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Old 08-16-2010, 04:02 PM
 
Location: New Hampshire
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Hm, I guess I didn't really consider San Benito Mountain to be in the Bay Area. But I was talking more about prominence than elevation above sea level. San Benito has a prominence of 3,481 ft. compared to Mt. Washington, NH's prominence of 6,148 ft.

Not to diminish the majesty of the coastal ranges, though - they're beautiful, especially in the springtime.
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Old 08-16-2010, 04:17 PM
rah
 
Location: Oakland
3,315 posts, read 8,119,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
Hm, I guess I didn't really consider San Benito Mountain to be in the Bay Area. But I was talking more about prominence than elevation above sea level. San Benito has a prominence of 3,481 ft. compared to Mt. Washington, NH's prominence of 6,148 ft.

Not to diminish the majesty of the coastal ranges, though - they're beautiful, especially in the springtime.
Yeah, i edited on a little about prominences at the end of my post. I forgot about prominences, and some of the mountains of the Appalachians definitely have the Bay Area beat there, there's no doubt. As far as San Benito mountain, i'm defining the Bay Area as it's more recently been defined in the Census, so San Benito and Santa Cruz Counties are definitely a part of it.
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Old 08-16-2010, 04:25 PM
 
8,335 posts, read 9,794,366 times
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Here you go:
SummitPost - Ultra-prominence Peaks of the 48 States -- Climbing, Hiking & Mountaineering

Great site btw (one of my favorites on the entire net). This specific one is on prominence of peaks in the lower 48, including how it is defined. There is a list of the peaks also.
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Old 08-16-2010, 04:34 PM
 
619 posts, read 1,507,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thHour View Post
Here you go:
SummitPost - Ultra-prominence Peaks of the 48 States -- Climbing, Hiking & Mountaineering

Great site btw (one of my favorites on the entire net). This specific one is on prominence of peaks in the lower 48, including how it is defined. There is a list of the peaks also.
That is a great site. And if anyone noticed Arizona had 5 peaks in it.
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Old 08-16-2010, 04:49 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,610,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verseau View Post
Hm, I guess I didn't really consider San Benito Mountain to be in the Bay Area. But I was talking more about prominence than elevation above sea level. San Benito has a prominence of 3,481 ft. compared to Mt. Washington, NH's prominence of 6,148 ft.

Not to diminish the majesty of the coastal ranges, though - they're beautiful, especially in the springtime.
The mountains in the central coast ranges of California or around the Bay Area can't compare to the size or prominence of Mt. Washington and the Presidential Range--which are some of the only mountains with a real alpine feel east of the Rockies---or the highest points in the Southern Blue Ridge. But the highest peaks around the California Coast are comparable in both size and prominence to anything in the Appalachians between the Blue Ridge north of Virginia and south of Northern New England. Most of the coastal mountains are rising from bases close to sea level as well.
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Old 08-16-2010, 04:52 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,610,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thHour View Post
Here you go:
SummitPost - Ultra-prominence Peaks of the 48 States -- Climbing, Hiking & Mountaineering

Great site btw (one of my favorites on the entire net). This specific one is on prominence of peaks in the lower 48, including how it is defined. There is a list of the peaks also.

Cool list...I knew a lot of the Cascades would be on there, but I was surprised by the number of Arizona peaks on there too. There's a lot of peaks on the list that I've climbed or hiked around, but there's a lot of more obscure mountains as well. Just more peaks to bag...
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Old 08-16-2010, 07:33 PM
 
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That ultra prominence is interesting for the western Mtns but doesn't work in the east. Mount Mitchell's "saddle" is in Illinois for crying out loud! Mt Leconte, Clingman's dome, Thunderhead, etc. look equally prominent when viewed from the valley. Maybe more so as the valleys in TN are lower than the valleys in NC.
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:25 PM
 
1,152 posts, read 2,613,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thHour View Post
Here you go:
SummitPost - Ultra-prominence Peaks of the 48 States -- Climbing, Hiking & Mountaineering

Great site btw (one of my favorites on the entire net). This specific one is on prominence of peaks in the lower 48, including how it is defined. There is a list of the peaks also.
I have this website bookmarked, it is awesome. Here is another link to that site of some mountain peaks in Idaho, a state with some of the most amazing and hidden peaks anywhere in the western USA. A lot of Idaho's tall mountains peaks are so remote they don't have names and supposedly Idaho is the most mountainess state in the lower 48, the state has the largest roadless wilderness areas left outside of Alaska. There are craggy peaks all over this state, it's a mountain lovers paradise. These links are for some mountain ranges in the Eastern/Central area of the state.


SummitPost - Idaho Eleveners Images - Hiking & Climbing


http://c0278592.cdn.cloudfiles.racks...nal/262340.JPG



SummitPost - Idaho Eleveners -- Climbing, Hiking & Mountaineering




http://www.summitpost.org/image/2636...-bedstead.html




http://www.summitpost.org/image/3047...39/spires.html




SummitPost - White Clouds Images - Hiking & Climbing







http://www.summitpost.org/image/5557...ahsimeroi.html

Last edited by TohobitPeak; 08-16-2010 at 08:36 PM..
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Old 08-16-2010, 08:46 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,610,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
That ultra prominence is interesting for the western Mtns but doesn't work in the east. Mount Mitchell's "saddle" is in Illinois for crying out loud! Mt Leconte, Clingman's dome, Thunderhead, etc. look equally prominent when viewed from the valley. Maybe more so as the valleys in TN are lower than the valleys in NC.
Yeah, I was confused by that as well--at first I thought it was an error until I did some more research.

Here's a good explanation I found of how the saddle is determined for prominence.

Orometry: Every Summit has a Saddle

Basically the saddle is the lowest point on what is considered the ridge connecting the peak to a higher peak(parent peak) which is closest in distance. So for example Mt. Williamson, the 2nd highest peak in the Sierras only has a prominence of 1,677 feet since that is the elevation difference to the saddle which is the lowest spot in the 6 mile distance between its summit and that of Mt. Whitney. For San Jacinto Peak in Southern California the saddle is considered Beaumont at San Gorgonio Pass as it's the lowest spot until you hit Mt. San Gorgonio giving it a prominence of over 8,000 feet.

However if you take Mt. Whitney---the highest peak in the lower 48, the next closest peak on with a higher elevation that could be connected via a ridge is actually the Pico De Orizaba volcano in Mexico--so the saddle is considered to be a low point of the contour surrounding Whitney somewhere in New Mexico. For Mt. Rainier the saddle is a point in British Columbia on the way to Denali. For Denali the saddle is somewhere in Nicaragua.

So for Mt. Mitchell, the saddle is considered to be a low point somewhere in Illinois on supposed ridge connecting it with the next highest peak.(Burney Peak in South Dakota maybe?) So it doesn't matter if there are peaks slightly lower in the vicinity of the summit, the saddle and prominence is determined based on the closest summit with a higher elevation. Which is why the saddle for say, Clingmen's Dome, would probably be somewhere around Asheville, since the next highest peak is Mt. Mitchell.

Basically it seems like prominence is more useful if you aren't looking at the highest peak in the range and its not hundreds or even thousands of miles away from a higher peak.
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Old 08-16-2010, 11:11 PM
 
619 posts, read 1,507,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Cool list...I knew a lot of the Cascades would be on there, but I was surprised by the number of Arizona peaks on there too. There's a lot of peaks on the list that I've climbed or hiked around, but there's a lot of more obscure mountains as well. Just more peaks to bag...
Im not surprised by the peaks of Arizona. A lot of them are called "Sky Islands" and rise up out of the lower desert areas and prairies. The only one that isn't was Humphreys Peak which is in Northern Arizona. Arizona does have tons of tall mountain ranges and peaks but since people always shun away Arizona thinking its desert they miss out on the fact that we have tons of high points.
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