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Old 06-25-2007, 08:51 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,816 posts, read 12,321,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremeyk482 View Post
I actually happen to love the Northeast (and by Northeast, I mean NY, NJ, PA, CT, RI, MA, NH, VT, ME; anything south of NJ and PA we consider the south).

The people here are not rude, nor elitist. IMO, they are frank. They tell you what they feel. Don't you think that's better than people in the south and midwest, where faults are sugarcoated and greeted with smiles? Or how people out west are obsessed with money and material items (particularly LA). The suburbs of CT and Westchester NY are filled with very, very modest people. People here have a great deal of money, yes, but you'll see them pulling out of their driveway in a 1992 Volvo, or you'll pass a home in an upscale neighborhood and see a Camry or Accord in the driveway. People here would rather put money into the public school system than buy an Escalade, two boats and a Beamer for Sunday drives.

If you think people who are honest and frank are elitist, then maybe you should live up here for a year or two to see what it's all about. I hear many people refer to CT as a very snobby state. But since when was minding your own business an attribute of being snobby? It's called being reserved.
This really goes counter to everything's I've experienced and people I've met. In college I did have friends from NJ and Long Island and they said they wanted to leave for a place that was "less snobby" and more laid-back. Its a sentiment in Maryland as well as further south in NC and FL about how the pace of life used be nice and people were friendlier and more polite back in the day before we had so many transplants. I lived in New Orleans until I was 7. Down there, people didin't cut you off on the highway, if you waved people WILL be you pass, strangers would talk on the street and people would get up for old ladies on the bus. I get the feelign that a lot of people from the Northeast, particularly NYC and Boston, look down on people from small towns and especially from the South and the Midwest. So many people in my high school referred to people in more rural sections of my school district as hicks, hillbillies, trailer trash or rednecks. I'm Asian American and this kind of elitism turns me off.

People think I'm unsophisticated and shallow because I listen to country music and I'm not pretentious. I know a lot of people will disagree with me on this, but the Northeast seems very conformist and materialistic. During my travels through the South and the inland west (Nevada, Utah, Idaho) you could see a lot of indepedent family-owned businesses and quirky little stores and diners in small towns and all thats threatened by chain restaurants and big box stores. A lot of my friends and relatives blame this kind of conformity as a Northeastern thing, since people move in and all they want is a giant supermarket that puts the general store, the drugstore and the bakery out of business. In North Carolian I had the best iced tea in my life....from a little stand run by two 6-year old sisters in front of their house's white picket fence..but up here people would rather buy the Minute Maid version from vending machine. We've always felt the friendliness in the South was genuine and that is stems from religious values (most of the really nice people from up north I know are either born again Christians or Jewish.)

This is the first time I've heard that Westchester is not snobby Practically everyone I've ever met has mentioned Westchester and Long Island (plus Greenwhich CT and the Upper West Side) as the epitomes of materialism and arrogance.
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Old 06-25-2007, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
570 posts, read 1,910,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terrapin2212 View Post
This really goes counter to everything's I've experienced and people I've met. In college I did have friends from NJ and Long Island and they said they wanted to leave for a place that was "less snobby" and more laid-back. Its a sentiment in Maryland as well as further south in NC and FL about how the pace of life used be nice and people were friendlier and more polite back in the day before we had so many transplants. I lived in New Orleans until I was 7. Down there, people didin't cut you off on the highway, if you waved people WILL be you pass, strangers would talk on the street and people would get up for old ladies on the bus. I get the feelign that a lot of people from the Northeast, particularly NYC and Boston, look down on people from small towns and especially from the South and the Midwest. So many people in my high school referred to people in more rural sections of my school district as hicks, hillbillies, trailer trash or rednecks. I'm Asian American and this kind of elitism turns me off.

People think I'm unsophisticated and shallow because I listen to country music and I'm not pretentious. I know a lot of people will disagree with me on this, but the Northeast seems very conformist and materialistic. During my travels through the South and the inland west (Nevada, Utah, Idaho) you could see a lot of indepedent family-owned businesses and quirky little stores and diners in small towns and all thats threatened by chain restaurants and big box stores. A lot of my friends and relatives blame this kind of conformity as a Northeastern thing, since people move in and all they want is a giant supermarket that puts the general store, the drugstore and the bakery out of business. In North Carolian I had the best iced tea in my life....from a little stand run by two 6-year old sisters in front of their house's white picket fence..but up here people would rather buy the Minute Maid version from vending machine. We've always felt the friendliness in the South was genuine and that is stems from religious values (most of the really nice people from up north I know are either born again Christians or Jewish.)

This is the first time I've heard that Westchester is not snobby Practically everyone I've ever met has mentioned Westchester and Long Island (plus Greenwhich CT and the Upper West Side) as the epitomes of materialism and arrogance.
In my post I specifically focused on CT and Westchester. I didn't get into details regarding people from NJ and LI and I can agree that folks in those areas are known to be rather rude and standoffish.

When you mention Greenwich, CT, you're talking about a community unlike any other in the world. Here, people live on sprawling estates, have trust funds worth millions and an average home price that would make most rich American's squeal. But even this town is known for being very fiscally conservative.

The Connecticut I'm talking about is the upper-middle class suburbs (which house probably 90% of the state). Towns like Avon, Oxford, Southbury, Ridgefield, Guilford, etc. The majority of people here are hard working, determined and absolutely not snobby. Again, it's reserved. People mind their own business. Why is that so bad?

You're right, it's a bit different in Westchester County NY, next to Connecticut. I wouldn't call the people here snobby either, however. They're largely Italian, outspoken and blunt. That's not elitist.

I disagree when you say the Northerners are attempting to spread 'big-box' stores across the nation. It's actually funny you say that, because anywhere I go in the South, I can't find a family owned deli, a real diner, a real pizza place, fresh seafood or a place such as my communities 'country store' where friendly neighbors stroll by and catch up. In the South, all I see are Walmarts, Targets, Winn-Dixies, Shoneys, Cracker-Barrel and the like. Charlotte has nothing but chains. Same goes for most parts of FL and GA.

Most suburban towns in CT and Westchester have strict zoning laws that prohibit big boxers from coming in. Actually just a few months ago, Walmart wanted to build in a suburban town in CT, and the town held a referendum to decide what to do. It was opposed by a landslide, 18,349-325.

Bottom line is that you are sorely mistaking if you think Northerners are snobby people who only eat at chain restaurants and shop at malls. Have you been to Connecticut? Have you been to Westchester? If you have, take a second trip and stay for longer. Try to open your mind to the culture and mindset of people here. If you've never been, don't stereotype!!!!!!
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