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Old 07-28-2010, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Thornrose
892 posts, read 1,933,732 times
Reputation: 1289

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeaconJ View Post
True, most southern cities aren't warm year round...many non-southerners don't seem to understand this. Most areas of the South have 4 full seasons and get quite cold in winter. But actually several states have palm trees...the coastal areas of VA, NC, SC, and GA along with the coastal areas of AL, MS, LA, and TX. Palm trees are also found inland in NC, SC, and GA all the way up to the Piedmont.

And to the OP...Vancouver and San Francisco ARE NOT southern cities!
I live in VA and the only palm trees I have ever seen are the ones planted in VA Beach to make it appear more "beachy". I don't think they are natural. I have been along the OBX from Cape Lookout to Corolla and don't recall seeing any palm trees there either. I've been inland in NC too around Raleigh, Greensboro, and Charlotte and have never seen wild growing palm trees either. The only place I have ever seen inland palm trees are in central and southern Florida.

But to the OP's question, would New Orleans work? I doubt it has the transit, but it is a very old city and should have the density as a result. But it probably doesn't have the northern culture. I'd go with Miami. But overall, it's going to be hard to mimic the northeast in the deep south. The histories and climate are so different it just doesn't lend itself to it.
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Old 07-29-2010, 12:31 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,841,400 times
Reputation: 11141
Quote:
Originally Posted by toredyvik View Post
What city offers the following:

The accessibility, transit options, life, and density of a northern city

with the PALM TREES of the south? (year-round warmth, etc)

anything? I know some might say San Fransisco, but its not very warm there, am I correct? I hear its only 60 and foggy year-round.

I am also thinking of Vancouver, Canada. I hear they grow palms there, do they not? How warm is it in winter?

So, I'll let u guys run with ideas! I wish Chicago or Boston was where Miami sits.....maybe they can plop it OVER miami, giving us a kind of "Old NY"/"New NY" thing going on, like in Futurama haha

ok so any suggestions?
I'm sorry but do you really think that's what Northern culture is?
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Old 07-29-2010, 12:40 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,148,199 times
Reputation: 1407
Not trying to be a homer, but how was New Orleans left out so far. Seriously, it's as close as you're going to get.
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Old 07-29-2010, 07:25 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,121,370 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeopoldButtersStotch View Post
Windmill Palms, Needle palms, Mediterranean fan palms, and Dwarf Palmetto can all be grown in colder climates. Cabbage Palms (Sabal palmetto) only really survives as far north as southeastern Virginia though.......
That is a rather outdated map shown. Many places are about one climate zone higher due to the years that map included. The winters of the 1970's and early 1980's were more severe consistantly than any point in the last century which makes the data colder than the last 20 years and pre 1970's maps.

For example it shows that in St. Louis the average yearly mininum is around -10F. The problem is it that it rarely hits 0F anymore and last winter it hit -2F which is the lowest it has been in over a decade. The yearly minunum average in St. Louis now slightly above 0F and rising.
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Old 07-29-2010, 07:46 PM
 
Location: DC
529 posts, read 1,024,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I'm sorry but do you really think that's what Northern culture is?
yeah, the density, transit options, life of the northern cities contribute to their culture.
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Old 07-29-2010, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,977 posts, read 12,513,179 times
Reputation: 8742
Quote:
Originally Posted by toredyvik View Post
no, i know they aren't, but they experience more moderate weather, and I have heard of palm trees existing as far north as Vancouver on the west coast. I've wanted to hear if that's true. It's not the southern culture or latitude I care about, its the weather!

I was surprised when moving to Portland and seeing Palm Trees. I have also seen them in the Seattle area and Vancouver. They have been planted of course and there are very few of them. You will definitely not see streets lined with them. Mainly people have planted them in their yards.

It looks nice to see them but truthfully it seems strange and out of place, to see Palm Trees surrounded by the dense fir tree forests that make up the PNW.
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Old 07-29-2010, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,724,774 times
Reputation: 7282
Quote:
Originally Posted by toredyvik View Post
What city offers the following:

The accessibility, transit options, life, and density of a northern city

with the PALM TREES of the south? (year-round warmth, etc)

anything? I know some might say San Fransisco, but its not very warm there, am I correct? I hear its only 60 and foggy year-round.

I am also thinking of Vancouver, Canada. I hear they grow palms there, do they not? How warm is it in winter?

So, I'll let u guys run with ideas! I wish Chicago or Boston was where Miami sits.....maybe they can plop it OVER miami, giving us a kind of "Old NY"/"New NY" thing going on, like in Futurama haha

ok so any suggestions?
Parts of Texas look and feel like the Midwest.
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Old 07-30-2010, 01:34 PM
 
56,823 posts, read 81,169,050 times
Reputation: 12565
Maybe the Tidewater area of VA, Myrtle Beach SC, Charleston SC, Savannah GA....?
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Old 07-31-2010, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Seattle
28 posts, read 64,745 times
Reputation: 13
I would say Atlanta, It has mild winters and might have palm trees but only grown in houses and not in public. It is growing rapidly and getting more modernized than any other southern city.
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Old 07-31-2010, 06:48 PM
 
8,287 posts, read 11,851,469 times
Reputation: 4948
I would say Miami as well since it was developed by Henry Flagler who was one of the founders of Standard Oil and was from Hyde Park, New York. The cultural influences from New York City since Miami's founding can't be denied and even the New York Times labeled Miami & it's metro the "sixth borough".
New Yorkers were here from Miami's founding when it was being pedaled as a resort city in the NYC metro area and northern cities. The city has had a sizable Jewish population dating back from the early 1920s as well as a heavy Caribbean influence. The first person to sign the city of Miami's charter was a black man named Silius Austin from the Bahamas who worked for Flagler's Florida East Coast railroad.
Even Miami's street grid system is similar to Manhattan's. It wasn't until after WW2 when Southerners started moving to the Miami area in record numbers since so many of them were in the military & training in Miami Beach and decided to settle here after the War.
Go to a Dolphins game and half the crowd roots for the NY Jets or a baseball game and the Yankees are loved here!
As we say in Miami we are not a "southern city", never was and never will be!
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