U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-14-2010, 12:25 PM
 
Location: SENIOR MEMBER
655 posts, read 2,047,304 times
Reputation: 910

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by choosing78 View Post
You challenge me to find a house in Denver area. Okay, I did. I bought a 3/2 with a garage in Broomfield 15-20 minutes outside of Denver 15-20 minutes from Boulder. It is not brand new but close.
I guess that's a good find on your part. All I know is that whenever I see a TV Real Estate program showing people looking at homes to buy in the METRO Denver, Seattle, & Portland areas, the more affordable ones $300,000 + plus were built in the 1940's and are smallish bungalows on small lots. Remember, I'm talking about AT THE METRO AREA not 40-50 miles outside. I & a friend watching the TV shows could not believe how bad for the price, those homes appeared. We said that we would never consider buying those homes under any circumstances at those prices. I thought that the potential home buyers of those homes would be insulted and ask the realtor if they were crazy for showing them such properties. Here in Syracuse the same type smallish bungalow would probably sell for about $85,000 to $89,000 at the most.

I remember one man who lived in San Diego and because of home prices in SD decided to try to find a lower price home in/move to Denver. I could not believe what the real estate agent was showing this man in the $150,000 to $200,000 price range. I would call those properties dump bungalows/shacks=sorry, that's what they were! Actually two of those houses were empty/abandoned and repossessed by the unfortunate banks that had a financial interest in them. The houses were in BAD condition inside and outside. The land those houses were on was all overgrown with tall weeds & grass. Next door to one of those houses was a property that was heavily overgrown with tall weeds & grass with trash & junk laying around. (That house was the house that this man ended up buying.) That house gave me the "chills" just to see it, let alone think about buying it. I wouldn't have even gotten out of the car to look at it. Looked like a place that would be infested with rodents & more! I figure that real estate TV programs would NOT film/show those kind of homes unless those homes are the norm in those metro city areas. Does Denver, Seattle, Portland have some sort of prohibition against suburban development? That's the only reason I could think of as to why that style/old aged/condition homes would be priced so OUTRAGEOUSLY HIGH!

I'm glad that I live in a metro area that is rated among the 10 lowest home prices metro areas of the whole country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-14-2010, 02:13 PM
 
726 posts, read 1,871,547 times
Reputation: 413
I love that someone posts based on something they saw on tv. Every city in the US has areas that people consider "desirable" but to an outsider they look rundown. My guess is if you saw that on tv it is likely he was buying in an "up and coming" fringe neighborhood. No my house wasn't the exception and it's not 40-50 miles outside of Denver. It's approximately 18 miles from city center. It takes 20 min avg to get downtown. My city is also 15 min from Boulder, Colorado and most recently voted one of the top places to live in the US by Money Magazine. You're glad you live in a place where house values are low and taxes are high? To answer the other poster, Syracuse is one of the snowiest areas in WNY/Central NY. Most years it is the snowiest. NY weather is depressing. Too much cloudiness, rain, humidity, ice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2010, 02:19 PM
 
Location: SENIOR MEMBER
655 posts, read 2,047,304 times
Reputation: 910
Default Clarify for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Peterson View Post
filler
In response to your paragraph by paragraph comments on one of my previous posts==

Of course population density matters! Your don't understand that?? That FACT must be taught in basic economics; don't you think so? Are you going to try to tell/convince ALL OF US that the cost of the same exact house is not going to be different between New York City-Weeki Wachee-Miami-Romulus NY-Los Angeles-Bradford PA-etc.?? You must know better than that!

You say you're confused about some of the prices that I mentioned in my post. Let me explain as simply as I can for you to understand. There are many new home builders in metro Syracuse - all home builders have various styles/costs of property & its development/use different building materials/have different final home prices - a builder can build less expensively in some metro locations than in more expensive towns, plus other varying factors. So, a hypothetical exact same home/property might be able to be built for $140,000 in Baldwinsville & Brewerton - built for $150,000 in Minoa - built for $165,000 in Cicero & Clay - built for $185,000 in Manlius - built for $195,000 in Skaneatles. Location plus costs involved determine final home price. Understand? I don't have an economics book to recommend to you but there must be one published that could explain this all to you in greater detail than what I've explained. You might find such a book at Barnes & Noble Book Store or Borders Book Store.

You are correct. Florida home foreclosure rates/statistics ARE higher than here in New York. The metro Syracuse area and greater several counties area of Central New York State are FAR LOWER than what Florida has experienced. That's not to say that we have zero foreclosures; our area/region for the most part did not finance homes for people who could not afford them and we did not over build/speculative build homes for which there were no buyers like was done in Florida. I've seen the high-rise/other condo buildings and the new single family home developments in Florida on national television broadcasts where there are no buyers and EMPTY UNITS/HOMES - EMPTY BUILDING LOTS. National television broadcasts are such a great place to stay informed when a person watches the videos and interviews regarding the TRUE situations across the country.

Yeah! The snow, snowfall, blizzards, ice storms (rare), & rain haven't demolished my home yet and I hope that your HURRICANES & TORNADOES do not demolish your home as other people in Florida have experienced.

You are fortunate that you haven't experienced a tornado where you live. When I lived in the metro Orlando area there were occasional tornadoes nearby that destroyed homes. It's fortunate that you don't live closer to the areas where tornadoes have gone through the Tampa Bay area which have been reported on TV news broadcasts in past years. One year I remember FOUR separate damaging tornadoes each occurred a week or two apart across mid-Florida; those people just couldn't catch a break from the effects/storms/damage/destruction. You were lucky that your property did not experience those damaging tornadoes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2010, 03:51 PM
 
Location: SENIOR MEMBER
655 posts, read 2,047,304 times
Reputation: 910
Default ? Typical Homes / Prices ? ? Lack of Snowfall there ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by choosing78 View Post
I love that someone posts based on something they saw on tv. Every city in the US has areas that people consider "desirable" but to an outsider they look rundown. My guess is if you saw that on tv it is likely he was buying in an "up and coming" fringe neighborhood. No my house wasn't the exception and it's not 40-50 miles outside of Denver. It's approximately 18 miles from city center. It takes 20 min avg to get downtown. My city is also 15 min from Boulder, Colorado and most recently voted one of the top places to live in the US by Money Magazine. You're glad you live in a place where house values are low and taxes are high? To answer the other poster, Syracuse is one of the snowiest areas in WNY/Central NY. Most years it is the snowiest. NY weather is depressing. Too much cloudiness, rain, humidity, ice.
Why would a Denver Real Estate TV program want to even bother showing such run-down homes at such outrageous high prices? That wouldn't attract people anywhere to want to buy such a undesirable property unless that's what you get for the money in Denver. In bad condition and over priced? Doesn't make sense to me/doesn't encourage me to buy such a house. Would you buy such a house? Seems like money down the drain to me. A house in such run-down condition should almost be "given" away in the hopes/understanding that the new owner WOULD DEFINITELY make considerable/thorough renovations/improvements. If better/nicer homes were available at similar prices, why wouldn't the Real Estate TV programs show those instead, and why wouldn't the potential buyers buy a nicer home at the same money if they were available rather than take the run-down property? The man from San Diego was not looking to buy in an "up-and-coming" fringe neighborhood. He clearly was NOT satisfied/happy with the home that he bought but he said that's all he could afford in Denver and he could never hope to buy anything in San Diego. My choice would have been to go to a different city or to a different part of the country were I could buy a better home for the same money.

Money Magazine chose Boulder as one of the top places to live; that's great, be proud. I've heard on TV programs that Fort Collins, CO. & Austin, TX are always high on most lists too; that's great also. I hope those TV reports are accurate; some people say you can't believe what you hear on TV reports. Forbes Magazine chose Syracuse as the second (2nd) best metro area in the U.S. to live; all factors considered. Rochester and Buffalo followed close behind the Syracuse rating; all near the top of the list. We have several smaller cities in New York State that rate very high in the smaller city category as best places to live also; Ithaca and Saratoga Springs among others.

Also, ? you have no snow ? in Colorado & Denver nowdays? I hope the National TV Weather programs were not lying to us when they reported wintertime closings of your Denver airport and late-season snowfall (much later than here in Upstate New York) at Denver & northward & southward! Do you think that the global warming effect is lessening your snowfall? Growing palm trees may not be far behind.

You mentioned Syracuse rain & cloudiness = Seattle holds the title for both. Syracuse can't beat them. You mentioned humidity = that title must be somewhere in the Gulf of Mexico states; I can't find that trophy here!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2010, 05:53 PM
 
726 posts, read 1,871,547 times
Reputation: 413
Believe it or not some cities are not concerned with "recruiting" more citizens. Take a look at the Denver/Colorado forums you'll see the multitudes that want to live here. No one needs to try and convince anyone it's great here. Why in the world are you arguing with me I live here I know what houses sell for. Yes there are tons of expensive houses but there are tons of houses under 200k too. As far as weather goes please spare me. Yes Denver gets a lot of snow, we also get a lot of sunshine (about double the number of days your area). We regularly get warm sunny days in the upper 50's in January. Last Thanksgiving it was 70. What we don't get are ice storms, rain and clouds that last for days, and sweltering humidity. To base your whole argument on one episode of some show you saw on tv is ludicrous. I've lived in both areas of the country so I can comment on both. You watched an episode of a cable show.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2010, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,955,281 times
Reputation: 5397
Quote:
Originally Posted by grdnrman View Post
In response to your paragraph by paragraph comments on one of my previous posts==

Of course population density matters! Your don't understand that?? That FACT must be taught in basic economics; don't you think so? Are you going to try to tell/convince ALL OF US that the cost of the same exact house is not going to be different between New York City-Weeki Wachee-Miami-Romulus NY-Los Angeles-Bradford PA-etc.?? You must know better than that!

You say you're confused about some of the prices that I mentioned in my post. Let me explain as simply as I can for you to understand. There are many new home builders in metro Syracuse - all home builders have various styles/costs of property & its development/use different building materials/have different final home prices - a builder can build less expensively in some metro locations than in more expensive towns, plus other varying factors. So, a hypothetical exact same home/property might be able to be built for $140,000 in Baldwinsville & Brewerton - built for $150,000 in Minoa - built for $165,000 in Cicero & Clay - built for $185,000 in Manlius - built for $195,000 in Skaneatles. Location plus costs involved determine final home price. Understand? I don't have an economics book to recommend to you but there must be one published that could explain this all to you in greater detail than what I've explained. You might find such a book at Barnes & Noble Book Store or Borders Book Store.


You are correct. Florida home foreclosure rates/statistics ARE higher than here in New York. The metro Syracuse area and greater several counties area of Central New York State are FAR LOWER than what Florida has experienced. That's not to say that we have zero foreclosures; our area/region for the most part did not finance homes for people who could not afford them and we did not over build/speculative build homes for which there were no buyers like was done in Florida. I've seen the high-rise/other condo buildings and the new single family home developments in Florida on national television broadcasts where there are no buyers and EMPTY UNITS/HOMES - EMPTY BUILDING LOTS. National television broadcasts are such a great place to stay informed when a person watches the videos and interviews regarding the TRUE situations across the country.

Yeah! The snow, snowfall, blizzards, ice storms (rare), & rain haven't demolished my home yet and I hope that your HURRICANES & TORNADOES do not demolish your home as other people in Florida have experienced.

You are fortunate that you haven't experienced a tornado where you live. When I lived in the metro Orlando area there were occasional tornadoes nearby that destroyed homes. It's fortunate that you don't live closer to the areas where tornadoes have gone through the Tampa Bay area which have been reported on TV news broadcasts in past years. One year I remember FOUR separate damaging tornadoes each occurred a week or two apart across mid-Florida; those people just couldn't catch a break from the effects/storms/damage/destruction. You were lucky that your property did not experience those damaging tornadoes.
What i said was that population density does not always correspond to higher prices. If you can prove that it does I will concede but you can't and that is a fact.

Nice try at being condescending but I said I was confused because you mentioned in one post what you could get for $X amount and when I brought up what you could get elsewhere for the same amount then all of a sudden that same home you were speaking of sprouted a pool. It's called sarcasm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2010, 08:23 PM
 
Location: SENIOR MEMBER
655 posts, read 2,047,304 times
Reputation: 910
Default Puzzling situation

Quote:
Originally Posted by choosing78 View Post
Believe it or not some cities are not concerned with "recruiting" more citizens. Take a look at the Denver/Colorado forums you'll see the multitudes that want to live here. No one needs to try and convince anyone it's great here. Why in the world are you arguing with me I live here I know what houses sell for. Yes there are tons of expensive houses but there are tons of houses under 200k too. As far as weather goes please spare me. Yes Denver gets a lot of snow, we also get a lot of sunshine (about double the number of days your area). We regularly get warm sunny days in the upper 50's in January. Last Thanksgiving it was 70. What we don't get are ice storms, rain and clouds that last for days, and sweltering humidity. To base your whole argument on one episode of some show you saw on tv is ludicrous. I've lived in both areas of the country so I can comment on both. You watched an episode of a cable show.
Here in Syracuse & Suburbs we are always happy to see new families and singles move to our area; new residents are welcome.

Our weather & tempertures. Yeah. We sometimes experience 50's in January; we call it a "January thaw". We've had exceptionally nice days during Novembers. This past winter, in April, we had several days in the 70's and it even reached 80; believe it or not. I only had to remove snow from my driveway 3 to 5 times this past winter. If the driveway only has one inch or so of snow, I don't bother removing it. Remember, I don't live up north in the worse "snow belt" or on Tug Hill Plateau where they could receive 3 or 4 feet of snow in a really bad storm. Yup! The winds blowing south-southeastward off Lake Ontario can give us an extra amount of snow; maybe like what happens in your area when it has been reported that your airport had to be closed or your area gets one of those unexpected snow storms that temporary closes some of your Denver area highways. Can't fight unpredictable nature.

Regarding the San Diego man who was looking for a Denver home. Do you think that when the Denver Real Estate agents told that San Diego man that the run-down homes were the only homes in the $150,000 - $200,000 that they had available to show him in that price range, they were just trying to unload undesirable/over priced properties on unsuspecting out of state prospects? The house that the San Diego man bought would be a tear-down house in my area. I don't believe building codes here would ever deem that house habitable. No one would be allowed to move into that house in the condition it was in. Certainly no mortgage finance company here would approve a mortgage on that house. Here, the mortgage companies require that homes be in excellent condition; no bad roof, no inadequate electric wiring & circuit breaker boxes, no outdated plumbing system, etc. etc.; everything must pass all building codes. Mortgage companies here want to be sure the money they loan out is on a solid, codes approved property. Maybe the San Diego man had cash to pay for the house; I don't know. That way he might not run into problems unless a building codes inspector happened to visit the property later on.

Every time I see Real Estate TV programs (there have been several) from those three cities, Denver - Seattle - Portland, so many of the homes they show are from the 1940's or a few years older or a few newer and their price range starts at a low of $300,000 and UP ^^! That's why I wondered if those cities have some sort of prohibition against suburban home development=That could account for the artifically high prices for decades-old homes. There's nothing wrong with buying well kept older homes. That price older home simply would not sell for those high prices in my area. Wow, I just thought of the upscale kind of new built home anyone could buy for $300,000 here in most of my area Suburbs. I can only think of 3 suburbs here where home prices would tend to be more expensive.

Well, I guess I won't be able to determine the reason for the big disparity between home prices in Syracuse and Denver (and Seattle & Portland) on this City-Data site; was just curious for a good reason for it. If those cities don't have suburban development sufficient enough to meet potential demand, that can be part of the reason I guess. Got to sign off for today.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2010, 09:10 PM
 
Location: SENIOR MEMBER
655 posts, read 2,047,304 times
Reputation: 910
Default Like a Top

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Peterson View Post
What i said was that population density does not always correspond to higher prices. If you can prove that it does I will concede but you can't and that is a fact.

Nice try at being condescending but I said I was confused because you mentioned in one post what you could get for $X amount and when I brought up what you could get elsewhere for the same amount then all of a sudden that same home you were speaking of sprouted a pool. It's called sarcasm.
I believe I already did prove that population density DOES correspond to higher home prices. The same exact home in New York City vs. the same exact home in Bradford PA.

I added money to the home price when I included a pool. Ignore that if you care to. You are attempting to "spin" your comments. Your "spinning" will not change what I explained to you previously. I stand with the previous explanations I gave you regarding home prices. Try to "spin" and "confuse" and "double talk" and "provoke" all you want; I won't play your silly game.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2010, 10:25 PM
 
726 posts, read 1,871,547 times
Reputation: 413
I'm not sure what part it is you're not getting. Google real estate listings. You are either a local realtor (hence the salesman like approach in your initial post) or are just really argumentative. Have you ever lived in my area? enough said. Like I said before I have lived in your area and I know what your posting is false. Whatever though I will not argue with you anymore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2010, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 17,955,281 times
Reputation: 5397
Quote:
Originally Posted by grdnrman View Post
The section of Upstate New York where you can buy new construction single detached homes for $160,000 is ... These homes may have smaller square footage living space but usually have 3 or 2 bedrooms, 1-1/2 to 2 bathrooms, livingroom, an eat-in kitchen, garage, and full or partial basement area; this complete home built on a 1/5th to 1/3rd acre single home property=you are not sharing one piece of land with any other home/family.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Peterson View Post
You can get a brand new home with an in-ground pool on a 1/2 acre for $160,000 where I am.
There are 3 bedroom, 2 bath homes with attached 2 car garages with about 1800-2000 sq ft living area.

I am sure the same is true in many other states and areas.
Quote:
Originally Posted by grdnrman View Post
All the new homes here, that I will be talking about are single/detached homes=NOT multiple units nor several attached units. You mentioned a new home in your area with an in-ground pool on a half acre for $160,000; I assume that a garage is included in that price? You can buy a 3 bdrm, eat-in kitchen, livingroom, 1-1/2 to 2 bathroom, w/garage, with basement and add an in-ground pool on 1/4 acre in one of our westside suburbs for a total price of $150,000 to $160,000=quite a reasonable price for a new home in a suburb near a city the size of Syracuse.
Quote:
Originally Posted by grdnrman View Post
I believe I already did prove that population density DOES correspond to higher home prices. The same exact home in New York City vs. the same exact home in Bradford PA.

I added money to the home price when I included a pool. Ignore that if you care to. You are attempting to "spin" your comments. Your "spinning" will not change what I explained to you previously. I stand with the previous explanations I gave you regarding home prices. Try to "spin" and "confuse" and "double talk" and "provoke" all you want; I won't play your silly game.
I hope I wouldn't have to show you that what I said , "High population density does not always equal higher prices", is true. All I would have to do is use something like Detroit and Phoenix as examples. Detroit has about twice the population density of Phoenix and we all know where Detroit's home prices are. We can go back and forth with examples all day but the difference is that you seem to think it is an absolute and I just say it does not always correspond.

Nope, I am not spinning. Please look at your posts above and explain how I am spinning. It looks like you added a pool and took $10,000 off the price.
Who is spinning?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top