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Old 08-04-2010, 03:25 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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Cities tend to disproportionately attract young unmarried people looking for work as well other people leaving "their roots." (Immigrants, married people striking out on their own as well, etc) Those groups tend to be more liberal or become more liberal. If they fail at finding their dream they may want assistance and they might want a more socially liberal atmosphere because they're trying to figure themselves out so may want more options or just adventure.

I think it's also easier to disconnect from a tradition when you're in a city. You can "disappear into the crowd" so to speak whereas in the country or some suburbs a greater degree of connection and conformity might be plausible.

Granted this is mostly speaking in terms of conservative versus progressive (social) rather than Right versus Left. (economic) I think the economic aspect could be, in the US, because cities are more likely to have non-white poor people and single women.
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Old 08-04-2010, 04:07 PM
 
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I am thinking it has to do with population density of an area in terms of individualism vs. communitarianism. Depending on how many people are near you or how interconnected you are with others does tend to slant you towards one end or the other.
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Old 08-04-2010, 04:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imperialmog View Post
I am thinking it has to do with population density of an area in terms of individualism vs. communitarianism. Depending on how many people are near you or how interconnected you are with others does tend to slant you towards one end or the other.
Not sure how density factors in, but I believe you are spot on re: individualism vs. communitarianism.
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Old 08-04-2010, 06:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Not sure how density factors in, but I believe you are spot on re: individualism vs. communitarianism.
I am thinking density would factor in since it would require going more towards one way or the other. This might be why in election periods the swing voters are most often in suburban areas.
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Old 08-04-2010, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
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I think liberalism in cities may stem from many laws being passed that would not be passed in rural areas. With people living so close or on top of each other, cities may have felt that they had no choice but to pass laws regulating all types of behavior. In rural areas, most of these types of laws are unnecessary. I usually equate liberalism with lots of laws regulating people and conservatism with a minimal amount of laws regulating people.

Of course, there are times when some form of regulation is necessary.
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Old 08-04-2010, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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it seems like the liberal/conservative thing in America is mostly race-related, so i would basically think that has to do with it.
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Old 08-04-2010, 10:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlainsDrifter73 View Post
I think liberalism in cities may stem from many laws being passed that would not be passed in rural areas. With people living so close or on top of each other, cities may have felt that they had no choice but to pass laws regulating all types of behavior. In rural areas, most of these types of laws are unnecessary. I usually equate liberalism with lots of laws regulating people and conservatism with a minimal amount of laws regulating people.

Of course, there are times when some form of regulation is necessary.
I agree with this, for the most part. A major city without regulation/governance would be bedlam.
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Old 08-04-2010, 11:26 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MimzyMusic View Post
it seems like the liberal/conservative thing in America is mostly race-related, so i would basically think that has to do with it.
I think that one study of conservative/liberal cities implied that, but I think that's a bit inaccurate as they were only looking to party. Blacks are the most consistently Democratic voting group in the nation, but that's likely due to a mix of solidarity and economics. On issues that don't concern poverty or crime-sentencing there's a fair variety of views among black Americans.

Even on partisan voting when you take out Blacks, White Evangelicals, and White Mormons I think much of the racial thing is greatly reduced in significance. GovPro lists Garden Grove, California as one of America's most conservative suburbs and it's around 22% Vietnamese. Other towns in their "Most conservative" list that have, according to their stats, noticeably higher than average Asian populations are

Plano, Texas
Orange, California
Corona, California
Anchorage, Alaska
Huntington Beach, California


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The Cubans, Hmong, Vietnamese, and a few other groups that fled Communism tend to lean Right. Latino Protestants also tend to be mixed or slightly Right-leaning. For whatever reason GovPro decided to ignore this, possibly because to really get into it would complicate the point they were trying to make and maybe confuse people. See Gallup indicates Asians are about the most liberal group in America. This is likely because several Asian groups are quite liberal. Chinese-Americans tend to vote fairly Democratic and are liberal on social issues. Most non-Christian Asians tend to come out liberal/Left. So to really "get into it" you would need to treat Asians and Hispanics as not being races, which they aren't races, but as various ethnic groups. That would make things more involved than they maybe wanted.

Among whites those who are lapsed Catholics or not Christian at all tend to lean Left. Marriage is also a factor. White married Christians, of any denomination, are in many ways the "core" of the Republican Party and conservative movement. Unmarried non-Christians, regardless of race, will tend to be Liberal/Left/Democratic. They deal with the marriage issue, but otherwise dealing with this would mean treating whites as something other than just a race-blob and that's something they're maybe hesitant to do.

Last edited by Thomas R.; 08-04-2010 at 11:43 PM..
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Old 08-05-2010, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TruthBeautyGoodness View Post
I'm not interested in talking about politics, or about the pros/cons of "liberalism," but I am interested in knowing why urban areas seem to be more liberal and rural areas tend to be more conservative.


What's your take? Thanks!
All of this below is just a big guess and I'll just slice into one liberal demographic for a response:

I think it's about money and those who get something for nothing tend to congregate where those free services are offered hence most live in major cities. That is, they are not liberals who are hung up on liberal ideology but take on the liberal tag because they vote for the people who will give those free things to them. I doubt if the people in the projects, for example, are big proponents of recycling, higher income taxes, a path to citizenship for illegals, and gay marriage. They would be for big government, though, because government takes care of them (wefare, food stamps). You call them liberals because that's how they vote but that isn't necessarily who they are. They are voting for the people who give them stuff and they live in places where they have access to many free services.

It is my observation rural people are steeped in traditions and history. It's a big part of their lives. That's why they are conservative.
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Old 08-05-2010, 06:00 AM
 
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The city doesn't breed liberalism. The city tends to have a greater population of non-whites, who tend to be less "conservative", in terms of the party they support. It doesn't mean that they're liberal.

On a small scale, you will see your more liberal groups in central cities, but the suburbs, part of the built-up area, are generally more conservative. Why? A lot of it has to do with schools. Most of your central city schools are deplorable, so they choose not to live there. It's also cheaper in the suburbs, and it has all the ammenities associated with family life. People who aren't attracted to schools, such as singles, and those who are more interested in historic homes and museums, are going to be more drawn to cities. The latter group, for some reason or another, tends to be somewhat more liberal.

That said, the biggest reason that most cities appear more liberal is due to the support for the Democrat Party, which in general is most supported by the large numbers of "minorities" living in the city. If it weren't for these groups, these cities would be more or less "moderate" places, as there are still a fair number of white conservatives living in central cities.
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