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Old 08-05-2010, 06:18 AM
 
7,281 posts, read 13,520,136 times
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It isn't just a racial issue. Having lived in several major US cities, and having lived in several rural areas, I can say that people certainly were, on balance, more "liberal" in every sense of the word in the cities.

Fiscally, they paid higher taxes and were more okay with doing so because they saw their money at work every day in the form of public services, transit, etc. Then again, they were generally accustomed to higher cost-of-living... and generally higher salaries/wages... than you might find in more rural areas, on balance.

Socially, tolerance is a necessity in a big city. If only for the sake of your sanity. If you went around railing against every lifestyle you disagreed with, you'd never get anything done. Basic civic engagement, exposure to art and culture... these things are considered "liberal" by some and are more prevalent in big cities, even if they aren't universal. As far as the art and culture part, artists and musicians and writers and actors tend to live in cities (so there's a bit of a feedback loop here), so there are simply more opportunities to get exposed to this stuff if you live in a city.
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Old 08-05-2010, 08:01 AM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
The city doesn't breed liberalism. The city tends to have a greater population of non-whites, who tend to be less "conservative", in terms of the party they support. It doesn't mean that they're liberal.

On a small scale, you will see your more liberal groups in central cities, but the suburbs, part of the built-up area, are generally more conservative. Why? A lot of it has to do with schools. Most of your central city schools are deplorable, so they choose not to live there. It's also cheaper in the suburbs, and it has all the ammenities associated with family life. People who aren't attracted to schools, such as singles, and those who are more interested in historic homes and museums, are going to be more drawn to cities. The latter group, for some reason or another, tends to be somewhat more liberal.

That said, the biggest reason that most cities appear more liberal is due to the support for the Democrat Party, which in general is most supported by the large numbers of "minorities" living in the city. If it weren't for these groups, these cities would be more or less "moderate" places, as there are still a fair number of white conservatives living in central cities.
Then how do you explain traditionally Blue states like MA, RI, CT, MN? While they do have have many minorities living in their cities, they are lily-white overall.
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Old 08-05-2010, 08:04 AM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaBredChicagoan View Post
It isn't just a racial issue. Having lived in several major US cities, and having lived in several rural areas, I can say that people certainly were, on balance, more "liberal" in every sense of the word in the cities.

Fiscally, they paid higher taxes and were more okay with doing so because they saw their money at work every day in the form of public services, transit, etc. Then again, they were generally accustomed to higher cost-of-living... and generally higher salaries/wages... than you might find in more rural areas, on balance.

Socially, tolerance is a necessity in a big city. If only for the sake of your sanity. If you went around railing against every lifestyle you disagreed with, you'd never get anything done. Basic civic engagement, exposure to art and culture... these things are considered "liberal" by some and are more prevalent in big cities, even if they aren't universal. As far as the art and culture part, artists and musicians and writers and actors tend to live in cities (so there's a bit of a feedback loop here), so there are simply more opportunities to get exposed to this stuff if you live in a city.
This is true. Cities like Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis, St Paul and Boston are predominately white and decidedly liberal.

I think a lot of posters got their broad brushes out on this thread!
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Old 08-05-2010, 08:11 AM
 
2,402 posts, read 3,577,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Then how do you explain traditionally Blue states like MA, RI, CT, MN? While they do have have many minorities living in their cities, they are lily-white overall.
New England and the upper midwest vote as they do, for two reasons:

1) With New England, the Kennedy legacy and its assocation with the Democrat Party.

2) Both are relatively white and homogeneous, and thus there is less interaction. With lack of interaction the views on other races void is filled with the pc, nonsensical trash coming out of mainstream, Hollywood popular channels.

Of course, this is all general. There are other variables that can be discussed, but the above has a lot to do with it.
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Old 08-05-2010, 09:30 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,320,926 times
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Not only do diversity tolerance play a part, but commerce as well. Cities sprung up as centers of commerce, so one is more or less inclined to be tolerant of the different views of those with whom they do business. It's a bit hard to have a good business relationship with someone while demonizing their culture, religion, etc.
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Old 08-05-2010, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 14,306,789 times
Reputation: 6904
How ya gonna keep 'em down on the farm after they've seen Paris?
Cities offer more opportunities and attract a variety of people. Most higher educational institutions are in cities. In these institutions people can learn about other cultures. Educated people are usually more liberal.
In a city of a variety of people there is a greater exchange of ideas, the inhabitants can encounter other cultures, thereby breaking down stereotypes.
City media is usually different and often provides a window to the world for those who are interested. This interest provokes many to travel. In cities you'll find more who have traveled for personal interest, not because the military send them there.
Rural people maybe only value practical knowledge, such as trades and agriculture, without much enthusiasm for law, philosophy, history, geography, etc. Also, maybe less ambitions; Get a high school diploma, learn a trade, get a job, get married, raise kids, work until retirement, and die with the belief that heaven awaits.
Cities offer more cultural activities; concerts, film, museums, exhibits, literature, etc. Attending is not required, people go because of interest. Rural people probably have little interest in such culture.
Curious city people are liberal. People who view life as a learning experience are usually more liberal. Cities innovate, changes occur constantly.
Cities have more non-conformists, rural areas have more conformists.
Rural life hasn't changed much in decades. The conservatives resist changes and may even feel threatened by changes.
Someone mentioned that people move to cities because so many free services are available. Don't kid yourself. Cities are more expensive than rural areas. To maintain a decent standard of living in the city requires an education, there's plenty of competition. Maybe some believe that cities provide free services only to discover the harsh reality of sleeping in subway entrances and surviving on charity organizations.
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Old 08-05-2010, 05:25 PM
 
Location: 30-40N 90-100W
13,856 posts, read 22,953,196 times
Reputation: 6679
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaBredChicagoan View Post
Socially, tolerance is a necessity in a big city. If only for the sake of your sanity. If you went around railing against every lifestyle you disagreed with, you'd never get anything done. Basic civic engagement, exposure to art and culture... these things are considered "liberal" by some and are more prevalent in big cities, even if they aren't universal. As far as the art and culture part, artists and musicians and writers and actors tend to live in cities (so there's a bit of a feedback loop here), so there are simply more opportunities to get exposed to this stuff if you live in a city.
I don't think conservatives are necessarily intolerant. Tolerance can simply mean "I don't like what you're doing, but I will tolerate it." A tolerant person could support Lawrence v Texas (ending anti-sodomy laws) but oppose same-sex marriage because they see that as validating rather than just tolerating. Or tolerate Islam, but dislike any public acknowledgment of Islam or mosques being in their neighborhood.

Also an intolerant person can keep things to themselves or learn to put other things first. My Dad is very homophobic and fairly anti-Islam. He was like that as a young man in Kansas City too. Interestingly it was in a smaller town where he first had to work with a gay guy, in fairness KC in the Kennedy era gay guys he saw were going to places clandestinely, and although he "tolerated" the gay guy he worked with he still tended to say that all gay men should be placed in mental institutions. Which is maybe a bit of a change, initially he said executed, but not exactly acceptance.

Also considering race-riots that have occurred in cities I'm not sure it's entirely fair that cities are all homes of tolerant and open-minded people.
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Old 08-05-2010, 06:38 PM
 
1,729 posts, read 3,990,024 times
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Every major Liberal town in America has at least one large college in the city. And almost all of them are built in and around water.
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Old 08-05-2010, 07:47 PM
 
5,857 posts, read 14,041,383 times
Reputation: 3482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
How ya gonna keep 'em down on the farm after they've seen Paris?
Cities offer more opportunities and attract a variety of people. Most higher educational institutions are in cities. In these institutions people can learn about other cultures. Educated people are usually more liberal.
In a city of a variety of people there is a greater exchange of ideas, the inhabitants can encounter other cultures, thereby breaking down stereotypes.
City media is usually different and often provides a window to the world for those who are interested. This interest provokes many to travel. In cities you'll find more who have traveled for personal interest, not because the military send them there.
Rural people maybe only value practical knowledge, such as trades and agriculture, without much enthusiasm for law, philosophy, history, geography, etc. Also, maybe less ambitions; Get a high school diploma, learn a trade, get a job, get married, raise kids, work until retirement, and die with the belief that heaven awaits.
Cities offer more cultural activities; concerts, film, museums, exhibits, literature, etc. Attending is not required, people go because of interest. Rural people probably have little interest in such culture.
Curious city people are liberal. People who view life as a learning experience are usually more liberal. Cities innovate, changes occur constantly.
Cities have more non-conformists, rural areas have more conformists.
Rural life hasn't changed much in decades. The conservatives resist changes and may even feel threatened by changes.
Someone mentioned that people move to cities because so many free services are available. Don't kid yourself. Cities are more expensive than rural areas. To maintain a decent standard of living in the city requires an education, there's plenty of competition. Maybe some believe that cities provide free services only to discover the harsh reality of sleeping in subway entrances and surviving on charity organizations.
I agree with much of this. Americans tend to "vote with their feet" and select the places that fit their values and desired lifestyle. I believe that many conservative suburbanites are reluctant "city" dwellers who would be more comfortable in a rural area, but they cannot support their desired level of income in rural areas due to lack of economic opportunities.
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Old 08-05-2010, 07:53 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
2,257 posts, read 6,968,192 times
Reputation: 4061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stars&StripesForever View Post
New England and the upper midwest vote as they do, for two reasons:

1) With New England, the Kennedy legacy and its assocation with the Democrat Party.

2) Both are relatively white and homogeneous, and thus there is less interaction. With lack of interaction the views on other races void is filled with the pc, nonsensical trash coming out of mainstream, Hollywood popular channels.
What the...?
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