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View Poll Results: Do people in northern virginia have an southern accent?
Yes of course every place has it's own accents 31 56.36%
kind of 8 14.55%
No they sound like any other northerner 16 29.09%
Voters: 55. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-03-2010, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Columbia Heights, D.C.
331 posts, read 782,870 times
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Born and raised in D.C. here.
If I pronounce the word Maryland as "Murrlyn or Murrland" is that southern?
or If I pronounce Maryland as "Mar-ryl-land" is that more northern?

Anyways regardless, every time I go down south people always ask me if I'm from somewhere up north. I'll admit there is some drawl in my voice, but I say "water" and "coffee" just like a New Yorker would.
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Old 09-03-2010, 08:52 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,728 posts, read 6,134,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avtomat Kalashnikova View Post
Born and raised in D.C. here.
If I pronounce the word Maryland as "Murrlyn or Murrland" is that southern?
or If I pronounce Maryland as "Mar-ryl-land" is that more northern?

Anyways regardless, every time I go down south people always ask me if I'm from somewhere up north. I'll admit there is some drawl in my voice, but I say "water" and "coffee" just like a New Yorker would.
Ive People from philly say "murrland" too.
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Old 09-03-2010, 08:57 PM
 
1,766 posts, read 2,782,723 times
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I've always found the whole VA accent debates to be rather interesting.

Virginians sound Southern with a bit of a twist to me. I definitely hear hints of northest twang in there. Sort of a blend of both- leaning South just a bit in most cases, but practically identical to a native of "deeper" South regions in other cases.

I find it to be a pleasing accent at any rate. I really wish I had an opportunity to see more of VA besides Arlington and Richmond.

It seems like a nice place to live.

Last edited by NorthDeKalb; 09-03-2010 at 09:10 PM..
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Old 09-03-2010, 09:10 PM
 
Location: 5 years in Southern Maryland, USA
791 posts, read 2,459,044 times
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Speaking just about White people, many very elderly ones born and raised in Wash. D.C. itself, southern MD, and the NoVA suburbs often have southern Tidewater-type accents (non-rhotic meaning the "R" is often not pronounced). I have a friend who is 82 and born and raised in Prince Geo. County MD and he talks like a Mississipian. But this is not true of baby-boomers and younger generations.

People from Baltimore and Maryland in general, including both sides of Chesapeake Bay, pronounce vowels with the front of their mouth. The long "O" sound is always nasalized more like "EW" or AOO". "Wikipedia" goes into this in much more detail than I can explain here. But I have even heard this nasality sometimes in people from throughout PA as well as NoVA too.

In southern states east of the Blue Ridge, I've noticed that the traditional (non-rhotic) Tidewater accent is being abandoned by the younger generations, who now adopt more of an Appalachian (rhotic) twangy accent - possibly because they hear it constantly from country music recording artists.

Last edited by slowlane; 09-03-2010 at 09:20 PM..
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Old 09-04-2010, 06:37 AM
 
11,874 posts, read 32,904,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THePlaza View Post
<H1 class=subject> <H1 class=subject>

Since Virginia is southern I'm assuming even the northern side has an accent even if not thick as the southern part I was wondering because in some movies and shows the setting will be northern virginia and there just sound normal like any other northerner
</H1></H1>
Excuse me? A "normal" accent is a northern accent? First of all, that is an outrageously absurd statement for a variety of reasons. Secondly, there's no such thing as a northern accent; someone from Maine doesn't have the same accent as someone from Brooklyn, for example.
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Old 09-04-2010, 07:08 AM
 
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Northern Virginia is neutral......definitely a planet away from us down here in Southwest VA.


this is my favorite southern accent
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Old 09-04-2010, 07:57 AM
 
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From my travels, most of the DC area of northern Virginia does not sound very southern. Even Fredericksburg doesn't sound very southern. However, south of Fredericksburg, it does begin to sound mostly southern. The Richmond area, for example, is as southern as what you find in North Carolina. The southern half of Virginia sounds very southern with the exception of the Norfolk/Va. Beach area, which is a mix, with the southern natives sounding southern and the transplants not sounding very southern. The people of the cities of Danville, Martinsville, Roanoke, Lynchburg, and Bristol all sound southern. Charlottesville has a lot of non-southern sounding people, probably because it's home to the university of Virginia and there are a lot of transplants in that town.

Yet, as far as northern Virginia goes, I'd say that the DC area is as follows:

Arlington-not very southern (maybe 10%)
Alexandria-not very southern (maybe 10%)
Fairfax County-not very southern (maybe 25% of the population)
Prince William County Manassas) (maybe 40% of the population have at least some mild southern speech)
Loudon County (Leesburg) (maybe 50% have some form of southern speech).

Outside DC area:

Fauquier County (Warrenton) (maybe 60% southern sounding)
Culpeper County (Culpeper) (about 75-80% southern)

Most rural counties in northern Virginia have a majority of residents who sound southern, or who at least display some of the traits of southern speech.
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Old 09-04-2010, 01:21 PM
 
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I can instantly tell if someone is from DC/Baltimore based on their accent. Sometimes its pretty indistinguishable and neutral.. depends on the person.
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Old 09-04-2010, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Thornrose
892 posts, read 1,928,869 times
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From this statement, it's obvious you have never been here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwriter View Post
Neutral accent? No, it doesn't. I can PLAINLY hear the Southern drawl in the area. NoVa is a SOUTHERN area with a lot of Northern transplants, just like Charlotte, Atlanta, Northern Kentucky, etc. It's still the South.
People may think Richmond is vastly more southern because of the various civil war monuments and convince themselves that they hear it at every place they go. But Richmond has also had many people move in from NY and other places, not as much as NoVa, but still a very sizeable number. A co worker of my step dads who works in Richmond who is from NY originally claimed that he was shocked by the amount of ex NYers he had run into, and that Richmond was nothing like he expected. Again because of preconceived notions. I go there often and don't notice accents, unless it's an older person.

This from someone born and raised in VA who had a friend from NJ and when I'd go with him to NJ on trips and his friends would meet me they exclaimed, "But you don't have an accent!" And another fellow who I met through a social occasion who is originally from NY or NJ thought I was from up north too. My guitar teacher who was from VT thought I was from up north as well as my boss who is from MD. So when I say I have no discernable accent as I did in my previous post, I mean it. And I'm not the only one here that doesn't have one. There are many that do however, but they are generally older or are in agricultural type employment. This is a big state with 7 million + residents. To think that every single person has an accent is absurd on so many levels. It'd be like me assuming that every person in MN talked like they did in the movie Fargo.
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Old 09-04-2010, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
5,990 posts, read 11,563,690 times
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I'm sorry.
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