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Old 07-28-2010, 03:12 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,121,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toredyvik View Post
no, i know they aren't, but they experience more moderate weather, and I have heard of palm trees existing as far north as Vancouver on the west coast. I've wanted to hear if that's true. It's not the southern culture or latitude I care about, its the weather!
Well consider that some types of palm trees can exist in the New York area. Some of the most cold-hardy types can survive to temperatures around 0F to slightly lower depending it siting. That puts the hardiest ones growable to places as far inland and North as St. Louis and Cincinatti. I remember seeing long terms studies done on this with growing palm trees unprotected in Cincinatti.
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Old 07-28-2010, 03:45 PM
 
Location: where my heart is
5,642 posts, read 7,985,505 times
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I cannot picture palm trees covered in snow. Most of the NY Malls that plant palm trees in the summer take they away in the Falll. They don't quite "go" when all the other trees are turning gold, red, and orange.
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Old 07-28-2010, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,826,809 times
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Honestly, I do not think there is a northern southern city.

Miami does not count folks, it is more Latin American than even American in many ways culturally. It's topography and climate resembles more of the Bahamas than anything in the North.

There are times where I even leave Washington DC in the air, I may quite possibly be the only person who views it as neither northern nor southern. It is exactly what it is meant to be, and that is a neutral location and a district. It has more European characteristics than anything else (architecturally) and is far to cosmopolitan to be Southern or Northern.

Perhaps someone can make a case for Richmond, Virgina? I do not know enough about it.
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Old 07-28-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the universe
2,161 posts, read 3,994,055 times
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Your best bet is probably somewhere in South Florida. I would go with Virginia second.

Are in interested in the southwest?
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Old 07-28-2010, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Columbia Heights, D.C.
331 posts, read 784,212 times
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Geographically it would be D.C., Baltimore, and Wilmington...
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Old 07-28-2010, 08:36 PM
 
Location: The City
22,345 posts, read 32,221,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avtomat Kalashnikova View Post
Geographically it would be D.C., Baltimore, and Wilmington...

Wilmington always makes me chuckle - the would make the Philly MSA southern
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Old 07-28-2010, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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What about Tampa? It's not culturally Southern. Orlando is another similar city, but very touristy.
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Old 07-28-2010, 09:50 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,121,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TANaples View Post
I cannot picture palm trees covered in snow. Most of the NY Malls that plant palm trees in the summer take they away in the Falll. They don't quite "go" when all the other trees are turning gold, red, and orange.
I think that most of the ones used for decorations are not among the hardier types. Most of the hardier types are also smaller trees or shrubs. In terms of New York the hardiest could only survive in the NYC area and Long island.

Actually some types of palm trees were designed in nature to handle heavy snowfall, mainly types native to China.
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Old 07-28-2010, 10:51 PM
 
46 posts, read 138,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toredyvik View Post
no, i know they aren't, but they experience more moderate weather, and I have heard of palm trees existing as far north as Vancouver on the west coast. I've wanted to hear if that's true. It's not the southern culture or latitude I care about, its the weather!
Windmill Palms, Needle palms, Mediterranean fan palms, and Dwarf Palmetto can all be grown in colder climates. Cabbage Palms (Sabal palmetto) only really survives as far north as southeastern Virginia though.......
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Old 07-28-2010, 11:01 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,350,630 times
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Miami? San Diego?
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