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Old 07-31-2010, 11:07 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,131,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATL_Aficionado View Post
Yes, unless they removed it this morning lol.
Well then it's moss. It's just not common around here unless it's in a cypress swamp. It doesn't usually just hang off trees like in Georgia or somewhere.

You uploaded that yourself?
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Old 07-31-2010, 11:09 AM
 
1,766 posts, read 2,782,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Well then it's moss. It's just not common around here unless it's in a cypress swamp. It doesn't usually just hang off trees like in Georgia or somewhere.

You uploaded that yourself?
You're right, I never really see any of that in the New Orleans area but I do see a whole lot outside Kenner going toward Baton Rouge on the left. Lots of it, now that's a real swamp.
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Old 07-31-2010, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,131,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ATL_Aficionado View Post
You're right, I never really see any of that in the New Orleans area but I do see a whole lot outside Kenner going toward Baton Rouge on the left. Lots of it, now that's a real swamp.
Hmm, I've never seen it over there. :shrug:
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Old 07-31-2010, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,506 posts, read 7,310,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago'sFinest View Post
In Chicago we have "sides", and my cultural boundary is the Southside. The Southside feels like a mini city because of how big it is. It's bigger than most cities, population about like 1,233,612 which is the size of Dallas. There are alot of people from the hood in the Southside who live and do everything here without venturing to other sides of town often. Alot of people here are told not to go to the Westside. And some people are so Southside orientated that they dont feel comfortable elsewhere in town. The other sides feel different when you go to them because of their vibe and style.
Where did you find the exact population of the southside? And is that the number for everyone south of Madison St.?
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Old 07-31-2010, 01:59 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
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To me, the difference between Nashville and Memphis is Nashville has far fewer black people, and it's not in the Deep South like Memphis. Nashville feels very different to me. Call me crazy, but it almost feels like Ohio. It just lacks the Deep South, soulful feel that you find in Memphis.
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Old 07-31-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
7,909 posts, read 12,163,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grapico View Post
Regarding that aren't Birmingham and Atlanta more of the same culture, more so than Jackson and Birmingham? After all they used to be part of Georgia.

File:United States 1789-08-1790.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Your proof for that point is using a map of the States and Territories from 1790? That was 210 years ago. No place in the United States is even close to having the same culture it had back then, most especially the areas now known as Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi. Back in the 18th century all three were dominated by Native American (mostly Cherokee and Creek) culture. It wasn't until the early mid-19th century that white settlers and slaves came in significant numbers...after the Federal government depopulated the region of it's Native inhabitants. Read up on the Trail of Tears if you weren't aware of this.

Birmingham and Atlanta used to be a lot more similar 60 years ago, but they diverged quite dramatically starting in the 70s. Atlanta became a big international city with a diverse population, Birmingham stalled out and remained a medium sized city with pretty much the same demographics. Though some similarities remain, they do not remotely have the same culture and spending 2 minutes in either city that would be come dramatically clear to anyone.
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Old 07-31-2010, 06:12 PM
 
1,250 posts, read 2,116,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
To me, the difference between Nashville and Memphis is Nashville has far fewer black people, and it's not in the Deep South like Memphis. Nashville feels very different to me. Call me crazy, but it almost feels like Ohio. It just lacks the Deep South, soulful feel that you find in Memphis.
It is largely due to the terrain differences. Memphis is in the Mississippi Delta region which has a much higher black population (especially comparing rural areas) than the Nashville area. This is related to where a plantation culture could of developed and the number of slaves in an area.

I noticed another cultural boundary near St. Louis. In the outlying areas going away from the city there is one culture that hugs the Missouri River up to Jefferson City and down the Mississippi to Cape Girardeau, and another one more than 5-10 miles away from the rivers. From what I can tell it is due to the differences in ancestry and religion since near the rivers is predominantly German and Catholic while away from the rivers it is largely English/American ancestry and Evangelical Protestant.
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Old 07-31-2010, 06:23 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, United States
4,230 posts, read 9,131,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Birmingham and Atlanta used to be a lot more similar 60 years ago, but they diverged quite dramatically starting in the 70s. Atlanta became a big international city with a diverse population, Birmingham stalled out and remained a medium sized city with pretty much the same demographics. Though some similarities remain, they do not remotely have the same culture and spending 2 minutes in either city that would be come dramatically clear to anyone.
Statistically, Birmingham and Jackson are close. In feel and appearance, and even a little culturally it feels a lot more like Atlanta. If you instantly took someone from a random part of Birmingham to a random part of Atlanta (with the exception of certain neighborhoods and the freeway of either), they'd probably never know they were in a different city or state.
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Old 07-31-2010, 06:51 PM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Statistically, Birmingham and Jackson are close. In feel and appearance, and even a little culturally it feels a lot more like Atlanta. If you instantly took someone from a random part of Birmingham to a random part of Atlanta (with the exception of certain neighborhoods and the freeway of either), they'd probably never know they were in a different city or state.
I was speaking culturally/vibe/citylife. In that regard there is zero similarity.

But to your point, there are some superficial similarities. Both cities were booming in the first half of the 20th century. Chances are a lot of the same construction companies were used for houses, building, and such. However, Birmingham came to a near dead stop growth wise, Atlanta kept on going. Then there is the fact Birmingham is considerably hillier than Atlanta, built on a street grid, was a steel town, more blue collar. Add it all up and there as different as can be, but not completely without similarities. Get what I'm saying?
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Old 07-31-2010, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Funky Town, Texas
4,135 posts, read 7,188,135 times
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Dallas, Memphis, Little Rock, Shreveport, and Monroe all share similar cultures. There isn't much difference culture wise between Dallas and Memphis.
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