out west. Anybody else feel that way?
I totally agree. I much prefer neighborhoods with a dense canopy of mature trees to the wide open spaces of the West.
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