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Old 08-01-2010, 08:04 AM
 
57 posts, read 129,091 times
Reputation: 26

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Let me clarify what I mean when I say this. I've been reading a lot on here about the cities that people were surprised they loved and the cities people were surprised they hated, which granted were people mostly on vacation and not looking to move to an area.

But I'm wondering, say you have a bunch of money and could live anywhere, how much does it really matter where you live? I mean I'm sure whether you live in a big city, suburb or rural area would make a difference and I guess things like weather and if you're near a beach if you like that would make a difference too, but how much of a difference would there be between dozens of metropolitan areas that might meet your criteria.

I guess I'm basically wondering if there's a magic place for everyone or if nothing will ever be this perfect place that a lot of people envision.
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Old 08-01-2010, 02:10 PM
 
Location: McKeesport
4,542 posts, read 7,443,723 times
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Everyone has their own preferences and that is why city vs. city arguments are so futile. Some people like cold weather, some people like hot weather. Some people like historic cities, some people like modern cities. Some people like rich cities and seem people like affordable cities. Some people think the rust belt is dead, and others see it as a new frontier.

Does it matter what city you live in? If money were no object, no. If you had enough money to choose a neighborhood that suited your tastes, a person could make out well in most American cities. For example, if a person loved historic brownstones and Victorians, but had to live in San Francisco, it would help if he had a few million in the bank. Whereas if he lived in Pittsburgh, he wouldn't need very much money at all.

This is why it is very important to consider the cost of living as well as how your taste fits your budget in the city you choose. Choose a city that fits your budget, and has the things you desire.
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Old 08-01-2010, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN (North Minneapolis area)
2,032 posts, read 4,319,096 times
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Its all subjective
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Old 08-01-2010, 04:45 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,796,552 times
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If you have a bunch of money, most likely, it is due to a business or investment opportunity that you made. If you invested in a business and it took off, more likely than not, you now live near the first store or HQ of your chain, or corporation.

And if you have a bunch of money, you have a "getaway" mansion where you can get away from it all and enjoy a more serene area, or at least, a "different" area.

So, that's why you have rich people everywhere, it really doesn't matter what area is "best" for you, it's where you have your business. Inherited money is a totally different thing, though.
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Old 08-01-2010, 05:46 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,573,808 times
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Eh, I think they are different personally... There are only a few cities in the U.S. that I am "satisfied" with. The rest are fine and are doing their own things well but just not for me.
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Old 08-01-2010, 06:36 PM
 
12,300 posts, read 15,202,635 times
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There are tons of differences between cities. Of course, climate is first and foremost. Many of the large cities are on the water, but some are totally landlocked with no navigable waterways. Some are more dense than others. Some have great mass transit systems, some have decent ones and some expect you to drive everywhere.
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Old 08-01-2010, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
492 posts, read 863,015 times
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To me, there isnt much of a difference between cities in the U.S. when you categorize them by size (population). All large cities are just about the same, as is all medium sized cities are the same, and most small cities. Each city at a certain size level will offer just about the same amenities as another city its size. (ex.- transportation options, job opportunities)

There are things that can make a city unique such as its history, location, climate/weather, accents, etc. but for the most part... same ish, different toilet.

Look at rural areas also. Life in a rural area of NY and PA will probably be very similar to one in NC and GA or wherever.
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Old 08-01-2010, 08:11 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 24,573,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VA7cities View Post
Look at rural areas also. Life in a rural area of NY and PA will probably be very similar to one in NC and GA or wherever.
Don't think so, rural areas differ highly as well.. rural NorCal is extremely different than rural GA.
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Old 08-01-2010, 10:03 PM
 
Location: california
255 posts, read 739,124 times
Reputation: 230
I think there seems to be this utopian dream that everyone has..everyone thinks there is this magical city that we are all destined to find...but some others don't care, or are just used to where they live and afraid of change.
I love travel and to explore new worlds.
Every city is unique because just like people, cities have general personalities, physical makeup, appearance and ambiance...and we are all unique so not every city clicks with every person.
But there are pros and cons to every location.
Much of the time it depends on your attitude, experiences, and friendships/family..that determine if we like aplace or not. Someone who enjoys skiing, snow, hiking and nature may enjoy colorado more than someone who likes sunsets, beaches, hot weather, and wearing bikinis most of the year...that's an LA or miami person..yet maybe they visit miami and dislike it..or LA is too smoggy..I have been reading here almost every day for months, and there's a general theme: a person is always looking for that perfect glove fit of a place.
I love it when they ask "where should I move?"
Leaving it up to complete strangers to decide their life changing decision, but it shows how desperate many of us feel to have that connection with a place. (Myself included)
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